StromTrooper banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey all,

I'm getting ready to install a 12v power outlet I bought from O'Reilly Auto Parts.





It has plenty of positive wire already to get back to the battery, but the ground wire is only 1 ft long.

Where is the best place to put that to be safely grounded? I searched a lot before asking and see I definitely don't want to ground to the frame or anything and should look for another bundle of ground wires and go into that.

Any suggestions? Or am I better off splicing in more wire and running it with the positive back to the negative battery post?

BTW, the outlet fits perfectly in between the cable-stay bracket.



(Obviously not tightened down yet. But a perfect fit in there.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
Run both wires all the way to the battery, with an appropriate fuse.

Not to discourage you, but that style receptacle gets pretty rusty pretty quickly. Just my experience, but I ride in the rain, winter salt, and live in a salt air environment. YMMV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
OK, I thought that might be the answer. Anyone else feel free to jump in.

But while I have you experts, I'll come right out and say I'm not an electrical guy and have never played with wiring before.

What do I need to do to add additional wire to the black... and inline a fuse to the positive... and put terminal rings on the ends.

Am I stripping down to bare wire and using crimpers for all of those uses ? Is that secure enough? Wrap electrical tape around the crimpers to protect them?

Also, what's the best way to run the wires back to the battery? Do I need to remove the gas tank?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
517 Posts
Not a fan of crimped connections. I solder most all connections I make. I'd use heatshrink instead of electrical tape. When you run the wiring make sure it doesn't rub on sharp edges anywhere or touch any hot engine parts. As mentioned, run both wires to the battery with an inline fuse as close to the battery as possible.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,722 Posts
Go by Radio Shack or any good auto parts store. Pick up some wiring terminals like This to go to the battery posts. Make sure the space between the lugs is large enough to get around the bolt on the battery posts and small enough that the head of the bolt will still clamp down on it.

Get a fuse holder like This and a 10 amp fuse to fit it.

Get some split tubing like This to protect the wiring.

Get some #14 (minimum size) red and black wire.

Splice the fuse holder into the positive side of the power outlet. Splice a piece of red #14 wire on the other end long enough to get to the positive post on the battery. End the wire with a spade lug.

Splice a piece of black #14 wire on the negative side of the power connector. It should be long enough to reach the negative post of the battery. Crimp a spade lug to the battery end of that wire as well.

Push the split tubing over the wires and run them under the tank to the battery.

Loosen the bolt on the negative battery post enough to slide the spade lug under the nut, and tighten it back down. Do the same with the positive battery post.

Job done.

FWIW I never use crimped connections either and solder all my connections. Not everyone can properly solder connections though, and crimped is better than just twisted and taped.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,417 Posts
A lot depends on the crimper you use, as well.

Soldering is better than using a cheapo crimper.

But connections made with a proper crimper are stronger and more reliable than soldered connections. Fast, too!



These crappy things are depressingly common, but completely useless. Might as well use Scotch Loks:



What you want are ratcheting crimpers, like these:



More crimper info:
http://www.easternbeaver.com/Main/Stuff/Faqs/DIY_Page/diy_page.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,564 Posts
Go by Radio Shack or any good auto parts store. Pick up some wiring terminals like This to go to the battery posts. Make sure the space between the lugs is large enough to get around the bolt on the battery posts and small enough that the head of the bolt will still clamp down on it.

Get a fuse holder like This and a 10 amp fuse to fit it.

Get some split tubing like This to protect the wiring.

Get some #14 (minimum size) red and black wire.

Splice the fuse holder into the positive side of the power outlet. Splice a piece of red #14 wire on the other end long enough to get to the positive post on the battery. End the wire with a spade lug.

Splice a piece of black #14 wire on the negative side of the power connector. It should be long enough to reach the negative post of the battery. Crimp a spade lug to the battery end of that wire as well.

Push the split tubing over the wires and run them under the tank to the battery.

Loosen the bolt on the negative battery post enough to slide the spade lug under the nut, and tighten it back down. Do the same with the positive battery post.

Job done.

FWIW I never use crimped connections either and solder all my connections. Not everyone can properly solder connections though, and crimped is better than just twisted and taped.
What he said:fineprint: Dude knows his stuff!:yesnod: Try to tie the wire runs down to something solid with Zip Ties if you can to take the strain of the weight of the wire off the connectors. If you solder you MUST use electronic solder not plumbing solder. (Rosin core flux solder.) Don't worry if you melt the plastics on the spade lugs, they can be covered with shrink tube or the split tube. +1 for ratcheting crimpers if you go that way.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,722 Posts
A lot depends on the crimper you use, as well.

Soldering is better than using a cheapo crimper.

But connections made with a proper crimper are stronger and more reliable than soldered connections. Fast, too!
My problem with crimped connections is not so much the mechanical strength, although poorly-crimped connections have nearly zero mechanical strength, it's that the wire strands oxidize and eventually corrode. Soldering, when done properly, flows between the strands and seals them.

Lead, when you get right down to it, is a lousy conductor with a much higher characteristic resistance than most any other metal. I normally use Radio Shack 2% Silver Solder which has a lower resistance due to the slight silver content but still melts at about the same temperature as lead.

When I use terminals, virtually all the time, I normally crimp them and then solder the crimp.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,722 Posts
What he said:fineprint: Dude knows his stuff!:yesnod: Try to tie the wire runs down to something solid with Zip Ties if you can to take the strain of the weight of the wire off the connectors. If you solder you MUST use electronic solder not plumbing solder. (Rosin core flux solder.) Don't worry if you melt the plastics on the spade lugs, they can be covered with shrink tube or the split tube. +1 for ratcheting crimpers if you go that way.
Been there, done that, smelled the solder for around 45 years or so.

You are right about rosin core solder. Do NOT use acid core solder for wiring. Tried that once to and the results were less than favorable ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
331 Posts
"Lead, when you get right down to it, is a lousy conductor with a much higher characteristic resistance than most any other metal. I normally use Radio Shack 2% Silver Solder which has a lower resistance due to the slight silver content but still melts at about the same temperature as lead."

Electronics solder is only 37% lead and 63% tin, silver solder is really unnecessary.
The guy that posted the ratcheting crimpers is spot on, a good crimp is quite reliable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
387 Posts
Always to battery. Alloy frames do not heart current. Remeber high school chemistry where you run current through two metals and react with one another? Yeeeeah.

I resisted soldering for ages, then finally decided to give it a try when I wanted a nice homemade harness for my lights/horns. I tried it out and finished... then promptly went back and soldered/wrapped/shrinktubed everything I'd previously done. It makes the connections cleaner/smaller, and in the case of my voltmeter I get more accurate readings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,283 Posts
personally I wouldn't run either wire directly to the battery unless it was the ONLY electrical accessory I had

negative should go to an accessory grounding block that is mounted somehere on plastic with no electrical connection to the frame and a wire from it to the negative on the battery

positive should go to an auxillary fuseblock and then from there to the battery either with a relay switched circuit or a hot circuit

that allows you to add additional electrical accessories without having a rats nest on your battery

+1 on ratcheting crimpers, also make sure the terminals you get are for the correct guage wire, even with the best crimpers, if you try shoving a 12ga wire into a red termial, it will come loose as will a 18ga wire in a yellow terminal



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top