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Just wondering how many riders out there have any sort of training behind them? Over the last few years I've attended various road focused training sessions, largely as a result of enrolling my teenage son and then going along on the course with him. I have to say that after every session I've come out with some little extra insight or new thought even though this was not my expectation.

Some instructors focused solely on fast cornering while others seemed more interested in identifying hazards. It was really interesting getting the different views from various instructors even though they didn't always agree. Whatever their opinion, I came out of each session knowing that my son was now a little more prepared for life on two wheels and that maybe a little bit had rubbed off on me too.

Yep, I'm all in favour of rider training.
 

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old dog

Have rode a lot with no breaks since the 60s.Main means of transportation since 1973. When in my early 60s my SNL got his first motorcycle.He had rode other friends a little before.Of the lots of people rode with over the years a lot of them were new riders. The ones that had taken the beginner corse really Impressed me.Told my SNL that if he would take the course I would take it with him.He agreed and it was a three day course. First two days storms around and he wanted to take his truck.
On the second day we started real riding on the small 125-200 bikes.We did it one at a time with all the 14 in my class looking on.One was older than me by a year.After my turn I set down on the long bench with others to watch next one.One of the teacher's came over and sat down by me at the end away from others by ten feet. He leaned in and said"You ride really good!Do you own a bike?" I did not say yes I have ten :grin2:.Just said yes I do thank you.Two did not pass one was the year older than me,they let them do it again free if they want.
Last day we rode the bikes the 50 miles to the test and was on my 1700 RoadStar. Same teacher came over and said"You have a big bike. Really it did make me feel good that he thought I rode good. Did not really learn any thing new but did see easy how rusty I had become.The old look ahead not right in front of you was the main one I had not been doing as well on as in sport bike days.To me would be a good idea to make all riders take at least the first course for safe part more than any thing.
 

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A track day, with race-track lessons, was an eye-opening experience for me. Having ridden for 50+ years, I knew nearly everything....I thought. Bikes are amazing now with what they can do and lessons on a track help you understand that. A safety course would be a good idea for me as a refresher. I need to look into that.

I learned something from uTube the other day. There is a fine line between scraping the footpegs and losing control due to grinding hard parts under there. I scraped real hard the other day with my wife on the back while playing with some guys on a group ride. I since realized how close that likely was to going down. I know she would never have gotten on again had I crashed. Moral: confidence is good. Overconfidence is an accident waiting to happen.
 

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A track day, with race-track lessons, was an eye-opening experience for me. Having ridden for 50+ years, I knew nearly everything....I thought. Bikes are amazing now with what they can do and lessons on a track help you understand that. A safety course would be a good idea for me as a refresher. I need to look into that.

I learned something from uTube the other day. There is a fine line between scraping the footpegs and losing control due to grinding hard parts under there. I scraped real hard the other day with my wife on the back while playing with some guys on a group ride. I since realized how close that likely was to going down. I know she would never have gotten on again had I crashed. Moral: confidence is good. Overconfidence is an accident waiting to happen.
Did that once on my old Honda Shadow on a right turn . . . The bottom of the exhaust pipe does not have a lot of traction . . .
 

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I didn't start riding until I was 45. I'm enough of a klutz that I knew there was no way I should ride without taking the Basic Rider Course. Now, after 3 bike-less years and having just gotten a new V-Strom, I'm signing up for a "refresher" course. Whether it's motorcycles or any other part of my life, I don't ever plan on not learning new things.
 

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I took the basic MSF course here with my wife in 2004 (I think, maybe 05) and it was really helpful. I had ridden for years but without the endorsement on my license. My wife had never sat on a bike by herself before the class. One classroom session, one full day of course instruction, then a half day with a road test at the end.

At the time I had a KLR650 and an XT225 which my wife would come to ride after passing the course. She started the class as one of five ladies and was the only one to pass. A couple of guys dropped out too.

Heve wrecked a few times but not serious. Mostly because I was young and dumb. Not so young anymore and could still learn a few things. The MSF course is beneficial no matter what vehicle you operate. Highly recommended! Been wanting to take the Lee Parks Total Control Advanced Riding Class but haven't gotten to yet.
 

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Training

I have been playing with Motorcycles since 1950 I was a long time desert rider. Started riding sport bikes in the early eighties, I signed up for the Keith Code superbike class in the late eighties and again in the early nineties level 4 on both times. The Street Master program a little later. Mans got to know his and the Motorcycle limitations. One of my Grand sons started riding about 5 yrs. ago he rode behind me for a month, I paid his entry fee for the Street Master program money well spent. This last Summer my Son and Grandson and I went on a 3000 mi. trip
Great Memories...For a 82 year old Rider..:thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
A track day, with race-track lessons, was an eye-opening experience for me.
Yep, we did a track day after one of the training courses, as safe a way as you can get to push the limits. I rode a 125 so got left behind on the straights but had just the best fun catching everyone through the twisties. Recommended.
 

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I took the MSF course a while back after riding safely and rapidly for ten years. I went in with an open mind, learned a lot, and corrected some bad habits. I also set what the instructors claimed was the World Record speed through the lane change test, pushing the utmost limits of the frame, wheels, and tires on those crappy little 125cc Suzukis they used to use.

The quote was: "That was hilarious, and well done. Please don't do it again."

>:)

I've also taken the Lee Parks Total Control Riding course, along with the refresher practice day. It made a huge improvement in my riding, and made me a much safer rider.
 

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Basic rider's course is very useful. However there is no substitute for miles logged. What I am curious though, has anyone significantly benefited from advanced rider course? I am sure it helps in some way, but for a rider that is not taking much of sharp cornering to begin with.. is there a benefit greater lets say than 10K real life miles or so?
 

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I know that many of the states use the MSF test (slow-speed test) as the test for your licence, right?

Here in BC, you get your learners with a written test. That lest you ride supervised (a fellow fully-licenced rider on a second bike, or one with their endorsement in a car), from sunrise to sunset, not exceeding 60km/h (35 mph), no passengers. Once you pass the MSF test from an accredited school, you get your 2nd learners, which removes only the speed restriction.

You then have up to one year to do a full road test, where the licencing officers follow you in a van, and radio your next instruction to you. That ride is about 30-40 minutes. I did mine in March, passed the first time, and it felt spectacular. Honestly, we have a lot of motorcycles here in BC because of the often good riding weather. I'm kind of glad that the nanny state puts such emphasis on riding skills, both slow and on-road.

That said, I'd love to do advanced rider training.
 

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Just The basic MSF for me. Then didn’t right for almost a year when I test drove a bike. I totally understand not letting people test drive. It’s annoying but i totally understand.

Looking for an advanced course near St. Louis. Been riding about a year now here and there. 500 miles or so, so far. Just got the v strom


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Approaching retirement age and on the back of a 15year break from biking, last year I bought my new 650XT (yeh I know.... mid-life crisis etc. etc.)
Although I had many years experience on my VFR750 commuting and touring, I never had any ‘official’ training.
Now fast forward to life on my 650XT (unashamedly seduced after watching Ewan and Charlie’s adventures), I want to master techniques which I’m likely to meet while I’m investigating my island province of Palawan ( lots of sandy, gravel roads)!
However riding courses and off-road training don’t exist here, so it’s a case of ‘learn it yourself’ .
First on my list...... being able to master the tight U-turn.
Yes I know..... I’ve watched the numerous YouTube videos, but they can never prepare for that moment when you have the weight of the bike inside your wheels and you’re calmly told to shift your weight off your seat in the opposite direction!
So I guess I just find a big space.... start with big turns, and slowly get them tighter and tighter until my confidence is up!
After I’ve mastered that, it’s onto the off-road stuff.
I guess my crash bars and panniers are going to get a few battle scars!
Wish me luck.


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Basic rider's course is very useful. However there is no substitute for miles logged. What I am curious though, has anyone significantly benefited from advanced rider course? I am sure it helps in some way, but for a rider that is not taking much of sharp cornering to begin with.. is there a benefit greater lets say than 10K real life miles or so?
10k miles isn't that much experience, that's a two week trip for some people. It's still plenty enough to develop some bad habits.
 

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I'm in the Army so they require bike training. And each base I PCS (or "move" to) in my career seems to want to be the 'safest' and usually require I take a class within 30 - 60 days of arriving there based on local policies.

That being said, I've been biking since 2009 and have taken, on average, one MSF class per year. So to keep it as fresh as possible, I do two things. I alternate between the experienced rider course and the sportbike rider course, and I (much to the chagrin of my wife), almost always take it on a new bike that I bought or traded in for...... :)

That being said, I think it's good effective training. But I consider it more learning "HOW" to practice, not that effective of a practice session. Each exercise is done for a small amount of time, and they're all on the similar place. But the exercises themselves are very good.

So I bought two dozen tennis balls, cut them all in half, and anytime I hear of someone who is a new rider in my unit, I convince them to meet me on a weekend in an empty parking lot, we set up our tennis ball obstacle course, and practice weaves, stops, u-turns, etc.

Alexi
 

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I have been driving cars since I was 17 and got my first motorcycle when I was 22. Rode that for years, on/off road. There was a long pause when I lived overseas, but got back into bikes in my 40's.

Never had an accident, car or bike. I have good road sense and constantly work on lane positions, visibility, and operation of the bike is muscle memory, just like driving a car, you have to have the skills developed.

At this point, I can't see a benefit in taking a training course. I am sure every instructor would have their own way of achieving the same things, and having that thrown into my working system I think might just confuse things. The other deciding factor for me is that courses up here are expensive, close to 1k.

It would be fun to try a track day thing, or take an enduro or offroad class.
 
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