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Discussion Starter #1
I have a new DL650 and I'm current doing the break-in period (staying under 5k RPMs for 600 miles).

How important is the break-in period? Are there people that haven't done the break-in, any adverse effects? I'm not really itching to floor the throttle but the limitation is a bit constricting.

Also, I'm smelling lot of strange smells from the bike, which I assume is normal.

It also, for the first few rides, had a tendency to make kind of "pop" and "wheeze" after turning it off. Anyone else experienced this?

Thanks.
 

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I have a new DL650 and I'm current doing the break-in period (staying under 5k RPMs for 600 miles).

How important is the break-in period? Are there people that haven't done the break-in, any adverse effects? I'm not really itching to floor the throttle but the limitation is a bit constricting.

Also, I'm smelling lot of strange smells from the bike, which I assume is normal.

It also, for the first few rides, had a tendency to make kind of "pop" and "wheeze" after turning it off. Anyone else experienced this?

Thanks.
once you have a couple of heat cycles on the motor just ride it normally.
 

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The smells are normal. Just enjoy the new bike smell.
As for break in - you will probably get lots of opinions on that :mrgreen:
but I would follow the manual.
 

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The two schools of thought are to A) follow the manual, B) run the engine hard (the "mototune method"), personally I think both are wrong.

I trust the method used in the aviation world for the better part of the last 8 decades, including military engines, very high dollar general aviation engines, and even higher dollar aviation race engines. Its tried, true and helps with reliability and performance.

1) allow engine to warm up (to touch)
2) avoid extended idle
3) avoid high temps
4) keep the engine under load
5) vary RPM's
6) do not "lug" the engine
7) do not use "engine braking"

The purpose of an engine "brake-in" is simply to seat the rings, most of this takes place in the first 3-4 hours of the engines operation. In order for this to happen you need to keep the engine under load so that the rings stay pressed against the cylinder walls.

I typically run engines in with the RPM's in the 60-80% range for short periods of time (5-10min), followed by "cooling periods" down in the 40-50% range, then repeat over and over for the first few hundred miles.


BTW, where did you get your Wee? Ive been looking for an ABS 07 here in Burque for a while but no dice, so Im waiting for the 08's.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The two schools of thought are to A) follow the manual, B) run the engine hard (the "mototune method"), personally I think both are wrong.

I trust the method used in the aviation world for the better part of the last 8 decades, including military engines, very high dollar general aviation engines, and even higher dollar aviation race engines. Its tried, true and helps with reliability and performance.

1) allow engine to warm up (to touch)
2) avoid extended idle
3) avoid high temps
4) keep the engine under load
5) vary RPM's
6) do not "lug" the engine
7) do not use "engine braking"

The purpose of an engine "brake-in" is simply to seat the rings, most of this takes place in the first 3-4 hours of the engines operation. In order for this to happen you need to keep the engine under load so that the rings stay pressed against the cylinder walls.

I typically run engines in with the RPM's in the 60-80% range for short periods of time (5-10min), followed by "cooling periods" down in the 40-50% range, then repeat over and over for the first few hundred miles.
Thanks for the advice... this seem more manageable than a strict 5k RPM cap. Typically, I've been letting the bike warm up for about 5 minutes before riding it then keeping the revs under 5k, but accelerating is a constant throttle, shift, throttle, shift, ...

BTW, where did you get your Wee? Ive been looking for an ABS 07 here in Burque for a while but no dice, so Im waiting for the 08's.
I got it from the R&S on Lomas (between Eubank and Wyoming). When we initially starting dealing they thought they had an DL650AK7 in stock at a west side store. The deal they gave me was contingent on that fact... they later figured out that the bike they had on the west side wasn't actually an ABS model. Since they had already agreed to the deal they (supposedly) took a hit and shipped it from Arizona. The manager of that R&S claimed that it was one of the last 2 ABS 07s in the southwest (possibly the U.S., I don't remember exactly what he said).

Anyway, it's a sweet bike, I'm trying to break it in as fast as I can, only logged 90 miles so far.
 

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How long ago did you make this deal with R&S? The reason I ask is that the non-abs 07 on the west side was sold about month ago and they have not gotten another one in yet. They supposedly have been trying to find me an ABS for the 3 weeks, seems like you got my bike.... maybe I smell bad? :mrgreen:


IMHO your letting your engine idle too long, 5 minutes is allot. All it needs is to be warm to the touch so 1-2 minutes is plenty, then ride it easy until your up to NOT. Extended idle can glaze the cylinders in short order.
 

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Read and be enlightened...

Motoune Break-in Method

The method described in your manual serves no one but the corporate lawyers at Suzuki.


However, since you've put 90 miles on it, you've essentially missed your opportunity to use the Mototune method.
Almost exactly how I did it on mine. Got it warmed up a bit, got it out the dealer and was up to about 7500-8000 rpm in the next 300 ft. It is now up to 19 000km ( about 12 000 miles ). Runs great with absolutely no oil consumption and I change oil every 6000 km (close to 4000 miles). One thing he doesnt say is the fact that the new watercooled engines have much more constant temperatures thus, they tend to generate much less variations in tolerances. Go ahead, rev that little mill!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
How long ago did you make this deal with R&S? The reason I ask is that the non-abs 07 on the west side was sold about month ago and they have not gotten another one in yet. They supposedly have been trying to find me an ABS for the 3 weeks, seems like you got my bike.... maybe I smell bad? :mrgreen:
The deal went down 2 weeks ago -- actually got the bike two days ago. Waiting for the 08s is probably your best bet. Every dealer I went to in town said ABS models where in short supply this time of year (since ABS models are manufactured in smaller quantities?).

I was surprised when R&S said had the bike... though they didn't actually :), but their mistake was my gain. I guess contractual obligation makes bikes more easily found.
 

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Break-in instructions

Brand new motorcycles and new girl friends should be broken-in like your gonna use them...........so throw your legs over her (it) ride it like it's stolen.:twisted::twisted:

Just a gentle warning.......be careful..........because your facial muscles may suffer from the constant smile during your ride.:p
 

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I followed the suggestions in the owner's manual and mine still runs like new at 23,000 miles. I only have one question for those that disagree. Who provides the warranty, the manufacturer, or some guy with a web site.

It's your bike--ride it as you like.
 

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I am not going to add to the break-in debate.

I think it is funny how people refer to high mileage and the effectiveness of their respective methods.

If this were a car, one would consider 23000 miles low and would not expect or tolerate problems at that point.

Why do we have such low expectations of our bikes?

With regular oil changes and routine maintenance, I fully expect 120,000+ miles (200,000+ kms) out of my 650. I believe these kinds of mileages will provide more useful data on the effectiveness of our break-in.

I used the method described in the manual. I will know in 160,000 kms if I made a mistake.

Blessings,

Christopher.
 

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I only have one question for those that disagree. Who provides the warranty, the manufacturer, or some guy with a web site.
Who provides the warranty on a $30,000-$100,000 (plus) aircraft engine?
Who accepts liability when said engine fails and people are killed?



BTW, the basis for the "mototune" method was created long before he was even born, it was taken directly from the aircraft industry. He simply added the engine braking nonsense (which causes ring-flutter among other things) and the sudden/abrupt operational aspects that build up heat fast.
 

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It seems like if break-in were such a critical step, it should be done at the factory. Everyone does it a little different and the bikes continue to run fine.

I also believe with today's precision milling and machining, internal components need not mesh together as they did in yester-year. They are built to such close specs that they are extremely closely matched to begin with.

my $00.02
 

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It seems like if break-in were such a critical step, it should be done at the factory.
In the aviation world it is, its called run-in, and it usually lasts 1-2 hours in a test cell. The next 25 hours is done by the customer, although many pay for it to be done by the factory or a certified mechanic, either way it is very critical and very specific. The difference between the aircraft industry and the moto/auto industry is that with the latter they sell more service/parts, with the former someone dies and the family sues.

With regard to tolerances and such, one has to remember that brake-in strictly concerns the rings mating with cylinder walls, there really isn't anything else that gets "broken-in".
 

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Often, part of new engine testing prior to delivery is a full range dynamometer test. I'll bet our engines have gone through their paces before they are installed in the chassis.
 

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Often, part of new engine testing prior to delivery is a full range dynamometer test. I'll bet our engines have gone through their paces before they are installed in the chassis.
I believe its true....ever noticed the color of the exhaust pipe under the engine even when the bike is in the showroom? They run the engine at the factory. For it to get this color, they dont keep it under 5000 rpm!
 

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Perhaps I’m a bit cynical, but I wouldn’t be surprised if the break-in information in the manual was written by the manufacturer’s attorney. Sounds like a good way to keep the new owner from doing anything stupid llike pinning open before he has had a little time to get used to the bike. It's kind of like making teenagers drive with their parents a certain amount of time before they drive solo.
 

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Perhaps I’m a bit cynical, but I wouldn’t be surprised if the break-in information in the manual was written by the manufacturer’s attorney. Sounds like a good way to keep the new owner from doing anything stupid llike pinning open before he has had a little time to get used to the bike. It's kind of like making teenagers drive with their parents a certain amount of time before they drive solo.
ditto :cool:
 
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