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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, I need help... again.

When my wee was in for service they said it needed a new front tire (the rear was replaced with a Bridgestone battlewing before I bought it). I asked how much and they said $270 installed. Battlewing to match the back. I thought it was too much and decided I would wait and do it myself thinking it had plenty of life. Well I worry about everything and I want to change the tire. I found a Bridgestone battle wing on Bike bandit for $115 free shipping. I found some cheaper tires on other sites but they said it would not fit (even though it was a 110/80 19).

Who would everyone here recommend getting a front tire from?

Moral of the story I really wish I would have let them do it while it was in the shop.

thanks again everyone.
 

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I bought a "110/80R-19 (59V) Bridgestone Battle Wing BW501 front motorcycle tire" from Rocky Mountain ATV for $97.88 with free shipping last month. At the time they were the cheapest. It does vary, so shop around.

Sure beats $270. :grin2:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you Stalky Tracker, I'm headed over there right now!

Rick, me neither. I think they prey on my worry... sit back and laugh as I go from website to website lol

Thank you guys.
 

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Develop a good relationship with your local dealer so that you can ask them to fit whatever good deals you manage to find. Dont forget to make sure they balance it and maybe fit a new valve if the old one's been in a while.
 

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Manufacture dates

There is a 4 digit code stamped into all tyre side walls that tells you when they are made. Most important, you want the newest tyre you can buy. Some tyres that are being sold cheap are a year or two old, not a problem for a car tyre but significant for a bike tyre. All tyres harden as they age and slowly become less pliant and grippy as they age. New = great and grippy, bit older = not so great and less grippy especially in the wet. Check the code on the tyre, you may be buying older tyres than you think. Lower price is not always better value! Of course your riding style may not need grip to the edge of the tyres, I like maximum grip for maximum safety. You pays your money and you makes your choice.
See you out there!!:smile2:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
As far as the age is concerned that is what got me thinking about the one that is on there. Bike is an 08 and I'm pretty sure its OE. I live in a rural area and finding places to mount or purchase tires from is not easy. I called a different dealership today and never heard back. I found a local guy that will mount it and balance it for $20. I just have to pull the wheel off the bike. I think I will probably go this route.
 

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The 4 digit code is the end of the string of numbers and letters in the DOT code (for the U.S. and Canada). The 4 digits are the week and year of manufacture. For example, 0415 would be the 4th week of 2015.
 

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As far as the age is concerned that is what got me thinking about the one that is on there. Bike is an 08 and I'm pretty sure its OE. I live in a rural area and finding places to mount or purchase tires from is not easy. I called a different dealership today and never heard back. I found a local guy that will mount it and balance it for $20. I just have to pull the wheel off the bike. I think I will probably go this route.
Yup. That's the way to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all your input guys. I ended up ordering one from Rocky Mountain ATV. $108 out the door with free shipping. its supposed to be here Friday. I think I have at least a year or so of life in the one that's on there but tires are nothing to fool around with when it comes to motorcycles. I will feel better when its done. Thanks again!!
 

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I like tires. Buying from one of the major suppliers like Rocky mountain, Americanmototire, Revzilla or Kirk gets you fresh inventory as they turn it around pretty well. I've found dealers are the most likely to shovel off old stock, especially if they are a tire store that doesn't move a lot of bike tires. I change my own with the Promotion tools (about $35 ) and do a static balance using the axle shaft to spin it andstick on weights from NAPA. So far it works fine up to 80MPH I've been doing it that way for years with no problems.
 
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