StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
2012 650
I just replaced the fork seals and dust seals. The left leg had been a little weepy and the "seal mate" trick did not help.
I thought I did a proper job of the replacement but the left fork is basically gushing oil. The right fork, less so.
I pried the dust seal up for a look and fork seal is still in place with the clip secure. The gap under the dust seal is filled with oil.
Backstory...
About a year ago I redid the front suspension adding emulators and stiffer springs. I did the work myself. I didn't replace the seals at that time because they seemed ok. I felt totally confident doing this replacement but I've mucked it up.
What have I done wrong?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
574 Posts
2012 650
I just replaced the fork seals and dust seals. The left leg had been a little weepy and the "seal mate" trick did not help.
I thought I did a proper job of the replacement but the left fork is basically gushing oil. The right fork, less so.
I pried the dust seal up for a look and fork seal is still in place with the clip secure. The gap under the dust seal is filled with oil.
Backstory...
About a year ago I redid the front suspension adding emulators and stiffer springs. I did the work myself. I didn't replace the seals at that time because they seemed ok. I felt totally confident doing this replacement but I've mucked it up.
What have I done wrong?
Your new fork seal is bad or was damaged during install. Get another one
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Out of curiosity - what brand did you buy? Only thing I ever have used is whatever All Balls provides. Some here seem to have an issue with them, but so far, so good on the bikes I have put them on - and I can typically get them off amazon
Ordered off Amazon as All Balls although they arrived in generic packaging but with the correct All Balls part number. Seller confirmed they were the correct part.
I am wondering if the is some chance I installed them (or one of them) backward?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
I've used All Balls and the first set lasted a few months but the second set is still going strong after 10,000 km. The second set I took more time cleaning and buffing the tubes prior in install. They have a "right side up" so be sure to check that you get them in the correct way.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
574 Posts
Ordered off Amazon as All Balls although they arrived in generic packaging but with the correct All Balls part number. Seller confirmed they were the correct part.
I am wondering if the is some chance I installed them (or one of them) backward?
It would be awful hard to accidentally put one in backwards (upside down). But if you did it would be easy to see by taking off the dust caps.

Could just be an out of spec batch or it got nicked putting it on, but if they did not come in AllBalls packaging then I would suspect fake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
If you installed one upside down it will leak, a lot.
The other possibility is that the tube on that side is nicked. You should always carefully inspect the tubes and lightly buff them with extra fine steel wool.
I have it all apart again and I'm now quite sure I had installed them both upside down. We'll see how this goes...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,159 Posts
The lip points up, they are designed to only hold back oil one way.

How easy did the seal fit into the lower leg ?

I once changed a seal on a friends Glee and the seal fitted into the leg far to easily, it leaked.

I have done many many seals in my lifetime so I knew it was a mechanical fault not a fitting fault.

Turned out to be a Wee seal and it was not a good fit in a Glee leg.

For a few years now I have been putting a strip of green kitchen scourer between the oil seal and the dust seal on my bikes.

It keeps the crud out of the oil seal, it cured a persistent weep my V2 had.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Too late to mention now, but. I always put a little grease in the seal void/cavity of any seal I'm replacing.
Thanks. I followed the service manual procedure and I think I did everything right. I just got the orientation of the seal wrong the first time. The design was slightly different from the (presumably) OEM ones which threw me off. I watched a video later which explained the logic of fork seal design and suddenly it all made sense and I could see what I did wrong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,159 Posts
I don't allow any grease near my seals, grease is to slow moving and can cause the seal lip to distort if it gets on the inner fork tube.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
690 Posts
I don't allow any grease near my seals, grease is to slow moving and can cause the seal lip to distort if it gets on the inner fork tube.
We shall both do it our way,then. I have no problem accepting your theory, but I've never had a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,159 Posts
You can test it.

Put some fork oil on the fork tube then try to very quickly run your hand or a old oil seal down the tube to wipe the oil off.

Then do the same with grease.

You hand or the seal will stick and slide very slowly when testing the grease.

When you watch a fork move the movements are very very quick, you can't have something that slows it down like grease.

The lip of the seal can easily turn inside out making it useless and picking up more crud when the movement is reversed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,892 Posts
Both methods by posted Solo and Rolex work for any DIY guy. As long as the amount of grease applied is minimal. I myself prefer to make use of a light smear of fork oil on the new fork seal, prior to installation and any excess cleared off. I was taught that a very lightly lubed seal, slides into place easier on an installation, than a dry seal into a dry tube. But then, each to his own apprenticeship training / experience... what works for one might not work for another. Key is not to fit the fork seals at an angle where it can do damage to the new seal during installation. Make sure that you have the correct size seals. Work carefully and you should be good to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,228 Posts
"I myself prefer to make use of a light smear of fork oil on the new fork seal, prior to installation and any excess cleared off. "

Seals can be interesting. The main seal on BMW Airhead motors suggests soaking the new seal in oil for a while, several days?,before installing. And position the new seal to not ride in the same groove, if there is one, as the original seal.
I follower Black Labs tutorial when doing my forks, I installed one upside down but caught myself at that and used the vice to tap the seal back out, along with a torch to heat up the lower fork tube.
Those little learning episodes can be a bother. The fork hasn't leaked or weeped since.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
My experience with LeakProof® fork seals is that they aren't. On my KZ and my ZX, they leaked within 3,000mi. (I'm a charter member of the Slow Learners Club). I found the OEM seals were cheaper, easier to install, and didn't leak. I put about 21,000 mi on the replacement OEM seals with no leaking before I traded in the bike.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top