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Discussion Starter #1
Left fork disassembled with one sharp tug. The right seal refuses to move. Seal retainer clip is out. Bottom bolt is removed and damper rod is on the bench. When I yank on it it also sticks together and I have to bang it down on the bench to get the upper tube to slide back in. Almost like there is no washer under the seal and the bushing is sticking in the seal. Any thoughts are most welcome.
 

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If you are absolutely sure the clip is out along with the bottom bolt, keep it up. I found short, rapid slide hammer hits worked to get a couple of stubborn ones to give up. It does sound like a sticky bushing alright...
 

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BC, Ive either held the upper tube by hand, or clamped it in soft vise jaw inserts, then used a compothane hammer on the top of the lower stachion to remove the seal. The upper tube lower bushing catches on the seal to pull it out. At times Ive had to carefully distort the upper seal with a small brass punch to get it to loosen its grip in the lower stanchion seal bore.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Maz. Heading into town to grab a soft blow hammer and some inserts for the vice. Even short strokes have it sticking together. Will heat up the area with a hair dryer for a while too. Brake mount lug slid into my thumb on one hard tug and almost broke it. The chickens heard a lot of cursing!!
 

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BC, we have a store in our area, Rural King. They have the vise inserts in the tool section, about $12. 2 pairs in the kit. 1 is a set of aluminum jaws, the other is fiberg;ass-impregnated plastic. Both pairs have magnets that keep them in the vise, and both pairs have 2 positions depending on what you have and how you want it clamped. The jaws have grooves and cutouts for clamping round objects. Saves you from marring surfaces.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Checked one of the local stores online and the aluminum with rubber face is out of stock but they have a set of the plastic ones. $22 bucks up here. Will check a discount tool place on the way there. Was thinking a 2 lb dead blow and a block of wood
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Home depot Canada only had the Bessy's. But at a cheaper price than in the states. Usually it is the other way around. Will try after lunch at persuading it apart.
 

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Before I had a good fork vise I’d just clamp the tube back in the triples and then “slide hammer” the lower off.
What Rich said (always), use the triple clamps. Plus_ twist (rotate) the fork bottom. If it will not rotate use the axle bolt to rotate it and or to bang on.
 

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Ive had forks delivered to me to be rebuilt, so I didnt have a bike to clamp the upper tube in and just slide hammer it off.
Usually I just removed the dust seal and eal rtaing ring, held the upper tube in one hand and used a plastic hammer on the lower stanchion above a plywood square.
But..there have been those that were just plain stuck, and once the upper tube was clamped in soft vise jaws, it was 3 hits and done. No muss, no fuss.
I just put on the soft jaw vises and 30 seconds later the old seal is history.
I have several sizes of fork bushing installers, and have used sections of an old stanchion and PVC pipe as well as using the old seal to drive in the new seal.
The point being..whatever works for you is the way to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Something isn't right here. Tube in the vice, block of wood and a two pound dead blow hammer. Wood is deforming and seal isn't moving. Also the upper and lower jam together. I'm thinking the washer is missing from under the seal and the bushing is getting buried in the seal locking it to the fork tube. One tug on the other fork tube and it came apart.
 

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BC, I took a look at the for assembly on the MR Cycle microfiche. Yes, I can see that if the washer, Item #7 called "spacer" is missing the lower tube bushing could jam into the seal.
If you could CAREFULLY punch a hole into the seal top surface between the upper tube and lower stanchion with an ice pic and tap hammer, you could thread a brass wood screw into the seal, try a #6 X 1.5" philips head. Screw in about 3 threads, and use a pair of wire cutters to pull the seal out of the lower stanchion. You The brass wont damage the upper tubem but you have to make sure you dont damage the lower stanchion seal bore. Ive done this many times on various older Suzuki models.
 

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Just my 2 cents...

Happens too me just once. Nothing missing, the washer was there. And it's quite complicated to take the seal with everything in place, it's no meant to happen like that (also try to take the seal first...no success).

The lower bushing was getting "inside" of upper bushing. It will sort out with the right amount of pressure, then you'll see them stuck together (mine totally cleaned half of the lower bushing surface to nude metal). Lower tube and stanchion holds more impact than the bushing, no doubt about it.
 

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Did you try a little heat on it?

Another technique (Are these inverted or standard forks?), and this gets a little messy but it works. I've done this with various forks which don't have the washer or the washer to slide bushing is so sloppy that it destroys the slide bushing. Examples- KDX 200/220, IT175, IT200, etc.

Here is what you do:
Remove the spring and extend the fork about an inch or so from totally compressed. Fill the fork with fluid and replace the fork cap. Make sure you do your very best job of filling it full with minimal/no air. Then, stand the fork up and use a 2x4 or something appropriate, plus your workbench or a 2x4 screwed to the wall etc, to gain mechanical advantage. Push down on the end of the lever (2x4) to force the fork to a compressed state. Essentially, you are creating a malfunctioning hydraulic jack with an unrestrained seal.

The seal will walk right up or down, and will then come out. The seal will only come out as fast as you push, so don't be afraid that it will explode or anything deadly. And again, this can be messy so have good coverage of rags and cardboard on the floor.

Hope this helps and best luck with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Some good ideas, thanks guys. Tried heat yesterday combined with ample cursing. Will start with the hydraulic pressing and see what that does. Interesting method and I have enough odds n ends of old oil to do that. If no luck then it is off to town for brass screws and some small long drill bits. Guess I better order up a washer also just in case.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
The hydralic method worked. I was lucky in that the other folks using the garage had left a few ounces in a bunch of gallon jugs. It is messy but now I have custom mix chain oil. And the tractor weight is there because the bench was lifting up. C7A01556-14FE-4547-BA3D-14D50CCB1FA1_1558142169510.jpg Seal is out and there was a washer. What is not moving is the upper/outer bushing. It is locked in there. Have PB Blaster soaking on it and will try more heat. I’m almost at the point of leaving the bushings on that side and just renewing the left side. But if the inner bushings are jaming in the outers they are probably deformed by now. Any suggestions?
 

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You might try actually reseating the guide metal by tapping on it with my custom pvc pipe tool. 04 to 11 forum, Fork Maintenance.
 

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What condition were the bushings in the other fork leg? I'm wondering if you have damaged the stuck bushing and maybe you're at the stage of "must repair it somehow".

With the fork seal removed and all the oil drained, you should now have much better "slide hammer" type action with no trapped oil to dampen the blow.

Try holding the lower fork leg more securely. Perhaps clamp the axle in a vise (be sure to use aluminum to protect the axle). With the lower leg secured, you can really put some muscle into "slide hammering" the inner tube.

Hope this helps.
 
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