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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
OK, I know I'm going to start a "contentious" thread here, but here goes anyway..........


I just finished a 6300 mile trip. from the Seattle area through Mainland Mexico and Baja. IMHO, the brakes are, well let's just say". "Sub-optimum". (I'll leave my real feelings aside. :-O ). I've just ordered a set of new Honda 2003 CBR600F4 4-pots for the front from on online parts house, and SS cables, sintered pads, a banjo bolt for the reservoir, and caliper adapters from SV Racing Parts. I could have gotten used calipers easily on eBay, however I looked into the cost of buying new pistons and seals, any maybe some replacement bolts, and if I ended up having to do that, I'd be right back at the cost almost of the new calipers. Yes, it's going to be an expensive upgrade, especially since I've already got about 4K into farkles now, but it'll be worth it IMO.

Contact SV Racing and he has a list of all the Nissin and Tokio calipers that will fit using his adapters.

I'll update this thread when I get the project done. I figure this is going to be a 7 pot coffee job on the coffee pot level of difficulty scale.
 

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Too bad Suzuki doesn't use the front end of the Vstrom 1000 on the 650: Upside down forks, and radially mounted much better calipers.

Hope you can post pics of your installation process.
 

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I went with name brand sintered pads and stainless lines and I'm quite pleased with the bite I'm getting. They're not to the level my 2010-era BMWs were, but I'd call my stopping power "good". Install was straight forward. No biggie.
 

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If you like the bike and plan to keep it, there is no better upgrade.

I have done the pad upgrade. It is better. But not in the same league as the 4 pot calipers.

What few negative results are, in my opinion, due to not bleeding the system properly. The hard part is the master cylinder/banjo bolt area to give up the air trapped there. It took me a few days, each day just a little better. I think those that "push" brake fluid in from the caliper may have the secret to doing this right. I will try that next time. Stock master cylinder works fine....once system is bled properly.
 

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Good brakes, and a loud horn, save lives!
 

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"What few negative results are, in my opinion, due to not bleeding the system properly. The hard part is the master cylinder/banjo bolt area to give up the air trapped there."

The very 1st GSXR750 I flushed brakes on dealt me a fit for 10 minutes of bleeding. Then..under a boot on the master cylinder before than junction..was a bleeder screw. Bled it there and all was immediately great. I always crack open the lines 1st at the master cylinder, then at any junctions to the caliper, then at the caliper, and finish bleeding at the bleeder screw. But it would have been great to have a dedicated bleeder screw on the master cylinder itself.
 

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One of those banjo fasteners with a built in bleeder would be a nice upgrade when changing lines!
 

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Very interested in the final outcome. Did you go with Nissin or Tokico calipers? Is one better than the other?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Nope, it was a toss-up. I figure any 4-pot from a Honda CBR is going to work just fine, or any sport bike for that matter.
 

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Note on bleeding, I just rebuilt my stock calipers front and rear on my 50k mile 2007 DL650. Bleeding the rear is easy, the fronts however are troublesome. After using my Snap-on hand pump vacuum bleeder I could only get a spongie (sp) feel, yet it did brake a bit. Rather than spend time and frustration on the project I rode carefully to the local shop and used their MityVac, I was bleed out in 5 minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Note on bleeding, I just rebuilt my stock calipers front and rear on my 50k mile 2007 DL650. Bleeding the rear is easy, the fronts however are troublesome. After using my Snap-on hand pump vacuum bleeder I could only get a spongie (sp) feel, yet it did brake a bit. Rather than spend time and frustration on the project I rode carefully to the local shop and used their MityVac, I was bleed out in 5 minutes.
I have a compressed air vacuum bleeder, and it's worked fine bleeding brakes on my Corvette. Hopefully that'll work for me. I've also heard that putting the new fluid in at the calipers and pushing it up thru the system (to include the ABS pump) and up into the reservoir works better. But I'd have to find some kind of hand pump to do this.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
This is what I'm planning on doing. Obviously not the same as I'll have installed new calipers so the system will be empty of course.

 

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I changed my front brake lines a few weeks ago and had zero issues with trapped air by pulling the fluid down with my Mityvac-style pump.

You can put it on side stand and cocked the bars slightly left to tilt down the hose from the master cylinder. Wiggle the lever a few times and any air will bubble out. However, this step wasn't even necessary for me. I got an instant firm lever.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I changed my front brake lines a few weeks ago and had zero issues with trapped air by pulling the fluid down with my Mityvac-style pump.

You can put it on side stand and cocked the bars slightly left to tilt down the hose from the master cylinder. Wiggle the lever a few times and any air will bubble out. However, this step wasn't even necessary for me. I got an instant firm lever.
I ordered a banjo bleeder along with the other stuff so that should help.
 
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