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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello fellow wee-Stromers, i'll be picking up my very own next week. Won it on ebay all of 3 hours ago. Heres the link, you think it was a good deal?...

Suzuki : DL650 | eBay


So, about me. I'm 27 years old, second bike, first in 3 years. Had a Ninja 250 that I logged a whole 600 miles on back then and got most of the fundamentals down at that time. Had a little mishap on a 30mph panic stop that scared me off and I sold it. I was also younger and stupider and wasn't wearing a helmet, jacket or pants at the time. My biggest concern going to this bike is the obvious increase in size and weight, as well as ride height, as i've yet to sit on one (i'm 5'9 with a 30" inseam). I really wanted a more touring oriented bike this time around and this seems like a great compromise and a gateway to a bigger Honda ST down the road someday. Anyway, is there anything I should be aware of off the bat with this bike? This one has no stand like my Ninja did, is that something I should pick up? Also, a little off topic, but whats the best place to pick up gear (online)? Thanks in advance, can't wait to get my bike!

Mike
 

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Congratulations on the new bike. Looks like you got a good deal. I am a tightass and buy my gear at motorcyclecloseouts.com. Everything you should know about the bike can be found on stromtrooper.com. Just spend some time and look at the sticky threads. When you say "is there anything I should be aware of" do you mean problems? If so, not really any problems except for the buffeting issue that can be fixed by the madstad. Other than than that, it is an extremely well made bike. Ride a bit, buy some stuff to make it better and be careful. It is top heavy for someone who is new to a bigger bike.
 

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Looks like you may need a new side stand...that one looks like an odd angle in the photo. Best of luck in your enjoyment of the bike.
 

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You definitely need a new sidestand! Use the search function at the top of the page and change the gas frequently until you figure our what YOU need to make it work for you and the type of riding you do.
 

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How does the sidestand get bent down that far up?
I've never seen this before, at least not on a bike that was "never crashed or laid down".
Maybe the sidestand got broken (somehow) and they put on a stand from a different bike...
In any case, congrats on the new bike.
 

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I've been riding Ninja 250s for a while. I had two of them and just sold one and bought a V-strom. It's a great bike and I still ride my remaining Ninja.

The v-strom is a whole different bike. It's much taller and much heavier. There are things you can do on a stationary Ninja 250 that will leave a V-strom lying on it's side. It's much more difficult to "duck walk" around and much more top heavy. I have a 33" inseam and I'm glad I do! If you lose your footing when you stop it's much more difficult to keep upright. If you don't have crash bars on your V-strom, get some. You'll also miss the center stand, so get one of those too.

It's really just a matter of adapting to the taller and heavier bike. I'm getting more used to it, but it's still not easy when the bike isn't moving. Once it's moving there are no problems. It handles really well and all the weight and size issues go away once it's in motion. Just be very careful when you start to ride it, especially if you come to a stop on uneven ground or a slippery surface (gravel, sand, oil etc). It will be significantly more of a handful than the Ninja 250 was, especially since you're probably slightly too short to flatfoot it.

Oh, and don't even think about riding it without a helmet, jacket, boots, pants and gloves. Maybe once you get used to it you could go to lighter gear if that's your inclination (it's not mine), but starting out I'd fully armor up if I were you. You were lucky with your Ninja 250 incident. Don't push your luck on the V-strom!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the input! Are center stands/kickstand installations pretty DIY friendly? Ive seen plenty of them for sale online so I may just order one now. Also, we're planning on loading the bike into a Van to bring back. I've done it once, but with a much lighter bike. I'll have a helper of course. Any one have experience in doing this?
 

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Crashbar installation (Givi) was simple. Centerstand (SW Motech) was slightly more work, the only real issue there is stretching the spring but even that wasn't too bad with the aid of a couple of screwdrivers. Maybe an hour to install both from opening the boxes to ready to ride.
 

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Congrats on your new horse.

Looks like a good deal -- now you can spend some on making it 'yours' -- but only once you decide you're going to keep it.

Stating the obvious, it's got a much greater displacement that your previous bike, so "Easy does it," and I'd second the call for wearing appropriate protective gear.

It may be a bit easier to learn with a fuel tank that's LESS than half full, for a great deal of the topside weight is in the tank, when full. Practice braking. A lot. You may wish to practice the training maneuvers you learned when you first got your license.

As others have said, (once you're done riding for the day) spend some time in the evening browsing through the many useful threads here.

Keep you head on a swivel -- the cell-phonies aren't paying much attention to us.

GRM
 

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I noticed the kickstand, too... weird...

Take a motorcycle safety course. Worth everypenny. They will tell you things that will help you ride for many years.

Also, always try searching a topic before posting. With this many members, its likely someone else has already been in your shoes...

Welcome, and nice bike!
 

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For online gear I like Revzilla.com

They have great videos about a lot of what they sell.

I have no connection to them other than as a customer.
 

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The best thing you will ever do for yourself is to invest in the MSF rider course.

I was immortal as a young man, but I've learned better in the forty years that have passed since I was your age.
 

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Congrats on your bike. Agree on the MSF course, will make you a better rider. Also, if you enjoy a good read, consider getting a copy of Proficient Motorcycling by David Hough - worth it's weight in gold.

Enjoy!
 

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EX250 to DL650

DL650 is less forgiving in coming to a stop at a stop light or whatever - you need to be ZERO mph when you plant your feet (well, me anyway, I have a 30" pant inseam, on a lowered bike).

And unlike the EX250, I now always put the sidestand down and rest the bike on it before getting off the bike.
 

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I don't mean to offend, but I think there's something wrong with you guys; I find a top-heavy bike much easier to balace at slow speeds.

My wife who is just getting started also finds the wee much easier to conrol at slow speeds than the 250 she rode at the riding school; I think it's a combination of high COG and wide bars that allow for minute corrections.
I rarely put my feet down at traffic lights....
 

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The best part of bringing home a new-to-you bike is that first magical evening in the garage; cleaning, replacing the oil, coolant, air filter, flushing brake lines, lubing the chain, and other general pleasantries. It's kind of like being on a first date. Treat her right from the beginning and you can ride her hard for years. :thumbup:
 

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balance at low speeds

I don't mean to offend, but I think there's something wrong with you guys; I find a top-heavy bike much easier to balace at slow speeds.

My wife who is just getting started also finds the wee much easier to conrol at slow speeds than the 250 she rode at the riding school; I think it's a combination of high COG and wide bars that allow for minute corrections.
I rarely put my feet down at traffic lights....

I agree with all of the above - but because its taller -but if you plant your foot while stopping and have any forward motion on, your foot is swept behind you and NOT planted - leading to potential tip-over (or embarrassing tipple) if you ain't lucky. Never happened - but its much easier to replant your foot on the lowly Ninjette.
 

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DL650 - moving it around - rider on foot

one thing I have not seen discussed is how to move a bike around when not riding it.

In my garage or driveway (both level) I find it easier to have one hand on the handlebar and one hand on the grab bars (front part of rear rack) - I learn't this from a local bike rental shop.
 
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