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Hi guys, one thing I am NOT good at is electrical. I installed the Tusk seat heater kit on my new Seat Concepts seat - see my review thread. The main leads are flat loops that would fit perfectly on the battery. There is an on/off switch with two power levels - so if I did hook it up directly to the battery and REMEMBER to turn it off when the bike is off I'm fine. However the instructions say its better to hook it up to power that is activated by the ignition switch for obvious reasons. Does anyone know if there is a circuit that will work only when the bike is running and how much power it can handle?
 

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There are lots of switched power circuits. One of the most commonly used is the tail marker light (probably because Eastern Beaver sells a ready made harness to tap into it - although I'm not positive he has one for the newest gen DL650 yet). The switched circuits generally don't handle a ton of load and a portion of the load capacity is already dedicated to the bike's original circuit, so the prevailing advice is to use the switched circuit to activate the coil on a relay (low power - basically negligible) so that the relay's main taps (high power) can deliver straight from the battery to your device. Then when you turn off the key, the relay opens and cuts the power to your added gizmo(s).

Eastern Beaver also sells ready made add-on fuse blocks with switched and non switches taps so you can add all your electronic farkles through it. Nice concept, a bit pricey though. If you plan on adding several electrical farkles, you should look into it and decide if it would be worth it for you.
 

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Depending on what you are planning to add, consider Eastern Beaver's PC8 and harness. This will give you 6 fused circuits that switch on with the ignition, and two that are always on. Plenty of power for additional lights, electronics, etc.
 

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, so the prevailing advice is to use the switched circuit to activate the coil on a relay (low power - basically negligible) so that the relay's main taps (high power) can deliver straight from the battery to your device. Then when you turn off the key, the relay opens and cuts the power to your added gizmo(s).
Think of the relay as a electrically activated "on" switch.
As Grimmer says, because this "switch" uses a tiny amount of power you can connect it to a tiny wire, like the tail light. Inside the relay cube is a more hearty set of wires that make the connection from battery to the higher power need such as a heated seat.

For $5 you can get one with the pigtail wires already done for you. Like this one
 

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I'll give a plug for the eastern Beaver fuse panel. Very well done, and if you plan on adding a lot more accessories...like grips, lights, etc the best approach Imho.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Guys I really appreciate the explanations and it makes total sense to me. I'll look into a relay!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Think of the relay as a electrically activated "on" switch.
As Grimmer says, because this "switch" uses a tiny amount of power you can connect it to a tiny wire, like the tail light. Inside the relay cube is a more hearty set of wires that make the connection from battery to the higher power need such as a heated seat.

For $5 you can get one with the pigtail wires already done for you. Like this one
I just ordered the relay from Amazon - looks like the perfect item, thanks! PS: I'll probably be back to make sure I wire it properly!
 

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how many WATTs takes such heated seat?

BTW I don't know why we're wasting so much heat coming from the engine...
Just to add mechanical switch which would redirect heat under the seat and job done using free heat :)
 
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