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I would NOT try to drill it out, you are just looking to make an inconvenience into a real problem. Try the Torx bit first. If that doesn't work there are some special low priced sockets just made to remove this sort of screw. You can find these at your local hardware store, Home Depot, Lowes, etc. Also there are lots of them listed on Amazon.
Another way is to use a center punch or a small sharp chisel and use it to break the screw loose. you just put the punch to one side, slant it in the direction you want to turn the screw and give it a few careful wacks.
I am a professional with decades of experience. I have removed more stripped screws than I would ever want to count. (Customers screwed them up and then brought them to the shop when they were hopelessly ruined! Gave me lots of practice).
Drilling is a lost resort. Its too easy to get the drill crooked in the hole and make it worse. Then you get an "easyout" down in the hole and break it off only to learn the "easyout" is made of a steel that is harder then your drill bit so your drill goes off center and crazy and then you have a real mess. I can drill a bolt clean in the center, done it many times. But....I learned this in Germany from a Master Mechanic who made you do it over and over until you could get it perfect. It takes a LOT of practice to be good at it. Even so, I find drilling to be the least desireable approach as its just too easy to screw it up.
Next time use a professional grade tool and make certain that is all the way down in the hole and is perfectly "square" with the opening. If the screw is hard to turn give it a few taps with a small hammer to break it loose.
Wish I'd got you instead of the numbskull kid that worked on my bike at the dealer last time. I replaced several fasteners - and, oh yeah, my heated grips - after he was done butchering it. :mad:
 

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And throw away your ball end wrenches. They were invented by the guy that sells easy outs.
They have their uses; those things are great for spinning out a fastener after it is loose, but FFS, don't ever apply torque with the ball end ... :oops:

More often, when I mess up a hex head bolt, it's nearly always because my hex key or socket wasn't fully seated in the bolt head.
 

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Whatever method you are using to try to free the bolt try to tighten it just a little until it breaks fee. The torque required is lower when you tighten then when you loosen. The thread geometrics are designed to be self locking, so the break open torques is higher when you untighten compared to when you tighten. I know sounds crazy but that's one of the few things I learned and remembered from the engineering class at college, and it works!
I did not know that. Interesting tidbit.
 

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Lots of good ideas here from people who have "been there and done that!".
 

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They have their uses; those things are great for spinning out a fastener after it is loose, but FFS, don't ever apply torque with the ball end ... :oops:

More often, when I mess up a hex head bolt, it's nearly always because my hex key or socket wasn't fully seated in the bolt head.
I'll sort of agree - although I do have a set of ball end impact wrenches and they work just fine. they are a better material and better machined than your standard ball end wrench.
 

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I'll sort of agree - although I do have a set of ball end impact wrenches and they work just fine. they are a better material and better machined than your standard ball end wrench.
The only type I'm familiar with are the hex keys with a ball on one end. I'm having trouble seeing why you'd ever want a ball-end impact driver ... :oops: Seems like a worst-case scenario.
 

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The only type I'm familiar with are the hex keys with a ball on one end. I'm having trouble seeing why you'd ever want a ball-end impact driver ... :oops: Seems like a worst-case scenario.
They work better than sticking a regular allen socket on a wobble. My most common use is taking half shafts off front wheel drive cars
 

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One of the bolts on the plastic trim is stripped. See picture attached. Any idea how I can get it out? It’s quite rounded and not catching at all. The bike is new to me and the more I try the more rounded it’s getting.

G'day from the land down under. Some one has obviously butchered it with the wrong sized allen key. Lots of tape around the place to avoid paint damage,
and drill it out. Suzuki chose to go for cosmetic appearane, not strength, and used a very shallow head on the bolt. It's very easy to mess it up. Other makes use a standard 8mm hex nut head. I've replaced mine with those. Costs a few cents, and much more user friendly. Happy trails
 

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One of the bolts on the plastic trim is stripped. See picture attached. Any idea how I can get it out? It’s quite rounded and not catching at all. The bike is new to me and the more I try the more rounded it’s getting.

As another has mentioned, a torx bit tapped in will usually do the job nicely. I have to do this often with allen bolts on the forklifts at work.
 

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Most of the time smacking it with a torx would be the way to go but as others have said, there is not solid metal underneath in this case.
Therefore drilling the head off the screw is the way to go. Use a bit that’s larger than the screw shank so that the head pops off. Remove the plastics. Now you can deal with the rest of the screw with a vice grip or else maybe just replace the fastener including the female part, if it’s one of the clip type deals underneath.
I use antiseize or blue or purple loctite on most screws so that this kind of thing doesn’t happen.
 

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G'day from the land down under. Some one has obviously butchered it with the wrong sized allen key. Lots of tape around the place to avoid paint damage,
and drill it out. Suzuki chose to go for cosmetic appearane, not strength, and used a very shallow head on the bolt. It's very easy to mess it up. Other makes use a standard 8mm hex nut head. I've replaced mine with those. Costs a few cents, and much more user friendly. Happy trails
Is this bolt a shouldered bolt? If it is, then using a standard hex bolt is a bad idea.
 

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I would NOT try to drill it out, you are just looking to make an inconvenience into a real problem. Try the Torx bit first. If that doesn't work there are some special low priced sockets just made to remove this sort of screw. You can find these at your local hardware store, Home Depot, Lowes, etc. Also there are lots of them listed on Amazon.
Another way is to use a center punch or a small sharp chisel and use it to break the screw loose. you just put the punch to one side, slant it in the direction you want to turn the screw and give it a few careful wacks.
I am a professional with decades of experience. I have removed more stripped screws than I would ever want to count. (Customers screwed them up and then brought them to the shop when they were hopelessly ruined! Gave me lots of practice).
Drilling is a lost resort. Its too easy to get the drill crooked in the hole and make it worse. Then you get an "easyout" down in the hole and break it off only to learn the "easyout" is made of a steel that is harder then your drill bit so your drill goes off center and crazy and then you have a real mess. I can drill a bolt clean in the center, done it many times. But....I learned this in Germany from a Master Mechanic who made you do it over and over until you could get it perfect. It takes a LOT of practice to be good at it. Even so, I find drilling to be the least desireable approach as its just too easy to screw it up.
Next time use a professional grade tool and make certain that is all the way down in the hole and is perfectly "square" with the opening. If the screw is hard to turn give it a few taps with a small hammer to break it loose.
Could you send a link to one of these sockets you mentioned? I’m not sure what to search for.
 

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Is this bolt a shouldered bolt? If it is, then using a standard hex bolt is a bad idea.
G'day again from the land down under. Definitely a "shouldered" bolt mate. I got a klr650 with lots of plastics and such. That's what they use. Got an 8mm hex head on about 12mm base. Does the same job. Use a 6 sided socket only and you can't go wrong. Anyhow, once you get it out and get a genuine replacement, it will be easy enough to work on with good tools. I know a bloke with a toolbox full of "nut fuckers". 40 year old 12 sided spanners that are worn out that he needs to replace. I reckon that's probably what caused the problem in the first place. You'll figure it out.
 

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The torx idea may work.I myself would just take my dremel and "carefully' cut a slot and work it out .BUT not everyone has a dremel. One thing about easy outs are you need to be very careful with the easy out. Break one off and then you have a new, bigger problem. Ask me how I know .
I had a brake caliper bolt on another bike that was a little seized, and totally rounded it with the socket. In the end I had to resort to grinding flats on it to allow a pair of vice grips to get enough purchase to be able to loosen it. I've still got the bolt - it's mangled AF. Was surprised my local Yamaha dealer actually had one in stock and it was only like CAD$7.

Anyway, a Dremel or similar with a variety of bits is an invaluable tool in the garage.
 
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