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Discussion Starter #1
Haven't been around for a while, I picked up a new bike about 8 months ago and . . . you know how it goes. Anyway, I've been frequenting the xs11 forum for tips on fixing up my new-old bike. The bike was a POS when I got it but I am shooting to have it on the road by the end of March. You can check out the transformation so far on my thread if you are interested, the bike is an 82 XJ1100.

My first project - XS11.com Forums

Alright, so onto the real reason for this thread. This is my first valve adjustment on my 04 Wee. These are my results (granted I should have done it sooner)

Front cyl:
EX - .17 & .20
IN - .08 & .10

Rear cyl:
Ex - .27 & .25
In - .10 & .10

I have the shims out of the front cyl and they are both 175's on the In and 165's on the Ex. Since the shims come in .05 increments am I right in assuming that I will need the following shims to put the front cylinder in the middle of the spectrum:

EX - 95
- 115
In - 105
- 125

Just want to make sure that I am not missing something here. I won't know about the rear cyl yet since I am not sure what shim sizes are in there. Looks like I won't have to touch the Ex. cam on the rear cyl though!

Thanks for any help you can give.

-Steve
 

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Mid point for the exhaust is 0.25mm, and for the intake 0.15mm. Your present exhaust shims are 1.65mm thick. You want to increase the gap on the exhaust from .17mm to .25mm, 0.08mm change, so you need a shim that is 1.57 mm (1.65 - .08 = 1.57), or 1.55mm shim for a 0.27 gap, although Suzuki's chart calls for a 160 for a .22mm gap. The other exhaust is in spec, but you could increase the gap by .05mm with a 160 shim.

Figure the intakes the same way. Don't worry about trying for the exact mid point. If you are at the minimum spec, .20 exhaust and .10 intake, you might make the change but it isn't (yet) critical--you're still within spec.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Valve clearances only close up with wear. Replacement shim come in 0.05mm steps so you won't get an exact target point but you don't need that. Anything from the middle to the wide part of the range will last a long time. I got tired of sitting at the low end of the spec with almost no movement after 50,000 miles so changed 6 shims to get everything between the middle and wide end of the spec and I don't intend to do any more valve clearance checks.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Cool, thanks guys! It was late and I was doing my math all wrong. Didn't make sense so I thought I would check here first before I wreck something. I am going to change all the ones that are at the tight end of the spec since I have it all apart now anyway.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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38,048 Posts
We've had a lot of posts on valve shim subtraction lately. Most involve misplacing the decimal point. One or, at most, two shims smaller are normally required to bring a too tight clearance to spec. Shims are marked without a decimal point. A 175 shim is 1.75mm thick for example. If a 175 is tight, a 170 or, at most, a 165 will do the trick. Stock shims may be odd sizes. I've seen 172s and 182s for example.
 
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