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Discussion Starter #1
Yeah, taking a 20mph, 90degree turn at 35mph is generally not a good idea.

Realized I was in the turn too hot and going wide, cut the throttle slightly, got back on the throttle, leaned more and then next thing I knew bike and I lowsided and then slid maybe 20ft into a thankfully shallow ditch.

Damage Report...
Me: Bruised elbow, slightly sore knee and self confidence splattered across the corner of Sunset and Northwoods. Fortunately, the ouchies were minimal with no road rash, or broken bones. The armored jacket definitely saved my elbow from serious breakage! ATGATT!!!!

Gear: AGV textile pants are toast; side of left leg is worn through. Marsee jacket has slight hole in sleeve and is likely salvageable.

Bike: Left side is trashed. Bent rear sub-frame, broken shift lever, broken left turn signal and numerous scraped parts. Total cost: $4,100! That price will bring the bike to showroom condition; including replacing all visible and hidden parts that have even minor cosmetic damage. Fortunately, insurance is paying for all but the $250 deductible. Whew!

Mistakes I made were:
1. Entering sharp curve too fast.
2. Looking down at road and side of road instead of through the turn.
3. Cutting throttle mid-turn.

I think if I hadn't done 2 and 3, I might have saved it, or at least been able to straighten it up and ride it into the ditch.

Anyway, no sympathy wanted. Just hope you all can take this info and learn from it.

Ride safe!
 

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That stinks, sorry to hear that. It's good you're OK.

What year and model of bike is it?
 

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Sorry about your mishap,thankfully you weren't injured badly and you had your gear on,hope everything works out for the best.
 

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Glad You're OK ! :D ....
Bikes are produced around the clock and can allways be replaced.;)
Once again the truth bell rings out ATGATT,ATGATT,ATGATT!!
This cannot be over stated !

 

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Good to hear you suffered little physical damage. The gear was sacrificed as intended to save you and the bike can be repaired. All in all, the situation could have had a far worse ending. Hope you are up on two wheels soonest.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all the good wishes everyone!

The bike is a red '05 DL650. Well, now it's a red with unwanted gray and black stripes just on the left side DL650!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Good to hear you suffered little physical damage. The gear was sacrificed as intended to save you and the bike can be repaired. All in all, the situation could have had a far worse ending. Hope you are up on two wheels soonest.
Thanks for that.

At this point, my self-confidence is really in the dump and I'm not sure I'll get on the horse again. I'm thinking at the very least, ride the bike home from the dealership when it's done and see how things feel.
 

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Everyone that crashes has some self-doubt/confidence issues when they get back on the bike. It's normal. Just take it easy and you'll be fine. Everyone makes mistakes which sometime lead to crashing, so don't beat yourself up too much about it. Learn from the experience:

- Look (where you want to go, ie, corner exit)
- Lean (the bike is way more capable than most riders believe)
- Believe (stay relaxed, on the gas, don't panic)
 

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Patpuma, Listen to Garry. Self doubt/lack of confidence is a killer. You will not forget your get-off but I also know you will not forget all the fun rides and pleasure two wheels have given you. Give yourself some time.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the tips, guys!! Appreciate everyone here. This is a great message board!
 

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Been there, wrecked that. I should add that I dumped my Triumph Sprint RS about 6K miles and three months into my "reborn biker" stage. Rode for 15 years, then marriage/house/kids left me bikeless for a bit, then got a bike again. Minor rash to the bike, broke my collarbone and some ribs (old guys don't bounce well :)).

My point is:

- I learned from my primary mistake which was riding while mentally distracted due to fatigue, hunger, thirst and being low on gas, all in the middle of nowhere. Take brreaks. Stay hydrated. Stay fed. You need to be on your mental game when riding.

- My mental distraction led to being a bit late on noticing lots of gravel in a blind, decreasing radius, 25 MPH corner. Should have been no biggie, but it caught me off-guard. That was my second mistake following from #1.

- I dumped the bike because I panicked (my third mistake), stood the bike up and tried to stop before running off the road. Almost pulled it off, but my front tire plowed in the loose dirt/gravel on the shoulder and I fell over at a low speed (remember that old guys don't bounce well).

- Picking up a heavy street bike, solo, in loose dirt, with a broken collarbone was an adventure. Riding home for four hours feeling my shoulder move around when hitting potholes was, um, interesting.

Anyway, lesson learned. Got back on the bike a few weeks later, as soon as I had some reasonable mobility in my shoulder and started riding again. I was very cautious, being worried to death about gravel. It took a several hundreds of miles of riding over the course of a month (including a return to the crash site) to feel normal on the bike again. It's been over three years and 50K incident-free miles since then. Riding is like therapy for me.

You'll get there. Best of luck with getting the bike repaired quickly.
 

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Right now it feels bad and you want out. Just sit with it for a little while. Don't make any decisions right now. Yeah you feel crummy. It's O.K. to let yourself feel that way for a little while. Then think about what it will take to get back on. There is a book out about getting back on two wheels after a crash. I'll try to find it and pass it on.

I'm sure you are glad you are here to feel bad as opposed to being in the hospital. ATGATT for sure. Smart Man.

Who amonug us has never made a mistake? It could happen to anybody at any time. I sounds like you are already learning from this incident. That's a great thing and the reason you should get back in the game when you are ready. It make you that much better a rider and a stronger person.

Ride on!!
 

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I got a DL650 last January after 16 years without a bike. Last June I totaled the bike, broke my left hand and wrist plus dislocated my shoulder. It was my first accident with injury or bike damage I couldn't fix myself. My first thought after surgery was I made a mistake and would have been better off if I had never bought a bike. During the recuperation process, I got to look at how much fun I had with the bike. The more time passed the more I wanted a new bike. Now that I've been well enough to ride for a couple of months, about the only thing I think about is my new bike arriving at the dealer. I already have all the farkles to put on it. I can hardly wait.
 

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Yeah, I don't want to post it, but I almost dumped my bike the other day in almost the same way.

It was well after dark, and I had just ridden an hour and a half in 30 degree or so temps, and I had finally got back into 'civilization' and the temps were climbing into the mid 40's and I was feeling good. My GF was behind me in her Subaru (we had gone down to Albuquerque separately due to a wedding).

Anyway, there is this wacky ID check point thingy they are putting in near the labs here in Los Alamos, and it has like 3 sharp sharp turns in it. I came into the last turn a little too hot, paying too much attention to the 'Your Speed Is' thingy sitting at the apex of the corner and having forgotten just how sharp this left hander was.

I realized I had too much speed, but not by much. I had just ridden over some roads that might have been somewhat frozen, so mentally I couldn't commit to leaning harder. Instead, I stood the bike up, and laid on the brakes. Just before I came off the pavement, the back wheel started to lock up, so I let off as I didn't want to high side. I went down the ditch, missing the speed sign, and up a dirt berm. Laid into the brakes gently to prevent loosing grip on the soft dirt, down an embankment into another ditch, hit the bottom of it hard, racking myself on the seat (ow!). Popped up onto a side paved road, speed almost all gone, leaned left, and headed back to the main road.

No damage (I could have sworn I was going to blow a fork seal on that last bump), and my only 'injury' was getting kicked in the crotch by the seat. Serves me right.

The funny thing here is that I think my GF missed this entire excitement, and drove right past me, and I ended up behind her. She didn't say a word about it to me, and I was too embarrassed to bring it up.

So, there we go, now you know.

Points I learned:

1) Remember that damn curve is sharp
2) Long cold riding can give you tunnel vision
3) My 'panic' reaction seemed to pay off

So, besides being embarrassed, it kind of improved my confidence in my ability if fecal matter should impact the rotary air handler in the future. Which I hope it doesn't.

I did something like this once before, when I was a 'new' rider with only about 1500 miles under my belt. (I only have about 10k and 6 months now). I was on my Yamaha dual sport, riding with a buddy up the Santa Fe Ski hill, and I misjudged a left hander and went a tad wide, ended up going slightly off the road on the mountain side. I jumped the bike over a 4 foot drop and them put it back on the road. But damn if that sucker didn't suck up every bump. Almost wish the V-Strom had that kind of suspension ;)

Anyway.. hope you enjoyed my almost misfortune ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well, I didn't enjoy your misfortune, but did learn from it. Thanks for sharing!
 

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It is said that there are two kinds of riders: Those who have left skin on the roadway and those who will. Luckily, in your case, the damage was to your bike which is repairable. You were smart enough to have your gear on and that in itself says a lot and separates you from some of the dim bulbs on the roads these days.

You took your lumps, learn from the experience and keep on going. I left several bloody streaks on roadways when I was young and, as others pointed out, had the same self-doubts. Dont' sweat it, don't beat yourself up, don't lose your confidence. These things *DO* happen and all we can do is learn from them and make sure we don't do the same thing again.
 

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