StromTrooper banner
21 - 33 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Did a ride up to the Hudson Valley from Brooklyn today.

View attachment 308641

Few random thoughts after riding for a few hours:

The bike is cool! It's nice to be able to start a bike and get riding. All my previous bikes needed some kind of startup procedure that involved warming up.

The riding position feels a bit cramped. I think AdventureTech's footpeg relocation kit is in the near future for me.

I like the gear number indicator.

There's a lot of chain noise.

The Puig windscreen works just about okay. There's a lot of buffeting over 70/75 mph. I might get a clip-on visor type thing or just get a Givi Airflow since everyone loves them.

The Oxford grips get really toasty even at 30%.

While in traffic on the George Washington Bridge I noticed that there were 4 bars on the temp gauge. The center is 3 bars, so I had one extra bar. It worried me instantly and thankfully traffic let up right about then and once I picked up some wind the 4th bar disappeared. Cause for concern? I don't have the owners manual so I don't have a definitive source of info just yet.
First of all congrats on your purchase and progress, extremely well documented and provides a great read. Only thing I've not seen addressed are the wheel bearings. The bike has low mileage but given the po's upkeep record I'd at least re grease them. Best of luck on your adventure!
 
  • Like
Reactions: sr248

·
Registered
2007 dl650 v strom
Joined
·
65 Posts
I picked up a 2013 V-Strom 650 with under 8k miles last week. It's more or less stock so it will need some setting up. I am writing this to mostly document that process. It's not really going to be a serious "build" for a RTW or anything like that -- just merely buying parts and bolting them on.

So, to start off, how did I decide to buy a V-Strom? I got my first bike in 2019 and it was a 98 BMW oilhead. I really liked that bike and it was a great first bike. However, I shortly discovered the TAT and needed a bike more appropriate for that. I bought a DRZ and did the TAT in 2021. At the end of the TAT I sold the DRZ and flew back home to the east coast and bought a DR650. The DR was going to be my do-it-all, forever, high-mileage bike. It was really well set-up by the previous owner(s). I added a few things to it and did the MABDR and NEBDR. However, the DR is just about okay on the highway, especially when loaded down with luggage. I also realized that I didn't really like riding motorcycles on donkey trails, especially when there are perfectly well-graded roads available. The DR was great for bouncing up and down trails, and in fact, on some parts of the NEBDR the DR was more in control than I was.

Here's a picture of the DR.

View attachment 308493

Having finished the two BDRs near me, I realized that most of my riding would now be on pavement. There would be the occasional off-pavement riding and maybe some technical stuff, if I wanted to do portions of the NEBDR again, but nothing crazy. The DR didn't seem like the right type of bike for me anymore. I am also planning a cross country trip next year -- hopefully to Alaska -- and most of it is pavement, so I decided that the DR would have to go and another bike would replace it. I asked on advrider for advice and someone mentioned the V-Strom 650 to me. Until this point I was not very familiar with the platform. I was flirting with the idea of getting a 1200GS or a Super Tenere but the more I learned about the V-Strom the more it seemed to fit the bill, except for just one thing.

I absolutely could not get over how bad it looks!

After raging a never-ending internal battle about whether looks are really that important, I decided to see a 2022 model in person at a dealership near me. In person, the bike didn't look that bad. I decided that I could live with it. I also felt that the 2nd generation prior to the beak had a better face. But I wanted spoked wheels, because lewks, so it was either 3rd gen wee or a 2nd gen with a beak.

Meanwhile I posted my DR for sale. I wanted 5K for it, but the best I could get was 4.7K. It went to a very nice and very excited person, so I was happy to sell the bike to him. With under 5K to spare, I looked around on advrider and here on Stromtrooper, but XT models were very rare in that price range. Then out of nowhere I saw a white 2013 on Facebook marketplace about 2 hours drive from me. It was listed for $3,800, had under 8k miles and was pretty much stock except for a cheap top case and heated grips. Until this point I was sure that I would have to do a fly-and-ride because NYC used motorcycle market kinda sucks but this was local and well within my budget. Well, kind of. It needed a handful of aftermarket parts. And as for spoked wheels, I realized that XT models were more expensive and as much as I wanted the spoked wheels because of how good they look, I didn't truly need them. I told myself that I would set aside some money and be on the lookout for anyone selling them.

I went and saw the bike in person after work last week. I immediately noticed that the chain was too tight and there was chain lube everywhere. The seller said the bike was garaged but even so it was clearly neglected. He mentioned that he had a standing offer for $3,100. I offered him $3,200 and we settled on $3,300. It was a great deal for a bike with such low miles, esp one with a reliable reputation like the V-Strom. I didn't sweat the details too much and picked up the bike.

Here's the bike on the day I got it!

View attachment 308494

I put it on the trailer and drove home. And as I kept checking on the bike in the rear view mirror, I started to like the way it looked. It has this really friendly and approachable appearance about it. It reminds me of Toothless from How to Train Your Dragon. I liked this bike!

So after registration and taxes, I have just about a thousand dollars left to accessorize the bike. Among big ticket items, I needed new tires, crash bars, a skid plate and luggage racks. I also needed some other minor things like a 12V socket and battery pigtails. I also suspect the battery is probably going to need replacing, since the seller says it's stock. I would eventually need things like a footpeg lowering kit, a side stand foot etc, but those things weren't essential, so I decided to focus on the tires and the protection stuff first. I estimate that I have just about enough to buy things from the used market and set up the bike properly.

The previous owner did not seem very mechanically inclined or interested, and the oil change was done "recently" and judging by how tight the chain was, I figured that I would have to baseline the maintenance on the bike. I also noticed the brake lever was a bit spongy. I know the wee has a reputation for it, but I expected it to be better than the lever on my DR.

I ordered a set of Shinko 705s from Revzilla. They are inexpensive and most people like them. For $270 a set, that's a deal! They're already here and I'll mount and balance them later this week.

On the marketplace I saw someone selling crash bars. I am in the process of acquiring them. $185 shipped. Pretty good deal.

I tried to figure out how to get a socket and plug it into the accessory port. It seemed like I would need to get an accessory cable from Eastern Beaver. And buying just one thing from EB is pretty expensive because of shipping costs. I looked into how I could get the right type of electrical adapter that would mate with the accessory port. Someone wrote about a horn lead. And while I was trying to figure that out, I saw a listing for an EB PC8 for $70. I figured I'd get that and connect everything to that and not mess around with figuring out accessory ports. The PO wired heated grips directly to the battery, so with the PC8 I could correct that. Another good deal and the member selling it is amazing. We're doing things the honesty way and he's already shipped the part while the check from me is on it's way!

With some parts coming, it was time to get a closer look at the bike. I have been traveling since I got the bike and just tonight I had some time to take a closer look. I started with cleaning the chain and wow, there was an incredible amount of grime on the chain and surrounding areas. For a brief moment I was wondering if I had bought a wee that was leaking oil everywhere. But I am pretty sure it's all just road grim. I think.

View attachment 308495

You can see how bad it is. I saw the bike around dusk when I was buying it, and I wanted the bike, so I didn't really do my diligence. Rookie mistake.

Anyways, I got to work with some de-greaser. I forgot to take pictures of the chain after I was done, but it looks a LOT better. I'll try to snag some pictures tomorrow. I couldn't get to the grime on the spring in the rear shock, but I got the rest and also adjusted the chain to about roughly 2 inches. I don't have the owners manual, and a quick google resulted in that number. I am going to put new tires on it so I can figure the right length later on. I just needed the chain to not be as tight and snug as it was previously. And also not as grimey!

Here's some grime that I picked up from near the countershaft sprocjet.

View attachment 308498

Unbelievable! It was like putty.

After the chain, I decided to inspect the cheapo top box. And I was so pissed after I discovered that the PO had drilled holes right on to the rear rack to fit the top box plate! How can you make such an irreversible decision to drill into the bike's rear rack? Is this what most people who have a top box end up doing? I threw the top box and the plate out and put a 'free' sticker on it.

View attachment 308496

Oh the atrocity!!

Well, it wasn't over yet for me tonight. The bike came with a Puig windscreen. And it's a bit big, so I figured I'd adjust it to a lower position. What an ordeal that turned out to be! I took the windscreen off -- that was easy, but when I tried to get the plastic bushing insert like things with a brass fitting inside them, it proved to be very frustrating. I am talking about the part that attaches to the bike and has a threaded hole. The rubber on these fittings were brittle so I threaded the nut in partially and tried to take them out. Three of them came out easily, and one of them was a stubborn mofo. After WD-40, vice grips and a lot of cursing, it finally came out.

View attachment 308497

The two on the left came out easy, and you can see how fucked up the parts on the right are. The insert had bulged and it was very hard to get it out. I think it was over-tightened previously. You can see the marks my vice grip left on the nut that I threaded in partially for better grip. I had put a rag around it, but that didn't help.

Pretty terrible design, IMO. I am going to email Puig and see if they'll sell me these parts. I am completely unfamiliar with this brand so I have no idea if they'll co-operate. Right now the bike is without a windscreen. I was hoping to ride it this weekend but now I'll have to ride it without a windscreen. Quite annoyed by this. Should have just left the damn thing alone.

That's about it for now. I will post more as I do more stuff to the bike. Like I said earlier -- it will all be pretty routine. I am documenting and sharing the money numbers so it helps someone else evaluate their decisions about coming to the wee side.

If you have a frame mounted skid plate that's sitting around, let me know!
I picked up a 2013 V-Strom 650 with under 8k miles last week. It's more or less stock so it will need some setting up. I am writing this to mostly document that process. It's not really going to be a serious "build" for a RTW or anything like that -- just merely buying parts and bolting them on.

So, to start off, how did I decide to buy a V-Strom? I got my first bike in 2019 and it was a 98 BMW oilhead. I really liked that bike and it was a great first bike. However, I shortly discovered the TAT and needed a bike more appropriate for that. I bought a DRZ and did the TAT in 2021. At the end of the TAT I sold the DRZ and flew back home to the east coast and bought a DR650. The DR was going to be my do-it-all, forever, high-mileage bike. It was really well set-up by the previous owner(s). I added a few things to it and did the MABDR and NEBDR. However, the DR is just about okay on the highway, especially when loaded down with luggage. I also realized that I didn't really like riding motorcycles on donkey trails, especially when there are perfectly well-graded roads available. The DR was great for bouncing up and down trails, and in fact, on some parts of the NEBDR the DR was more in control than I was.

Here's a picture of the DR.

View attachment 308493

Having finished the two BDRs near me, I realized that most of my riding would now be on pavement. There would be the occasional off-pavement riding and maybe some technical stuff, if I wanted to do portions of the NEBDR again, but nothing crazy. The DR didn't seem like the right type of bike for me anymore. I am also planning a cross country trip next year -- hopefully to Alaska -- and most of it is pavement, so I decided that the DR would have to go and another bike would replace it. I asked on advrider for advice and someone mentioned the V-Strom 650 to me. Until this point I was not very familiar with the platform. I was flirting with the idea of getting a 1200GS or a Super Tenere but the more I learned about the V-Strom the more it seemed to fit the bill, except for just one thing.

I absolutely could not get over how bad it looks!

After raging a never-ending internal battle about whether looks are really that important, I decided to see a 2022 model in person at a dealership near me. In person, the bike didn't look that bad. I decided that I could live with it. I also felt that the 2nd generation prior to the beak had a better face. But I wanted spoked wheels, because lewks, so it was either 3rd gen wee or a 2nd gen with a beak.

Meanwhile I posted my DR for sale. I wanted 5K for it, but the best I could get was 4.7K. It went to a very nice and very excited person, so I was happy to sell the bike to him. With under 5K to spare, I looked around on advrider and here on Stromtrooper, but XT models were very rare in that price range. Then out of nowhere I saw a white 2013 on Facebook marketplace about 2 hours drive from me. It was listed for $3,800, had under 8k miles and was pretty much stock except for a cheap top case and heated grips. Until this point I was sure that I would have to do a fly-and-ride because NYC used motorcycle market kinda sucks but this was local and well within my budget. Well, kind of. It needed a handful of aftermarket parts. And as for spoked wheels, I realized that XT models were more expensive and as much as I wanted the spoked wheels because of how good they look, I didn't truly need them. I told myself that I would set aside some money and be on the lookout for anyone selling them.

I went and saw the bike in person after work last week. I immediately noticed that the chain was too tight and there was chain lube everywhere. The seller said the bike was garaged but even so it was clearly neglected. He mentioned that he had a standing offer for $3,100. I offered him $3,200 and we settled on $3,300. It was a great deal for a bike with such low miles, esp one with a reliable reputation like the V-Strom. I didn't sweat the details too much and picked up the bike.

Here's the bike on the day I got it!

View attachment 308494

I put it on the trailer and drove home. And as I kept checking on the bike in the rear view mirror, I started to like the way it looked. It has this really friendly and approachable appearance about it. It reminds me of Toothless from How to Train Your Dragon. I liked this bike!

So after registration and taxes, I have just about a thousand dollars left to accessorize the bike. Among big ticket items, I needed new tires, crash bars, a skid plate and luggage racks. I also needed some other minor things like a 12V socket and battery pigtails. I also suspect the battery is probably going to need replacing, since the seller says it's stock. I would eventually need things like a footpeg lowering kit, a side stand foot etc, but those things weren't essential, so I decided to focus on the tires and the protection stuff first. I estimate that I have just about enough to buy things from the used market and set up the bike properly.

The previous owner did not seem very mechanically inclined or interested, and the oil change was done "recently" and judging by how tight the chain was, I figured that I would have to baseline the maintenance on the bike. I also noticed the brake lever was a bit spongy. I know the wee has a reputation for it, but I expected it to be better than the lever on my DR.

I ordered a set of Shinko 705s from Revzilla. They are inexpensive and most people like them. For $270 a set, that's a deal! They're already here and I'll mount and balance them later this week.

On the marketplace I saw someone selling crash bars. I am in the process of acquiring them. $185 shipped. Pretty good deal.

I tried to figure out how to get a socket and plug it into the accessory port. It seemed like I would need to get an accessory cable from Eastern Beaver. And buying just one thing from EB is pretty expensive because of shipping costs. I looked into how I could get the right type of electrical adapter that would mate with the accessory port. Someone wrote about a horn lead. And while I was trying to figure that out, I saw a listing for an EB PC8 for $70. I figured I'd get that and connect everything to that and not mess around with figuring out accessory ports. The PO wired heated grips directly to the battery, so with the PC8 I could correct that. Another good deal and the member selling it is amazing. We're doing things the honesty way and he's already shipped the part while the check from me is on it's way!

With some parts coming, it was time to get a closer look at the bike. I have been traveling since I got the bike and just tonight I had some time to take a closer look. I started with cleaning the chain and wow, there was an incredible amount of grime on the chain and surrounding areas. For a brief moment I was wondering if I had bought a wee that was leaking oil everywhere. But I am pretty sure it's all just road grim. I think.

View attachment 308495

You can see how bad it is. I saw the bike around dusk when I was buying it, and I wanted the bike, so I didn't really do my diligence. Rookie mistake.

Anyways, I got to work with some de-greaser. I forgot to take pictures of the chain after I was done, but it looks a LOT better. I'll try to snag some pictures tomorrow. I couldn't get to the grime on the spring in the rear shock, but I got the rest and also adjusted the chain to about roughly 2 inches. I don't have the owners manual, and a quick google resulted in that number. I am going to put new tires on it so I can figure the right length later on. I just needed the chain to not be as tight and snug as it was previously. And also not as grimey!

Here's some grime that I picked up from near the countershaft sprocjet.

View attachment 308498

Unbelievable! It was like putty.

After the chain, I decided to inspect the cheapo top box. And I was so pissed after I discovered that the PO had drilled holes right on to the rear rack to fit the top box plate! How can you make such an irreversible decision to drill into the bike's rear rack? Is this what most people who have a top box end up doing? I threw the top box and the plate out and put a 'free' sticker on it.

View attachment 308496

Oh the atrocity!!

Well, it wasn't over yet for me tonight. The bike came with a Puig windscreen. And it's a bit big, so I figured I'd adjust it to a lower position. What an ordeal that turned out to be! I took the windscreen off -- that was easy, but when I tried to get the plastic bushing insert like things with a brass fitting inside them, it proved to be very frustrating. I am talking about the part that attaches to the bike and has a threaded hole. The rubber on these fittings were brittle so I threaded the nut in partially and tried to take them out. Three of them came out easily, and one of them was a stubborn mofo. After WD-40, vice grips and a lot of cursing, it finally came out.

View attachment 308497

The two on the left came out easy, and you can see how fucked up the parts on the right are. The insert had bulged and it was very hard to get it out. I think it was over-tightened previously. You can see the marks my vice grip left on the nut that I threaded in partially for better grip. I had put a rag around it, but that didn't help.

Pretty terrible design, IMO. I am going to email Puig and see if they'll sell me these parts. I am completely unfamiliar with this brand so I have no idea if they'll co-operate. Right now the bike is without a windscreen. I was hoping to ride it this weekend but now I'll have to ride it without a windscreen. Quite annoyed by this. Should have just left the damn thing alone.

That's about it for now. I will post more as I do more stuff to the bike. Like I said earlier -- it will all be pretty routine. I am documenting and sharing the money numbers so it helps someone else evaluate their decisions about coming to the wee side.

If you have a frame mounted skid plate that's sitting around, let me know!
Today was a rough one! My to-list for today was a long one and included mounting and balancing the new tires, changing the oil, cleaning the air filter, installing the PC8 fusebox and the new accessory charger. I was also going to try and see if the windshield hardware I ordered on Amazon would fit or not. I was hoping to be done in time for maybe a short afternoon ride.

The autozone near me ran out of Mobil 1 so I picked up Rotella T6. I went to the shop and decided to the easy one first -- check the mounting hardware for fit with the windshield. Unfortunately the hardware did not fit. The plastic bushing with the threaded inserts were just a touch too small. I used some electrical tape to increase the diameter, but it just wasn't secure enough for the windscreen. I still put the windscreen on, but I'm not fully comfortable with how it's mounted. This will need more work.

I then started taking the panels off to take the tank out. I figured I'd do the air box first and that would also allow me to run wires under the tank. That's when I discovered that one of the plastic trim bolt head was rounded. I tried to get the bolt out but the more I tried, the more rounded it got. Eventually it was pretty much rounded. After about 2 hours, I posted asking here asking for advice. I took a look at some of the other bolts in the area, and I noticed that a few were in bad shape. I made a mental note to order replacements. While I took a break from the bolt, I got to doing the other stuff on the list.

I tried to figure out a way to place the PC8 in a way that was neat and tidy but also did not require any cutting plastic pieces. Maybe I was still frustrated from the rounded bolt, I just could not figure out a place for it. Eventually I decided to just tuck it in front of the battery. It's messy for sure. I also wasn't sure how I'd attach my thick gauge battery tender to PC8. The accessory "ports" seem pretty small.

View attachment 308622

After the PC8 was squared away, I tried to get back to the bolt and tried a few things other members here suggested, like a torx bit. Nothing seemed to work. I decided to put some epoxy on a throwaway wrench and the bolt, hoping to undo it after the epoxy settled. But I don't think I got the right kind of epoxy so that was a bust.

With frustration mounting about the bolt, I decided to tackle the tire change next. I started with the rear and it worked out pretty well. Putting the tire wheel back on took much, much longer than I had expected. Hopefully the next ones will be quicker. The front tire required some more planning and thought. I have a centerstand but it doesn't raise the front wheel. I was quite surprised to learn this as I had assumed that the center stand would raise both wheels. Thankfully the shop had two jacks so I used them on the two forks.

View attachment 308621

I scratched up the wheels quite a bit during the tire change. To be honest I don't care that much. This wee will be ridden so these scratches don't bother me. And I can always paint over them.

After the tire change, I started putting the bike together. I took another shot at the bolt with a dremel to cut a slot into it. It didn't work. I took a big flat head to it and ended up scratching some of the trim pieces. This one hurt. Putting the white trim back was also very aggravating. I'm not really sure why the design with the velcro is the way it is.

I am going to leave the bolt as is for now. I will be traveling for a month. This will be a project for when I get back. Meanwhile I need to figure out a more permanent windshield situation and also how to fit a thicker gauge in PC8.

I ended up spending over 12 hours at the shop today. It was just one of those days where things took a little bit longer to get done. Hoping to get a nice ride in tomorrow or the day after!
I picked up a 2013 V-Strom 650 with under 8k miles last week. It's more or less stock so it will need some setting up. I am writing this to mostly document that process. It's not really going to be a serious "build" for a RTW or anything like that -- just merely buying parts and bolting them on.

So, to start off, how did I decide to buy a V-Strom? I got my first bike in 2019 and it was a 98 BMW oilhead. I really liked that bike and it was a great first bike. However, I shortly discovered the TAT and needed a bike more appropriate for that. I bought a DRZ and did the TAT in 2021. At the end of the TAT I sold the DRZ and flew back home to the east coast and bought a DR650. The DR was going to be my do-it-all, forever, high-mileage bike. It was really well set-up by the previous owner(s). I added a few things to it and did the MABDR and NEBDR. However, the DR is just about okay on the highway, especially when loaded down with luggage. I also realized that I didn't really like riding motorcycles on donkey trails, especially when there are perfectly well-graded roads available. The DR was great for bouncing up and down trails, and in fact, on some parts of the NEBDR the DR was more in control than I was.

Here's a picture of the DR.

View attachment 308493

Having finished the two BDRs near me, I realized that most of my riding would now be on pavement. There would be the occasional off-pavement riding and maybe some technical stuff, if I wanted to do portions of the NEBDR again, but nothing crazy. The DR didn't seem like the right type of bike for me anymore. I am also planning a cross country trip next year -- hopefully to Alaska -- and most of it is pavement, so I decided that the DR would have to go and another bike would replace it. I asked on advrider for advice and someone mentioned the V-Strom 650 to me. Until this point I was not very familiar with the platform. I was flirting with the idea of getting a 1200GS or a Super Tenere but the more I learned about the V-Strom the more it seemed to fit the bill, except for just one thing.

I absolutely could not get over how bad it looks!

After raging a never-ending internal battle about whether looks are really that important, I decided to see a 2022 model in person at a dealership near me. In person, the bike didn't look that bad. I decided that I could live with it. I also felt that the 2nd generation prior to the beak had a better face. But I wanted spoked wheels, because lewks, so it was either 3rd gen wee or a 2nd gen with a beak.

Meanwhile I posted my DR for sale. I wanted 5K for it, but the best I could get was 4.7K. It went to a very nice and very excited person, so I was happy to sell the bike to him. With under 5K to spare, I looked around on advrider and here on Stromtrooper, but XT models were very rare in that price range. Then out of nowhere I saw a white 2013 on Facebook marketplace about 2 hours drive from me. It was listed for $3,800, had under 8k miles and was pretty much stock except for a cheap top case and heated grips. Until this point I was sure that I would have to do a fly-and-ride because NYC used motorcycle market kinda sucks but this was local and well within my budget. Well, kind of. It needed a handful of aftermarket parts. And as for spoked wheels, I realized that XT models were more expensive and as much as I wanted the spoked wheels because of how good they look, I didn't truly need them. I told myself that I would set aside some money and be on the lookout for anyone selling them.

I went and saw the bike in person after work last week. I immediately noticed that the chain was too tight and there was chain lube everywhere. The seller said the bike was garaged but even so it was clearly neglected. He mentioned that he had a standing offer for $3,100. I offered him $3,200 and we settled on $3,300. It was a great deal for a bike with such low miles, esp one with a reliable reputation like the V-Strom. I didn't sweat the details too much and picked up the bike.

Here's the bike on the day I got it!

View attachment 308494

I put it on the trailer and drove home. And as I kept checking on the bike in the rear view mirror, I started to like the way it looked. It has this really friendly and approachable appearance about it. It reminds me of Toothless from How to Train Your Dragon. I liked this bike!

So after registration and taxes, I have just about a thousand dollars left to accessorize the bike. Among big ticket items, I needed new tires, crash bars, a skid plate and luggage racks. I also needed some other minor things like a 12V socket and battery pigtails. I also suspect the battery is probably going to need replacing, since the seller says it's stock. I would eventually need things like a footpeg lowering kit, a side stand foot etc, but those things weren't essential, so I decided to focus on the tires and the protection stuff first. I estimate that I have just about enough to buy things from the used market and set up the bike properly.

The previous owner did not seem very mechanically inclined or interested, and the oil change was done "recently" and judging by how tight the chain was, I figured that I would have to baseline the maintenance on the bike. I also noticed the brake lever was a bit spongy. I know the wee has a reputation for it, but I expected it to be better than the lever on my DR.

I ordered a set of Shinko 705s from Revzilla. They are inexpensive and most people like them. For $270 a set, that's a deal! They're already here and I'll mount and balance them later this week.

On the marketplace I saw someone selling crash bars. I am in the process of acquiring them. $185 shipped. Pretty good deal.

I tried to figure out how to get a socket and plug it into the accessory port. It seemed like I would need to get an accessory cable from Eastern Beaver. And buying just one thing from EB is pretty expensive because of shipping costs. I looked into how I could get the right type of electrical adapter that would mate with the accessory port. Someone wrote about a horn lead. And while I was trying to figure that out, I saw a listing for an EB PC8 for $70. I figured I'd get that and connect everything to that and not mess around with figuring out accessory ports. The PO wired heated grips directly to the battery, so with the PC8 I could correct that. Another good deal and the member selling it is amazing. We're doing things the honesty way and he's already shipped the part while the check from me is on it's way!

With some parts coming, it was time to get a closer look at the bike. I have been traveling since I got the bike and just tonight I had some time to take a closer look. I started with cleaning the chain and wow, there was an incredible amount of grime on the chain and surrounding areas. For a brief moment I was wondering if I had bought a wee that was leaking oil everywhere. But I am pretty sure it's all just road grim. I think.

View attachment 308495

You can see how bad it is. I saw the bike around dusk when I was buying it, and I wanted the bike, so I didn't really do my diligence. Rookie mistake.

Anyways, I got to work with some de-greaser. I forgot to take pictures of the chain after I was done, but it looks a LOT better. I'll try to snag some pictures tomorrow. I couldn't get to the grime on the spring in the rear shock, but I got the rest and also adjusted the chain to about roughly 2 inches. I don't have the owners manual, and a quick google resulted in that number. I am going to put new tires on it so I can figure the right length later on. I just needed the chain to not be as tight and snug as it was previously. And also not as grimey!

Here's some grime that I picked up from near the countershaft sprocjet.

View attachment 308498

Unbelievable! It was like putty.

After the chain, I decided to inspect the cheapo top box. And I was so pissed after I discovered that the PO had drilled holes right on to the rear rack to fit the top box plate! How can you make such an irreversible decision to drill into the bike's rear rack? Is this what most people who have a top box end up doing? I threw the top box and the plate out and put a 'free' sticker on it.

View attachment 308496

Oh the atrocity!!

Well, it wasn't over yet for me tonight. The bike came with a Puig windscreen. And it's a bit big, so I figured I'd adjust it to a lower position. What an ordeal that turned out to be! I took the windscreen off -- that was easy, but when I tried to get the plastic bushing insert like things with a brass fitting inside them, it proved to be very frustrating. I am talking about the part that attaches to the bike and has a threaded hole. The rubber on these fittings were brittle so I threaded the nut in partially and tried to take them out. Three of them came out easily, and one of them was a stubborn mofo. After WD-40, vice grips and a lot of cursing, it finally came out.

View attachment 308497

The two on the left came out easy, and you can see how fucked up the parts on the right are. The insert had bulged and it was very hard to get it out. I think it was over-tightened previously. You can see the marks my vice grip left on the nut that I threaded in partially for better grip. I had put a rag around it, but that didn't help.

Pretty terrible design, IMO. I am going to email Puig and see if they'll sell me these parts. I am completely unfamiliar with this brand so I have no idea if they'll co-operate. Right now the bike is without a windscreen. I was hoping to ride it this weekend but now I'll have to ride it without a windscreen. Quite annoyed by this. Should have just left the damn thing alone.

That's about it for now. I will post more as I do more stuff to the bike. Like I said earlier -- it will all be pretty routine. I am documenting and sharing the money numbers so it helps someone else evaluate their decisions about coming to the wee side.

If you have a frame mounted skid plate that's sitting around, let me know!
I picked up a 2013 V-Strom 650 with under 8k miles last week. It's more or less stock so it will need some setting up. I am writing this to mostly document that process. It's not really going to be a serious "build" for a RTW or anything like that -- just merely buying parts and bolting them on.

So, to start off, how did I decide to buy a V-Strom? I got my first bike in 2019 and it was a 98 BMW oilhead. I really liked that bike and it was a great first bike. However, I shortly discovered the TAT and needed a bike more appropriate for that. I bought a DRZ and did the TAT in 2021. At the end of the TAT I sold the DRZ and flew back home to the east coast and bought a DR650. The DR was going to be my do-it-all, forever, high-mileage bike. It was really well set-up by the previous owner(s). I added a few things to it and did the MABDR and NEBDR. However, the DR is just about okay on the highway, especially when loaded down with luggage. I also realized that I didn't really like riding motorcycles on donkey trails, especially when there are perfectly well-graded roads available. The DR was great for bouncing up and down trails, and in fact, on some parts of the NEBDR the DR was more in control than I was.

Here's a picture of the DR.

View attachment 308493

Having finished the two BDRs near me, I realized that most of my riding would now be on pavement. There would be the occasional off-pavement riding and maybe some technical stuff, if I wanted to do portions of the NEBDR again, but nothing crazy. The DR didn't seem like the right type of bike for me anymore. I am also planning a cross country trip next year -- hopefully to Alaska -- and most of it is pavement, so I decided that the DR would have to go and another bike would replace it. I asked on advrider for advice and someone mentioned the V-Strom 650 to me. Until this point I was not very familiar with the platform. I was flirting with the idea of getting a 1200GS or a Super Tenere but the more I learned about the V-Strom the more it seemed to fit the bill, except for just one thing.

I absolutely could not get over how bad it looks!

After raging a never-ending internal battle about whether looks are really that important, I decided to see a 2022 model in person at a dealership near me. In person, the bike didn't look that bad. I decided that I could live with it. I also felt that the 2nd generation prior to the beak had a better face. But I wanted spoked wheels, because lewks, so it was either 3rd gen wee or a 2nd gen with a beak.

Meanwhile I posted my DR for sale. I wanted 5K for it, but the best I could get was 4.7K. It went to a very nice and very excited person, so I was happy to sell the bike to him. With under 5K to spare, I looked around on advrider and here on Stromtrooper, but XT models were very rare in that price range. Then out of nowhere I saw a white 2013 on Facebook marketplace about 2 hours drive from me. It was listed for $3,800, had under 8k miles and was pretty much stock except for a cheap top case and heated grips. Until this point I was sure that I would have to do a fly-and-ride because NYC used motorcycle market kinda sucks but this was local and well within my budget. Well, kind of. It needed a handful of aftermarket parts. And as for spoked wheels, I realized that XT models were more expensive and as much as I wanted the spoked wheels because of how good they look, I didn't truly need them. I told myself that I would set aside some money and be on the lookout for anyone selling them.

I went and saw the bike in person after work last week. I immediately noticed that the chain was too tight and there was chain lube everywhere. The seller said the bike was garaged but even so it was clearly neglected. He mentioned that he had a standing offer for $3,100. I offered him $3,200 and we settled on $3,300. It was a great deal for a bike with such low miles, esp one with a reliable reputation like the V-Strom. I didn't sweat the details too much and picked up the bike.

Here's the bike on the day I got it!

View attachment 308494

I put it on the trailer and drove home. And as I kept checking on the bike in the rear view mirror, I started to like the way it looked. It has this really friendly and approachable appearance about it. It reminds me of Toothless from How to Train Your Dragon. I liked this bike!

So after registration and taxes, I have just about a thousand dollars left to accessorize the bike. Among big ticket items, I needed new tires, crash bars, a skid plate and luggage racks. I also needed some other minor things like a 12V socket and battery pigtails. I also suspect the battery is probably going to need replacing, since the seller says it's stock. I would eventually need things like a footpeg lowering kit, a side stand foot etc, but those things weren't essential, so I decided to focus on the tires and the protection stuff first. I estimate that I have just about enough to buy things from the used market and set up the bike properly.

The previous owner did not seem very mechanically inclined or interested, and the oil change was done "recently" and judging by how tight the chain was, I figured that I would have to baseline the maintenance on the bike. I also noticed the brake lever was a bit spongy. I know the wee has a reputation for it, but I expected it to be better than the lever on my DR.

I ordered a set of Shinko 705s from Revzilla. They are inexpensive and most people like them. For $270 a set, that's a deal! They're already here and I'll mount and balance them later this week.

On the marketplace I saw someone selling crash bars. I am in the process of acquiring them. $185 shipped. Pretty good deal.

I tried to figure out how to get a socket and plug it into the accessory port. It seemed like I would need to get an accessory cable from Eastern Beaver. And buying just one thing from EB is pretty expensive because of shipping costs. I looked into how I could get the right type of electrical adapter that would mate with the accessory port. Someone wrote about a horn lead. And while I was trying to figure that out, I saw a listing for an EB PC8 for $70. I figured I'd get that and connect everything to that and not mess around with figuring out accessory ports. The PO wired heated grips directly to the battery, so with the PC8 I could correct that. Another good deal and the member selling it is amazing. We're doing things the honesty way and he's already shipped the part while the check from me is on it's way!

With some parts coming, it was time to get a closer look at the bike. I have been traveling since I got the bike and just tonight I had some time to take a closer look. I started with cleaning the chain and wow, there was an incredible amount of grime on the chain and surrounding areas. For a brief moment I was wondering if I had bought a wee that was leaking oil everywhere. But I am pretty sure it's all just road grim. I think.

View attachment 308495

You can see how bad it is. I saw the bike around dusk when I was buying it, and I wanted the bike, so I didn't really do my diligence. Rookie mistake.

Anyways, I got to work with some de-greaser. I forgot to take pictures of the chain after I was done, but it looks a LOT better. I'll try to snag some pictures tomorrow. I couldn't get to the grime on the spring in the rear shock, but I got the rest and also adjusted the chain to about roughly 2 inches. I don't have the owners manual, and a quick google resulted in that number. I am going to put new tires on it so I can figure the right length later on. I just needed the chain to not be as tight and snug as it was previously. And also not as grimey!

Here's some grime that I picked up from near the countershaft sprocjet.

View attachment 308498

Unbelievable! It was like putty.

After the chain, I decided to inspect the cheapo top box. And I was so pissed after I discovered that the PO had drilled holes right on to the rear rack to fit the top box plate! How can you make such an irreversible decision to drill into the bike's rear rack? Is this what most people who have a top box end up doing? I threw the top box and the plate out and put a 'free' sticker on it.

View attachment 308496

Oh the atrocity!!

Well, it wasn't over yet for me tonight. The bike came with a Puig windscreen. And it's a bit big, so I figured I'd adjust it to a lower position. What an ordeal that turned out to be! I took the windscreen off -- that was easy, but when I tried to get the plastic bushing insert like things with a brass fitting inside them, it proved to be very frustrating. I am talking about the part that attaches to the bike and has a threaded hole. The rubber on these fittings were brittle so I threaded the nut in partially and tried to take them out. Three of them came out easily, and one of them was a stubborn mofo. After WD-40, vice grips and a lot of cursing, it finally came out.

View attachment 308497

The two on the left came out easy, and you can see how fucked up the parts on the right are. The insert had bulged and it was very hard to get it out. I think it was over-tightened previously. You can see the marks my vice grip left on the nut that I threaded in partially for better grip. I had put a rag around it, but that didn't help.

Pretty terrible design, IMO. I am going to email Puig and see if they'll sell me these parts. I am completely unfamiliar with this brand so I have no idea if they'll co-operate. Right now the bike is without a windscreen. I was hoping to ride it this weekend but now I'll have to ride it without a windscreen. Quite annoyed by this. Should have just left the damn thing alone.

That's about it for now. I will post more as I do more stuff to the bike. Like I said earlier -- it will all be pretty routine. I am documenting and sharing the money numbers so it helps someone else evaluate their decisions about coming to the wee side.

If you have a frame mounted skid plate that's sitting around, let me know!
G'day from the land down under. Bloody hell mate, that was some yarn! Never bothered to read it all coz that would be a half an hour I will never get back. Skid/bash plate? Where did you say you ride again? Never had one myself. I live on dirt. Ride up granite mountains and haven't actually needed one yet. So I doubt you will mate. What's with all these modifications anyway. I would rather be out riding than messing about with something that doesn't need fixing, and then writing a bloody novel about it! Life is short mate. Go for a ride. If you want a different type bike than the one you bought, then buy that type of bike. Or have several like me. The v strom is my "go to" machine. But I have a crf for real bush bashing. A klr for other days. And a few others just for fun. All were bought slighly used for half new price. Works for me.

I picked up a 2013 V-Strom 650 with under 8k miles last week. It's more or less stock so it will need some setting up. I am writing this to mostly document that process. It's not really going to be a serious "build" for a RTW or anything like that -- just merely buying parts and bolting them on.

So, to start off, how did I decide to buy a V-Strom? I got my first bike in 2019 and it was a 98 BMW oilhead. I really liked that bike and it was a great first bike. However, I shortly discovered the TAT and needed a bike more appropriate for that. I bought a DRZ and did the TAT in 2021. At the end of the TAT I sold the DRZ and flew back home to the east coast and bought a DR650. The DR was going to be my do-it-all, forever, high-mileage bike. It was really well set-up by the previous owner(s). I added a few things to it and did the MABDR and NEBDR. However, the DR is just about okay on the highway, especially when loaded down with luggage. I also realized that I didn't really like riding motorcycles on donkey trails, especially when there are perfectly well-graded roads available. The DR was great for bouncing up and down trails, and in fact, on some parts of the NEBDR the DR was more in control than I was.

Here's a picture of the DR.

View attachment 308493

Having finished the two BDRs near me, I realized that most of my riding would now be on pavement. There would be the occasional off-pavement riding and maybe some technical stuff, if I wanted to do portions of the NEBDR again, but nothing crazy. The DR didn't seem like the right type of bike for me anymore. I am also planning a cross country trip next year -- hopefully to Alaska -- and most of it is pavement, so I decided that the DR would have to go and another bike would replace it. I asked on advrider for advice and someone mentioned the V-Strom 650 to me. Until this point I was not very familiar with the platform. I was flirting with the idea of getting a 1200GS or a Super Tenere but the more I learned about the V-Strom the more it seemed to fit the bill, except for just one thing.

I absolutely could not get over how bad it looks!

After raging a never-ending internal battle about whether looks are really that important, I decided to see a 2022 model in person at a dealership near me. In person, the bike didn't look that bad. I decided that I could live with it. I also felt that the 2nd generation prior to the beak had a better face. But I wanted spoked wheels, because lewks, so it was either 3rd gen wee or a 2nd gen with a beak.

Meanwhile I posted my DR for sale. I wanted 5K for it, but the best I could get was 4.7K. It went to a very nice and very excited person, so I was happy to sell the bike to him. With under 5K to spare, I looked around on advrider and here on Stromtrooper, but XT models were very rare in that price range. Then out of nowhere I saw a white 2013 on Facebook marketplace about 2 hours drive from me. It was listed for $3,800, had under 8k miles and was pretty much stock except for a cheap top case and heated grips. Until this point I was sure that I would have to do a fly-and-ride because NYC used motorcycle market kinda sucks but this was local and well within my budget. Well, kind of. It needed a handful of aftermarket parts. And as for spoked wheels, I realized that XT models were more expensive and as much as I wanted the spoked wheels because of how good they look, I didn't truly need them. I told myself that I would set aside some money and be on the lookout for anyone selling them.

I went and saw the bike in person after work last week. I immediately noticed that the chain was too tight and there was chain lube everywhere. The seller said the bike was garaged but even so it was clearly neglected. He mentioned that he had a standing offer for $3,100. I offered him $3,200 and we settled on $3,300. It was a great deal for a bike with such low miles, esp one with a reliable reputation like the V-Strom. I didn't sweat the details too much and picked up the bike.

Here's the bike on the day I got it!

View attachment 308494

I put it on the trailer and drove home. And as I kept checking on the bike in the rear view mirror, I started to like the way it looked. It has this really friendly and approachable appearance about it. It reminds me of Toothless from How to Train Your Dragon. I liked this bike!

So after registration and taxes, I have just about a thousand dollars left to accessorize the bike. Among big ticket items, I needed new tires, crash bars, a skid plate and luggage racks. I also needed some other minor things like a 12V socket and battery pigtails. I also suspect the battery is probably going to need replacing, since the seller says it's stock. I would eventually need things like a footpeg lowering kit, a side stand foot etc, but those things weren't essential, so I decided to focus on the tires and the protection stuff first. I estimate that I have just about enough to buy things from the used market and set up the bike properly.

The previous owner did not seem very mechanically inclined or interested, and the oil change was done "recently" and judging by how tight the chain was, I figured that I would have to baseline the maintenance on the bike. I also noticed the brake lever was a bit spongy. I know the wee has a reputation for it, but I expected it to be better than the lever on my DR.

I ordered a set of Shinko 705s from Revzilla. They are inexpensive and most people like them. For $270 a set, that's a deal! They're already here and I'll mount and balance them later this week.

On the marketplace I saw someone selling crash bars. I am in the process of acquiring them. $185 shipped. Pretty good deal.

I tried to figure out how to get a socket and plug it into the accessory port. It seemed like I would need to get an accessory cable from Eastern Beaver. And buying just one thing from EB is pretty expensive because of shipping costs. I looked into how I could get the right type of electrical adapter that would mate with the accessory port. Someone wrote about a horn lead. And while I was trying to figure that out, I saw a listing for an EB PC8 for $70. I figured I'd get that and connect everything to that and not mess around with figuring out accessory ports. The PO wired heated grips directly to the battery, so with the PC8 I could correct that. Another good deal and the member selling it is amazing. We're doing things the honesty way and he's already shipped the part while the check from me is on it's way!

With some parts coming, it was time to get a closer look at the bike. I have been traveling since I got the bike and just tonight I had some time to take a closer look. I started with cleaning the chain and wow, there was an incredible amount of grime on the chain and surrounding areas. For a brief moment I was wondering if I had bought a wee that was leaking oil everywhere. But I am pretty sure it's all just road grim. I think.

View attachment 308495

You can see how bad it is. I saw the bike around dusk when I was buying it, and I wanted the bike, so I didn't really do my diligence. Rookie mistake.

Anyways, I got to work with some de-greaser. I forgot to take pictures of the chain after I was done, but it looks a LOT better. I'll try to snag some pictures tomorrow. I couldn't get to the grime on the spring in the rear shock, but I got the rest and also adjusted the chain to about roughly 2 inches. I don't have the owners manual, and a quick google resulted in that number. I am going to put new tires on it so I can figure the right length later on. I just needed the chain to not be as tight and snug as it was previously. And also not as grimey!

Here's some grime that I picked up from near the countershaft sprocjet.

View attachment 308498

Unbelievable! It was like putty.

After the chain, I decided to inspect the cheapo top box. And I was so pissed after I discovered that the PO had drilled holes right on to the rear rack to fit the top box plate! How can you make such an irreversible decision to drill into the bike's rear rack? Is this what most people who have a top box end up doing? I threw the top box and the plate out and put a 'free' sticker on it.

View attachment 308496

Oh the atrocity!!

Well, it wasn't over yet for me tonight. The bike came with a Puig windscreen. And it's a bit big, so I figured I'd adjust it to a lower position. What an ordeal that turned out to be! I took the windscreen off -- that was easy, but when I tried to get the plastic bushing insert like things with a brass fitting inside them, it proved to be very frustrating. I am talking about the part that attaches to the bike and has a threaded hole. The rubber on these fittings were brittle so I threaded the nut in partially and tried to take them out. Three of them came out easily, and one of them was a stubborn mofo. After WD-40, vice grips and a lot of cursing, it finally came out.

View attachment 308497

The two on the left came out easy, and you can see how fucked up the parts on the right are. The insert had bulged and it was very hard to get it out. I think it was over-tightened previously. You can see the marks my vice grip left on the nut that I threaded in partially for better grip. I had put a rag around it, but that didn't help.

Pretty terrible design, IMO. I am going to email Puig and see if they'll sell me these parts. I am completely unfamiliar with this brand so I have no idea if they'll co-operate. Right now the bike is without a windscreen. I was hoping to ride it this weekend but now I'll have to ride it without a windscreen. Quite annoyed by this. Should have just left the damn thing alone.

That's about it for now. I will post more as I do more stuff to the bike. Like I said earlier -- it will all be pretty routine. I am documenting and sharing the money numbers so it helps someone else evaluate their decisions about coming to the wee side.

If you have a frame mounted skid plate that's sitting around, let me know!
 

·
Premium Member
2013 Wee-Strom
Joined
·
388 Posts
Yes absolutely would like to know! Mine isn't really as secure as I would like it to be.
Neither is mine, but I really need to take a ride to get a baseline.

To start, when I removed the stock shield, there were 4 threaded inserts that stayed in the bike. They are different than the Puig threaded inserts, and I 'assume' they are stock Suzuki. They are longer and a little thicker, but both use M5 x .08 bolts. So I bought an assortment of those from 30mm - 50mm in length. And a bunch of M6 fender washers.

Ordered this stuff.


There are 8 holes in the shield, 4 small and 4 large. Confusing. I used the purchased grommets to plug the small ones. The shield came with 4 grommets with short standoffs, say 1/4". Those went in the 4 big holes. Then using 40mm bolts, I alternated rubber washers and steel washers so the shield extended away from bike a bit. Played with this for a long time because you place the windshield exactly as you want it using more and less washers. It's now mounted using the middle holes on the bike, so it can still go one setting lower. If you want some pics, let me know. That's if it doesn't fly away on my upcoming ride!
 

·
Premium Member
2013 Wee-Strom
Joined
·
388 Posts
The windshield stayed put but I don't like it. The top of the shield is in center of my field of vision. I'm too short to look over it and looking through it is too annoying. Doesn't seem to make much difference either. Going back to the stock windshield at it highest location. So if you want pics it will be easy for me since I am removing the Puig.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #28 ·
The windshield stayed put but I don't like it. The top of the shield is in center of my field of vision. I'm too short to look over it and looking through it is too annoying. Doesn't seem to make much difference either. Going back to the stock windshield at it highest location. So if you want pics it will be easy for me since I am removing the Puig.
Yeah pictures would be helpful!
 

·
Premium Member
2013 Wee-Strom
Joined
·
388 Posts
Put the stock windshield back on this morning. The Puig and all it's hardware are still laying on the bench, so if you want more pics let me know. I added edging to the bottom of the Puig to prevent chipping.

Before and after
Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Hood Fuel tank Vehicle
Land vehicle Vehicle Wheel Automotive lighting Fuel tank
Hood Grille Vehicle Automotive design Personal luxury car

stock rubber
Wood Tints and shades Metal Font Circle

Puig vs stock inserts
Automotive tire Water Azure Liquid Camera lens

my setup using the stock inserts at the bike
Wood Musical instrument accessory Tool Audio equipment Auto part

Automotive lighting Amber Automotive tire Rim Tints and shades

Brackets that extend the Puig way out from the bike. You could make a set of those easy.
Wood Font Household hardware Automotive exterior Auto part
Font Material property Auto part Wood Electric blue

The Puig standoff and grommet
Gadget Audio equipment Electronic device Circle Auto part
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
659 Posts
Do you still need a skid plate. I have sw motech plate. sitting in my garage. 100 bucks + shipping and it is yours. I live in the Denver area 80013 zip. It came off on my 2013 Wee.
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: sr248

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Time for a quick update!

I got back from my travels and a bunch of parts were waiting for me. I got a set of Hepco Becker crash bars and Weld86 skid plate from a member here. I also bought a set of luggage racks from Happy Trails that were waiting. All the parts went on relatively easily. The right pannier pushes against the plastic exhaust cover. The instructions on the installation ask for that piece to be cut in order to clear the racks. I decided to have the rack just press against the plastic trim because I didn't to cut up a perfectly good (and maybe expensive too) trim piece.

I also discovered that my radiator fan was unplugged. I'm not sure why. This explains why the 4th temperature bar had momentarily come on. I was also low on coolant. I called the PO and asked him if he had any issues with the cooling system but he said everything was running fine. But he also didn't ride the bike very much, so I don't think his statement counts for much. The unplugged radiator fan is very puzzling, though. If anyone wants to top up their coolant without lifting the tank, here's what worked (thanks to Rick from AdventureTech for the idea!) -- there's an overflow hose that goes from the overflow tank and goes down the right side of the bike. It meets a T-shaped joint. You can detach the hose from the T-joint and pull it up and use a syringe to pump fluid through.

I set off with the bike to Atlanta. I met Rick from AdventureTech at his shop in SC and he took out the stuck bolt on the trim piece above the fuel tank. That was a huge help! On the road my windshield came off because the well nuts were not tightened enough. Rick took care of that, too and explained to me how well nuts need to be tightened enough so that the part of the nut behind the cowling can mushroom and press against the inside. I was getting a lot of buffeting with the Puig windscreen on the high position. I lowered it so my helmet is now in a bit cleaner air. It's not quite perfect though.

The bike has been great on the highway. The temp stayed steady at 3 bars and there was no trouble at all. I took the bike on some graded dirt roads near Monitcello GA in Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge. Lots of nice dirt roads in the area and a great time!

When I was considering the V-Strom I think I was most unimpressed with it's looks, but I have to admit, it's really growing on me. I often find myself admiring it when taking a break at a gast station. Here's a picture.

Tire Wheel Plant Motorcycle Vehicle
 
21 - 33 of 33 Posts
Top