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I spent all my money booze and hookers. Now I don't have money for heated gear. I was wondering if anyone rode in snowboard pants? I can't imagine they'd offer much abrasion resistance but I think they'd be warm enough. I'm worried though about melting part of beloved pants though. Has anyone tried this? Or found a sub $100 solution for warm hands? Leather, thinsulate, and gortex (together) don't seem to cut it for me.
 
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If you aren't rich then you need to be hard.
No two ways around it... cheap and nasty is ok if you are just scooting down to the local boozer. If you are going longer distances you need to save a few bucks to get decent gear or harden up and laugh at the cold !
Just my opinion... I'm sure somebody here will be more constructive.
(See Velominati rule no. 5)
 

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beans and rice until you can afford heated gear- there really is no substitute
Well since he brought it up, eat foods high in sugar. It will help a tad.
 

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On a budget. Been there , done that. Since you're not in a position to spend much $ , you need to tell us what you feel needs to be addressed the most. That way you might get some reasonable direction from those who have done it. I ride year round without any heated gear. This winter was a good test , rode several times in the low to mid teens , and 2 time in single digits. Unusual for the South. Thought about heated grips , but survived another winter without. So , what will it be?
 

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Buy used gear on e bay, craigslist or forums, especially ADV forum. Wear latex gloves under your riding gloves. Start eating top Ramon and peanut butter.
 

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UnderArmor-type materials are your friend......Walmart had pants on sale 2 weeks ago for $5 each. You want something skin tight to help any moisture wicking away. Cotton (as in bluejeans) is a poor cold-weather insulator.....how many snow skiers do you see wearing cotton shirts, pants, etc.......:confused:
 

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and you don't need to spend lots for name brand heated gear. Consider making your own. I saved a lot of money and learned quite a bit in the process. I knew nothing about making heated gear when I started on my vest. But I did know that I couldn't pay the price being asked by the name brand manufacturers. Google was helpful in my research on how to make it as well as how to wire the bike for it all.
 

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I used a snowmobile suit one winter in Pennsylvania many years ago. It worked OK. Buy the best gloves you can afford, and use some of the disposable hand warmers on the backs of your hands, under the gloves, of course.

Best advice is to ease up on the partying and save for some heated gear.
 

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no heated gear

So far I survive with good layering; although I'm sure I could easily get spoiled with electric gear. My layers serve double duty getting worn at night in my tent when camping.
After years of outdoor work and sports I've learned a few crucial things about what to wear.
Moisture management: it has to be sweatwicking. Nothing cotton.
Windproof: and has to be breathable
Waterproof: it has to be breathable of you get wet cold and clammy inside.

Lots of good gear is available at sensible prices; but you often get what you pay. Expensive quality fleece products like Arcteryx are fantastic and don't compare with cheap stuff. But some gear is just pricy because of the particular name brand, so be careful.
I like DriWear 85%polyester & 15% spandex and Avia 58% polyester & 35% thermolite & 7 % wool jersies. Rivers' End solar shield polyester T-shirts. Kimbi 80%Ployester & 20%merino wool long underwear. Siera Design nylon/spandex 1.5 wind rated shirt.
KLIM gortex PowerCross snowmobile gloves
From Aerostich, Olympia WindTex gloves, and a wind triangle neck warmer.
FroggToggs raingear can also be worn in cold weather as an inexpensive windproof breathable layer; they are light and easily packable.
 

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Well since he brought it up, eat foods high in sugar. It will help a tad.
putting on weight takes up layering space, do I need to explain how I know this ?


layering is cheapest and most reliable way to stay warm until it affects your range of motion, minimum thin wicking layer against the skin, insulating layer and outer shell wind barrier

disposable pocket warmers, and rag wool liners inside of choppers mitts


balaclava is a must





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90% of riding in cold weather is all about insulation with windproofing. You can wear all the insulated gear in the world, but if it's porous, it won't do you 5 minutes of good. That's why leather is really no good at keeping you warm on a bike.

To do it on the cheap, wear layered bulky clothes (sweaters, sweatshirts) and any reasonably decent rainsuit over it.

Wear a wool cap under your helmet. Pull it down over your ears. Better, use a ski mask that comes down over your neck.

Forget going overboard with bulky, heavily insulated gloves. Short of electric gloves, the most effective way to keep your hands from freezing is using bar end sleeves. The original Hippo Hands are rather on the expensive side, but nowadays you can find suitable ones that can be made to fit most bikes in the ATV market. You can even find them at places like Bass Pro Shops for around $30.

Handlebar sleeves are windproof and provide a huge dead air space between your hands and the outside wind. With sleeves on the bike, you can wear relatively lightweight gloves (like Mechanix or one of the many knock-offs) so you don't give up the tactile feel for controls and don't have to have all that slippery bulk between your hands and the grips and levers. Home Depot sells a brand of Mechanix-like gloves labeled Firm Grip. There's a particular model that is insulated and windproof, but not bulky. They are very effective when used inside handlebar muffs.

It's amazing to me how many riders have never used handlebar sleeves. Far more effective than the bulkiest ski or winter motorcycle gloves you can buy. And don't think for one minute that brush/wind guards are a comparable substitute. All that wind comes right around brush guards and blows on the back of your hands and fingertips and the cold creeps right through the gloves in no time.

Heated grips are great, and can be had for cheap, but they do nothing for the back of your hands. But the combination of grip heaters, a pair of Mechanix-like gloves inside a pair of handlebar sleeves lets you ride all day in near-freezing weather without your fingers going dangerously numb.

I discovered Hippo Hands back in the 70s when they first appeared, back when I was working at a motorcycle dealership, and have been using them (or similar) ever since. It was before that, when riding a bike year-round while in high school, that I discovered that a K-Mart rainsuit worn over my favorite turtleneck sweater was more effective than any heavy jacket I had.

Nowadays, there's a world of really good quality synthetic riding gear at reasonable prices, and I always wear jackets with joint armor. Some of the best pieces I have were bought at deep discounts at bike shows, or at the local Dealer's "bargain corner." Just like regular clothes, watch for bargains in the off-seasons. Find winter gear bargains in the summer, and vice-versa. Of the several armored jackets and one-peice suits I have, my favorite, and the one I seem to always default to is a TourMaster 3/4 length jacket with a zip-in quilted liner. I got it from the Dealer's sale bargain for around $75 as I recall. I wear it spring and fall without the liner and throughout the winter with the liner. Only on the coldest GA winter days, or when I'll be riding for a half day or so do I use one of the one-piece suits (another TourMaster model, which I got at a bike show). I have a 2-piece Fieldsheer armored mesh outfit for summer that I got at a bargain discount, too. I've never paid the $300-and-up prices for the latest/greatest riding gear.

Don't overlook the stuff at Cycle Gear, either. Some of their stuff is cheaply made, but some of it is quite good for the money, too. I've got a pair of waterproof boots there, like them fine, and wear them quite often even though I have more expensive riding shoes/boots, too. I've even bought 3 of their store-brand Bilt helmets there.

JET
 

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Buy used gear on e bay, craigslist or forums, especially ADV forum. Wear latex gloves under your riding gloves. Start eating top Ramon and peanut butter.
Got my first set of winter gear via bits and pieces at a time off eBay and various motorcycle forums. You can layer for sure, and it definitely helps, but makes mobility a problem and you feel like the Michelin Man. Stopping to pee becomes a major undertaking. But really there is no substitute for quality winter riding gear.
 

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I've never used heated gear and don't plan to. If it fails when you're in serious cold, you're in big trouble. Unless you carry alternate gear, and if you do that heated gear isn't necessary. Note the alternators on our little 650s aren't all that hefty.
 

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Do you still have the hookers' numbers?

I am a cheapskate as well (most of my money is spent on booze and paying off student loans). I bought a cheap pair of "Stearns" brand windproof / waterproof fishing pants from bass pro shops for less than $20 and wear them over jeans and long underwear. I got a scorpion insulated jacket from motorcyclecloseouts.com, and oxford heated grips. Total investment = $150. I commute to work 30 min each way and can stand it to about the upper 20s.
 

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90% of riding in cold weather is all about insulation with windproofing. You can wear all the insulated gear in the world, but if it's porous, it won't do you 5 minutes of good.
This is excellent advice, and it forms the basis of my winter riding setup.

For my legs, I wear an oversized pair of $10 trakky dax (sweat pants) over my normal pants. If it gets really cold I wear my plastic rain pants over the top of those to cut out the wind chill.

Same concept for my torso. I wear a fleecy hoody for insulation (about $20 from Kmart or Target), covered by my insulated textile riding jacket. If thats not enough I have a rain coat that covers the lot.

I don't think there is a cheap way to keep your hands warm. I continue to throw money at that particular problem. So far I have Suzuki hand guards, Oxford heated grips, the warmest gloves my local dealership stocks, and hippo hands over the lot. Still gets painfully cold.

For my neck and face I use a cheap scarf. THe problem with scarves is if they unravel and enter your wheels, well you kind of end up dead or crippled. So what I did was use a needle with some wool to sew the scarf into a "tall" tube. It has a few inches of slack for me to stuff up my helmet over my mouth. I tried a few of the professionally made neck warmers but they were all too tight and made me feel like I was being chocked, and they also couldnt enter my helmet to provide a full insulating seal.

For my feet...well they just go numb so they dont matter.
 

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There is no one size fits all answer here. Some people get cold faster than others.

I rode for 30 years in northern New England before I got my Gerbing liner and gloves about 10-15 years ago.

I wished I’d gotten it a lot sooner - and I don’t think I have ever met a rider from the north (where the riding season is short due to snow and ice) who hasn’t said the same. Heated gear typically extends the riding season on either end for most people.

Much of our motorcycle riding is very passive. We’re not moving around too much. If you are just sitting there riding down the highway with the temps in the teens you will get cold without electrics sooner or later, even on a Gold Wing. Some people might need the electrics within an hour, some people might be able to go all day. I suspect most would get cold within a couple of hours without heated gear.

If you are riding in an aggressive (non-passive) manner, moving around and using your muscles, you may not ever get cold. I used to do ice-racing when I was young with minimal insulation. Never got cold. I can still snowmobile all day in single digits and not get cold if I am riding aggressively.

But if you are just sitting there, tooling down the highway and it is well below freezing, most will get cold sooner or later without heated gear.
 
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