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Listen closely young Jedi, so fail you do not! Like this one hmmm?

First off a little background on myself I'm 58 and in good physical shape. In my early twenties I worked for a trucking company changing tires on semi trucks. We did it all with hand tools, so even though it was a long time ago I figured I was a natural to change my own motorcycle tires.
I bought all the necessary tools, wheel balancer, wheel weights, valve stems and new tires. All this added up to more than the cost to have a new set of tires installed at the dealer but I figured I'd have the tools now and do all my own changes.
So I begin, I get the rear wheel off pretty smoothly and I broke the bead using a long 2x4 to pry down on the bead, this method is all over the internet and with a little effort it worked pretty well, so far so good, I'm feeling pretty good about myself at this point. Then I remove the old tire, again after a little fumbling and sweat I got it off. Still good.
Now on with the new tire, I put my rim savers on, lube up the tire and start levering on the new one. Almost immediately one of the pry bars that I really have my back into slips off and I go flying forward and smash my finger on a sharp edge on the hub! #%*¥+*^%!!! Ok ok just give me a minute to regroup, it hurts like hell but the show must go on. After about 20 minutes of wrestling tire and tire irons I finally get it on. I am completely winded and sit down to rest. As I'm sitting there, looking at the tire I realize I forgot all about directional rotation. I'm thinking I've got a 50/50 chance that it's right. If you guessed that it was wrong, give that man a Cupie doll! I'm thinking " Oh man! Now I've gotta pry that sucker off and do it all over again!"
So here we go again, only this fresh tire is much harder to remove than the old one. When I finally get it off I notice that somehow I pinched a tiny piece of the bead off, just a little spot smaller than a match head. ImageUploadedByMO Free1432507891.644006.jpg
I'm thinking not much I can do about it but forge ahead and see what happens. After another exhausting round of wrestling tire irons and needing three hands I finally get it on and fill it with air and I soap up the bead to make sure it's airtight. No such luck, the bead has a very tiny stream of bubbles coming from it. The tire has been ruined. Crap! Crap! Crap!
That's it! I'm done! I give up! I'll pay the bastards whatever they want! I'm out!
So let's recap,
One smashed finger.....check!
$231 dollars worth of tires I can't use....check!
$83 dollars worth of tire tools soon to be listed for sale......check!
One new torque wrench and metric sockets set that Harbour freight probably won't let me return....check!
One motorcycle rendered un rideable ...check!
A trip to the dealer where I have to explain why I want him to take that brand new tire off and throw it in the trash and please let me pay you another $350 to mount a set of tires for me ...check, check , check!!!!!!
Sometimes a mans just got to know
his limitations. ImageUploadedByMO Free1432508612.894776.jpg


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Sorry for your hand and wallet pain, but thank you for the good laugh. :green_lol: I feel much better about paying $46 last week to have the shop mount a set of tires.
 

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Euuueerrggh... I've had to do the "reverse my freshly mounted tire" thing a few times.


I think more riders should change their own tires, but the #1 rule above all else to remember is: if you're using a lot of force, you're doing something wrong.
 

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You could get a proper sized tube and at least save the tire. I just finished spinning on my first tire. Could have gone smoother and quicker but I got it done. Learned a few things and I am sure that the next one will go better as will the next. And so on.
Rod
 

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Try to seal it with ULTRASEAL

I think Ultraseal will take care of your leak. It may be a little difficult to get but I think it is quite potent. If you make sure it gets to the leak area after you filled the tire with the prescribed quantity, put pressure on I think it will be ok. and seal the hole.
 

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Ealier this year I decided to replace my chain and sprockets myself. I cut the chain too short. I also screwed up replacing the clutch slave cylinder. I tried all the DIY fixes to no avail, so the bike got trailered to the dealership ($100) plus $300 in labour and other bits and pieces. Having said that I now know the mistakes I made and I think I could do the work again with no problems.
I've thought about replacing my own tyres but after the chain replacement adventure I've decided to scale back my DIY work and just use my weekends to try and enjoy myself. I'm too old for this s***.
 

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I think more riders should change their own tires, but the #1 rule above all else to remember is: if you're using a lot of force, you're doing something wrong.
Absofreakinlutely the truth!
 

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I change my own unless they have stiff sidewalls like the Michelin Anakee 3's, then it's worth it to bring the wheels to my local dealer and pay the $30 for each tire.

Working with two people also makes it far easier, and I've had to use the green slime to seal a rim-leak.
 

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Wow that sucks! Sorry for your pain. Thanks for the laugh, and again for the total feeling of insecurity. I carry a kit in the top box of my bike for road side issues. Have a set of irons in there just in case I need to do an R&R of the tire. I've just never actually done a motorcycle tire. Sure done some tire's in my time, just never on the bike. Pretty concomitant mech too. But now I'm thinking I may have a false sense of security, oh well. Just gonna keep riding. Best of luck, hope your on the road soon.
 

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I change my own unless they have stiff sidewalls like the Michelin Anakee 3's, then it's worth it to bring the wheels to my local dealer and pay the $30 for each tire.

Working with two people also makes it far easier, and I've had to use the green slime to seal a rim-leak.
So that's why I found replacing the Anakee 3's hard work. I changed my own recently, and I think what I learnt from it was well worth the time it took.
 

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using tire irons can be tricky. My first crack at it a few years back resulted in a stubby screw driver ending up inside the tire - between the tube and tire - when I grabbed whatever was close to relieve my thumb pinch. Ouch. I feel your pain. Two weeks later a mysterious leak developed and I pulled the stubby.

After 2 or 3 more cracks at it, improving each time through practice and watching a bunch of YouTube videos, I knew that I'd met my match on mounting my K60s. Darn things bit my knee. Then I found this..

No-scufftiretool

works like a charm. I used a 15" rim that I bought for 10 bucks at the junkyard, old garden hose hot-glued on, threaded spindle and nuts from Home Depot and an old saw horse. The breaker bar is based on a 2x4 and the whole kit makes use of my hitch receiver for stability and to make it mobile. I also found out that the "secret sauce" was finding some tire mounting paste - which I scored from a local tire dealer who had an extra.

I probably have $150 invested all in with the bar and paste representing 3/4 of that.
 

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Mr. Bravo's (OP's) very interesting story is why, in some past threads, I've argued against encouraging non-experienced persons trying to change their bike tires - especially alone for the first time. I change mine, but I've changed bicycle, lawn mower, tractor, car / truck and motorcycle tires as the need arose through the years. I know what I'm getting into. It still really works me, and takes a fair amount of time, and isn't all that fun. I don't have all the good tire-changing tools though.

I'll continue to change my own, alone, because having it dealer-done would involve about 140-170 miles of car / truck driving, but if I lived near a dealer / person who's willing to do it for anything near a reasonable fee, and it can be done at a relatively convenient time for me, I'd let them do it. Just my opinion mind you.

Changing them oneself can be self-satisfying though. Suggest an experienced person be on hand to help with the first one or two.
 

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I started changing my own tires a couple of years ago and certainly understand the liberal use of florid prose when trying to break beads and unseat/seat the tires on the rim. The lube is a must for both removal and installation. Lots of folks use liquid soap. Many more use a dedicated tire lube product. The best I've found is a cheap vegetable oil spray--yeah, the stuff your wife uses to cook with--from the local grocer. Slick, easy to use, cheap, non-aqueous (no corrosion issues inside the rim) and biodegradable (won't harm/soften rubber). The other thing that makes the job a lot easier is heat, as in….put the wheel/old tire and the new tire out in the sunshine and drink a beer for an hour or so before you start. In the wintertime, I carry the tires into my sauna and sit for a bit and have a glass of Canadian whiskey to warm both the rubber and me…. :D
 

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Note two things about the rim. It has a drop/depressed center. This is there for you to slide the bead of one side of the tire into in order to get the bead opposite over the rim. You get one part of the bead over the rim, say the part closest to you, we'll call 6 o'clock. Move that 6 o'clock part of the tire bead down into the depressed center, and now you can fairly easily lever the bead at 12 o'clock over the rim. Flip it over and do the other side the same way. You may have to squeeze the two beads together into the depressed center to get it in the right position.

The other thing to notice is the internal safety beads/bumps/humps to keep the tubeless tire in place when flat. The lube on the tire bead needs to be in the place to slide over these humps when you're seating the bead.



Does your tire have red ink dots? Those are the stiff part of the sidewall, and they go on the low point of the rim, if you know where that is. You can rotate the bare wheel on the balance rig and with a dial indicator (or careful eye) look at any run out for the point where the bead is closest to the center of the wheel, maybe only a few thousandths of an inch of eccentricity. Mark this spot and locate the tire's red dots here. This is called match mounting. If you do this and the tire also has yellow dots, ignore the yellow dots. No tire and no wheel is perfectly uniform.

Yellow dots but no red dots (or no idea where the low point is?)? Put the heavy spot of the tire shown by the yellow dots at the valve stem location.
 

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Thanks for the laugh, but life is a journey, and I would bet you take a different route next time:) I just changed my front to a Battlewing. I bought a new set of Motion Pro spoons, rim protectors, I made my own balancer (idea is from a guy at Advrider.com)using Abec-5 bearings from my old roller blades, and Windex for lube. I plan to get some KY jelly for the rear. Windex actually worked well, but I would like to try some others. It is a bit of a pain in the butt, no doubt, but dealers want $50 each if the wheels are off the bike. I am too frugal and like to do things myself for the experience. I took my time, cleaned everything while the wheel was off too. Overall I accomplished my goal. Rear will be in a few weeks.
 

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I feel your pain. I tried mounting a K409, I think, on my 750/6. A very stiff tire. To move the tire on the rim to line the tube valve better I put a strap on the front brake lever and grabbed the tire to rotate it.
I didn't know how strong I was. I ended up throwing the bike off the center stand on it's side and cracking the right side valve cover before the tire moved enough to line up the valve properly.
What's that mechanical thing about a long enough lever arm and you could move the world?
Anyway I took it to the local tire shop for a proper mounting.
 

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A big +1.. first time I used zip ties tire nearly fell on, could not believe how easy it was....
Very interesting guys. Thanks for the tip. I'll be looking at this before tire change time.

For me, everything goes well except removal and replacement of tires on the wheel / rim. I'm all for anything that helps me with that part of the process.
 

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As I'm sitting there, looking at the tire I realize I forgot all about directional rotation.
That brought back a bad memory:mrgreen:
Some years back I had one of those Yamaha Rhino UTV's. Well I found a place selling new takeoff tires and rims for a very good price.
So I ordered the set of 4.
A few months went by before I went to put them on the Rhino-
That was when I discovered all 4 mounted tire/rims were for the right side:furious:

If you've never tried to change ATV/UTV tires, well lets just say I've changed everything from motorcycle tires to 16" heavy duty load range E truck tires and a lot of trailer tires- all are a piece of cake compared to ATV tires.
That inner bead is huge to keep the 2 PSI tires from breaking the bead in use...quite a workout on my Harbor Freight tire changer.
 
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