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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

I recently installed 3/4" lowering links out back, and dropped the front end the same 3/4". Working great, feet now flat on the ground and a bit easier to mount and dismount.

But the side stand is holding the bike up too high. There is lean, but I can literally tip the bike over on its right side by simply pressing down on the right saddlebag, or getting on the bike with a bit too much vigor- almost lost it one day just getting on! (Haven't let it fall, but it takes very little effort to get it to go over.) I've got Pelican 1440's out in the back, total system is estimated to be putting another 55 pounds onto the rear end. Just that weight compresses the suspension a little bit, which compounds the bike wanting to lean back over to the right with such little effort as the side stand stands the bike up farther as the suspension is compressed. (Would adjusting the rear shock to firm it up help me here? What would I be adjusting, and where- knob or shock body?)

I need to shorten the side stand. I'm going to search for a second hand side stand and modify it. I want to keep the stocker in stock shape, just in case...

Now, outside of simple arithmetic, I can't do any advanced math. At first blush, I'd want to shorten the side stand 3/4" just like I did for the suspension, but something in my brain is telling me 3/4" off the side stand would be too much.

I need a math brain out there- if you were shortening a side stand, how much overall length decrease would you shoot for to obtain approximately the original lean as was delivered to me by the factory?

Read message 7 of this thread- he went 3/4" shorter. Thoughts?
http://www.stromtrooper.com/forums/showthread.php?t=17974&highlight=sidestand

Thanks in advance!
 

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Hi All,

I recently installed 3/4" lowering links out back, and dropped the front end the same 3/4". Working great, feet now flat on the ground and a bit easier to mount and dismount.

But the side stand is holding the bike up too high. There is lean, but I can literally tip the bike over on its right side by simply pressing down on the right saddlebag, or getting on the bike with a bit too much vigor- almost lost it one day just getting on! (Haven't let it fall, but it takes very little effort to get it to go over.) I've got Pelican 1440's out in the back, total system is estimated to be putting another 55 pounds onto the rear end. Just that weight compresses the suspension a little bit, which compounds the bike wanting to lean back over to the right with such little effort as the side stand stands the bike up farther as the suspension is compressed. (Would adjusting the rear shock to firm it up help me here? What would I be adjusting, and where- knob or shock body?)

I need to shorten the side stand. I'm going to search for a second hand side stand and modify it. I want to keep the stocker in stock shape, just in case...

Now, outside of simple arithmetic, I can't do any advanced math. At first blush, I'd want to shorten the side stand 3/4" just like I did for the suspension, but something in my brain is telling me 3/4" off the side stand would be too much.

I need a math brain out there- if you were shortening a side stand, how much overall length decrease would you shoot for to obtain approximately the original lean as was delivered to me by the factory?

Read message 7 of this thread- he went 3/4" shorter. Thoughts?
http://www.stromtrooper.com/forums/showthread.php?t=17974&highlight=sidestand

Thanks in advance!
How about putting 3/4'' board under both tires and trying out the stand to see if you get the lean you want? Dunno if the angle thing would work out exactly right, but I think it'd go a long way in getting the info you need.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
How about putting 3/4'' board under both tires and trying out the stand to see if you get the lean you want? Dunno if the angle thing would work out exactly right, but I think it'd go a long way in getting the info you need.
Freakin' brilliant!!! See, guys, where would we be without the sharp mind of a good woman?

I will do this tomorrow evening, Janice, and report back what I discover. I'll mess around with a few different boards of different thicknesses to see what works out.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
This may not seem like a good deal to you but I've got a stock stand that has lowered itself through use. I bet it would work just right on yours, if you want to trade. I may not make it to the tech day on the Strom though since the right fork has puked all of its oil out and I need to get it in the shop for seals. The sonic springs just arrived and I should have a DL1000 shock with a new Hyperpro spring in a week or so. I may ride up on the DR.

Bob W.
Hi Bob,

Uh, sounds like you've got a well used stand strapped to that bike of yours. I don't think I'd want to swap for my nearly new one (I want to keep the current stand for future use or a new owner that may want to raise the bike in the future). Wonder how much a new one costs? I'll search around for a used one.

Anyone have one laying on a shelf that is no longer in use?

Hope to see you Saturday!
 

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Easy fix. Just grind down the stop to allow the side stand to swing forward more. Not much is needed and it will probably still be very serviceable with the stock height.
 
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How about putting 3/4'' board under both tires and trying out the stand to see if you get the lean you want? Dunno if the angle thing would work out exactly right, but I think it'd go a long way in getting the info you need.
I dunno, maybe buy a shorter bike? LOL!
 

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Easy fix. Just grind down the stop to allow the side stand to swing forward more. Not much is needed and it will probably still be very serviceable with the stock height.
Or grind down the spot on the stand where it contacts the stop. Then if you ever put the bike back up to stock height (to maybe sell it), all you need to do is replace the stand and everything is back to normal.
 

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Steve, Ron Ayers lists it for $74.22. Kinda spendy :(
 

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Steve, when I had my bike lowered one inch I ground the stops of my kickstand to let it go forward further and allow additional lean. I have removed the lowering links and traded them for something else.

Want to change kick stands on Saturday?
 

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Steve, for some reason it won't let me edit my previous post.

On Saturday you will see that the extra lean when you raise it back up is not that severe. I am willing to trade if you want. My bike only has 10,150 miles bought Dec. 06.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hi Jay,

Well, I'll take a look at what you've got. I'm hoping for a second side stand that can be modified and keeping the stocker in original form for the future. I'm funny that way, something about that Scandinavian blood in me... But I'd like to see how yours fits.

Tonight, taking Janice's idea, I put the wheels up onto 3/4" thick plywood (negating the 3/4" lowering links I installed along with the 3/4" front fork drop) and set the bike down on the side stand. MUCH more stable, without a doubt. Then twice I measured the height change between the ground and a fixed point (different fixed point each time) of the bike next to the side stand, with the bike on the plywood, and with it on the concrete floor. Each time, the height difference of the lean was 1/4". I knew something would be weird, as explained in my original post, and this verified it. (Maybe I did remember a little something from high school math class!) So, if I get a used stand somewhere, and then modify/shorten it, I'll start by taking off enough material that will equal 1/4" of change in the final product and test fit it, taking off more if needed.

One other thing I did tonight that helped was to crank up the rear suspension preload to the maximum. This didn't do anything (that I was able to tell just sitting in the garage, no test ride tonight) to harden the shock dampening ability, but it did greatly lessen (oxymoron?) the initial sag of the rear suspension when the bike sits there riderless, especially with all that heavy luggage I've got. Pressing down on the right saddlebag took greater effort to sag the rear suspension, therefore making it more stable when parked on the side stand. But I still think shortening the side stand to provide more lean will be the full answer.

nvr2old- thanks for that price check! I was going to call my local dealer tomorrow, just to see how much. Now I know, and locally it will probably be even higher than Ayers.

Any more thoughts?
 

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Steve, I understand your scandihovian tendancies, I married one. I am Bohemian though, so I get the grinder out and go to work.

Seriousely the side stand connects to a steel bracket that is held to the bike by two bolts. Take that off and grind a little off of the stops until the angle fits your liking. If you "really" want to go back to stock you could either purchase a new bracket, or get someone with a welder to build the areas back up, and then grind them to the angle that fits.
 

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Just a thought, when I raised my bike 1", I added 2.25" to the kick stand length. I seems to be almost a 2 to 1 ratio. This would hold true if the side stand is at a 45* angle. If you want to lessen the angle by the 3/4" you used the wood to measure, you will have to shorten the stand by 1.5".
 

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Hi Jay,

Well, I'll take a look at what you've got. I'm hoping for a second side stand that can be modified and keeping the stocker in original form for the future. I'm funny that way, something about that Scandinavian blood in me... But I'd like to see how yours fits.

Tonight, taking Janice's idea, I put the wheels up onto 3/4" thick plywood (negating the 3/4" lowering links I installed along with the 3/4" front fork drop) and set the bike down on the side stand. MUCH more stable, without a doubt. Then twice I measured the height change between the ground and a fixed point (different fixed point each time) of the bike next to the side stand, with the bike on the plywood, and with it on the concrete floor. Each time, the height difference of the lean was 1/4". I knew something would be weird, as explained in my original post, and this verified it. (Maybe I did remember a little something from high school math class!) So, if I get a used stand somewhere, and then modify/shorten it, I'll start by taking off enough material that will equal 1/4" of change in the final product and test fit it, taking off more if needed.

One other thing I did tonight

that helped was to crank up the rear suspension preload to the maximum. This didn't do anything (that I was able to tell just sitting in the garage, no test ride tonight) to harden the shock dampening ability, but it did greatly lessen (oxymoron?) the initial sag of the rear suspension when the bike sits there riderless, especially with all that heavy luggage I've got. Pressing down on the right saddlebag took greater effort to sag the rear suspension, therefore making it more stable when parked on the side stand. But I still think shortening the side stand to provide more lean will be the full answer.

nvr2old- thanks for that price check! I was going to call my local dealer tomorrow, just to see how much. Now I know, and locally it will probably be even higher than Ayers.

Any more thoughts?
Hi Steve,

So you're having trouble figuring out exactly how much to take off.
I have the solution. A level.

Put bike on wood plank on a level surface.

Put the level on the wood perpendicular to the bike so the end of the level is at the stand.

Mark the stand at the bottom side of the level.

Measure the distance from the bottom of the stand to the mark, along the centreline of the stand.

It'll show you exactly how much to cut off.

That way, you don't have to figure anything out mathmatically.

Easy, peasy...

So there.
 

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Just did my wife's SV last weekend. Took the lowered bike to a level dirt/gravel parking lot and dug a small hole w/ a garden trowel. Then parked the bike w/ the kickstand resting in the hole. We did trial and error until we found a correct lean angle and then measured the depth of the hole (1.5" in this case).

We then took the kickstand off the bike, took it to a welding shop who cut 1.5" out of the center (put a rod in the hollow center to join the two pieces) and rewelded the new stand that is now 1.5" shorter and has the original foot. We spray painted w/ flat black krylon and remounted it on the bike and it is works perfect.
 

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Good idea!

Just did my wife's SV last weekend. Took the lowered bike to a level dirt/gravel parking lot and dug a small hole w/ a garden trowel. Then parked the bike w/ the kickstand resting in the hole. We did trial and error until we found a correct lean angle and then measured the depth of the hole (1.5" in this case).

We then took the kickstand off the bike, took it to a welding shop who cut 1.5" out of the center (put a rod in the hollow center to join the two pieces) and rewelded the new stand that is now 1.5" shorter and has the original foot. We spray painted w/ flat black krylon and remounted it on the bike and it is works perfect.
I like your method better! Good thinking. :D
 

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Steve, how did you end up on this issue? I've lowered my wife's bike an inch and it's ready to fall over on the side stand. I can do the dig a hole thing, or the boards, but also wanted to check on your final solution.
 

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Slice & Dice

Just did my wife's SV last weekend. Took the lowered bike to a level dirt/gravel parking lot and dug a small hole w/ a garden trowel. Then parked the bike w/ the kickstand resting in the hole. We did trial and error until we found a correct lean angle and then measured the depth of the hole (1.5" in this case).

We then took the kickstand off the bike, took it to a welding shop who cut 1.5" out of the center (put a rod in the hollow center to join the two pieces) and rewelded the new stand that is now 1.5" shorter and has the original foot. We spray painted w/ flat black krylon and remounted it on the bike and it is works perfect.
That sounds like a great idea. I just bought a lowered Strom and noticed the side stand wasn't adjusted accordingly. I'm actually worried about wind tipping it over. I think I will look into your idea. Thanks!
 

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Ok I lowered my bike the exactly the same way plus I added a wide foot plate to the bottom of my kickstand and I don't have any fear of the bike falling over. When I lowered my front I was very percise and I am wondering if that is the difference or maybe my bike may have a softer setting in the front end ? Hmmmmmm. Interesting
 

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When I first lowered my Glee, I used Soupy adjustables, and got the Soupy's adjustable sidestand too. It worked great for almost a year. Then I got a centerstand, and found it wouldn't work with the adjustable links, so I happened to have some dogbone links that lowered either 5/8 or 3/4. Took off the soupy's and gave to a buddy, but now he needed a lower stand so I gave him the soupy sidestand too. So, now I have it lowered 3/4 in the front and either 5/8 or 3/4 in the rear and put my original sidestand back on. It was fine, as long as the parking place was level, or sloped away.Ran it this way for 4000 miles or so, but always had to worry about where I parked. Even at the gas stations, sometimes the slope away from the pump was steeper than I felt safe with. So, I was able to get my hands on another Soupy stand for cheap, and so ordered the Soupy wide footplate for it(which was my only complaint of the stand, the foot being so small would sink in so easy) and now I am a happy camper again.
 
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