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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey Gang -

Am the first to admit I'm no expert on mechanical aspects of things, but I'm in the trying to learn category at age 50. :) Thanks in advance for your help with these questions!

I have an 07 Vee and am looking to add a few electrical farkles. Here are the questions:

1. With the MT spring and fall weather (and somtimes even summer), I've come to the realization that heated grips would be a very much appreciated addition for my poor hands. Forum folks seem to think Oxford Grips are a pretty good route to go so am looking at adding them on.

2. A louder horn would be nice - the Stebel seems to be a pretty popular one with folks on the forum.

3. I'd like to add a light bar and couple of small but bright front lightsl, primarily for making it so people see me better during the daytime. I ride occasionally in the evening, so they'd help then as well. Suggestions on what would be a good route to go? I'd like to keep them small in size.

4. Heated vest. Not sure I'm going to go this route though riding earlier this spring convinced me that more warmth is better in such conditions. Suggestions there?

5. I don't have a GPS. Don't know that I'll necessarily be adding one on given I have a Droid and it can handle most things. But, one never knows . . .

6. I ride two up about 1/3 of the time. So, am debating some kind of set up to be able to visit with each other during the ride. Suggestions on what works well?


With all or most of the above additions, I'm guessing that I shouldn't or can't just directly attach to the battery with the various wires, especially with light and vest demands/loads. Eastern Beaver comes up frequently for the kit set up for streamlining such additions. Any other suggestions for someone who is new to this arena, whether in what to add on for farkles or best way to go for making it work electrically?

Thanks bunches for any and all input!

M
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The Vee has a limited electrical capacity. Anything that creates heat is a major electrical draw. You have about 125-150W of power above what is typically used in a stock configuration. Heated gear leaves little power left for light. LEDs provide more light for fewer watts but cost more money. The less expensive ones do well for "see me" lights. Get two to create a triangle of light along with the headlights. Light bars under the fairing chin are too close to the headlights to create a triangle. There need to be lower and be well separated. Halogen lights create heat so draw a lot of power.

I like 35W HID replacement headlights to provide more light than stock but use fewer watts. An added bonus is they provide a constant light level with anything from about 9-16V. Stock lighting gets dimmer when heated gear is drawing power. Solid state variable heat controllers cycle on for part of every second in use, being on for all of that second only when set on full. Turn heated gear on half power and the lights switch between full power and partial power every half second. Before I got HIDs, it looked like I had a headlight modulator in cold weather. In the daytime, one headlight can be shut off to save power for heated gear.

A heated vest may run around 35-40W, a jacket 60-90W, grips 15-18W/pair and gloves 25-30W/pair. I started out with grips and vest myself but they only took the edge off. If I ride in 35 degree weather for an hour, I want a heated jacket, gloves, grips and socks. YMMV. Keeping two people warm will probably have you looking at chemical or rechargeable battery pack heat in addition to the bike's output.

GPS and communications equipment are solid state so don't consume many watts. A Stebel is a big draw but rarely in use so you don't need to subtract the horn's draw from the available power.

Do a search from the Google box at the top of the page for fuse blocks for lots of info.
 

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I have added most of your wish list to my 2006 DL650 some time ago and forget some of the details but I can recommend Eastern Beaver for quality wiring kits for almost any purpose. Suzuki VStrom Electrics

I added a fuse box for my electrical add-ons: Zumo 550, heated grips, Stebel horn, charging port in tank bag for Iphone.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks much, guys! Greywolf - where did you acquire your 35w HID replacements? Longevity? Special aiming? Will search more on forum to see if youve already shared this info before. Thanks much! M
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The aim is unchanged from stock and the lamp section separates from the wire connection to allow use with the stock rubber covers if bought here. The kit includes a headlight relay which I think all our bikes should have. 4300K gives the most light and I think the white light it provides is best too. Blue is getting popular but it's bad for night vision and fog.
 

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2. A louder horn would be nice - the Stebel seems to be a pretty popular one with folks on the forum.

3. I'd like to add a light bar and couple of small but bright front lightsl, primarily for making it so people see me better during the daytime. I ride occasionally in the evening, so they'd help then as well. Suggestions on what would be a good route to go? I'd like to keep them small in size.

5. I don't have a GPS. Don't know that I'll necessarily be adding one on given I have a Droid and it can handle most things. But, one never knows . . .

. Eastern Beaver comes up frequently for the kit set up for streamlining such additions.
Thanks bunches for any and all input!

M
Hello MissoulaMike
HORN - I have the Stebel Horn mounted on the left side of my bike, it can be heard by all - even on the freeway I've had people jump back into their lane. Gary at PWD has a great set-up.
BAR - Gary will also have a Light bracket that you are looking for, I have this on my Wee, but I have LED's mounted, not the brightest during the day, but at night they give off a great glow. I am now replacing the H3 bulbs with LED's in a foglight set, I'll have these mounted soon I hope.

BEAVER - Eastern Beaver is THE place to go to for an extra fuse box. I have mine mounted under the seat, most added electrical items are connected thru this fuse box, this way I wont blow the bike fuses, and I can have switched or unswitched connections. The instructions are very simple and Jim will answer your questions.
GPS - ?? Not my area, I have AAA. For charging handheld units, I have a triple cig. lighter in my tankbag and just one wire coming up from under my seat.

Have fun Farkling, I know you'll get great info here, use the google search at the top of the page to search the forum( Thanks for that tip G.W. !!),
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You guys are GREAT!! Thanks so very much! Am pursuing those suggestions and resources and will see what I can come up with. Hoping to see you all at Boise and continue to learn as much as I can from all the experience available! :)

Cheers from Missoula - M
 

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3. I'd like to add a light bar and couple of small but bright front lightsl, primarily for making it so people see me better during the daytime. I ride occasionally in the evening, so they'd help then as well. Suggestions on what would be a good route to go? I'd like to keep them small in size.
Here's my solution for low-wattage lights for conspicuity: http://www.stromtrooper.com/v-strom-modifications-performance/41386-fork-mounted-led-cop-lights-%3D-ultimate-running-lights.html
They don't put light on the road, but I don't think you could do much better to improve your visibility to oncoming traffic.

It's hard to get both good visibility to others and good illumination for yourself from the same lights. Read on:

For throwing light on the road without using up all your available power, there are a number of LED driving/spot light packages available now. I believe the Vision-X Solstice (aka Denali from Twisted Throttle) are some of the smallest. To be useful as driving lights, they need to be mounted as high as possible (near the headlights). This is especially important since none of the LED driving lights have a beam cutoff at the top -- if not aimed properly they create a lot of glare for oncoming traffic, which actually makes it more difficult for others to judge your distance and speed. If the lights are up high, you can aim them down a bit to avoid blinding oncoming traffic while still getting useful light on the road for yourself.

But to be really useful for conspicuity, aux lights need to be as far from the headlights as possible -- the triangle of lights Greywolf mentioned. Other than running lights, the only lights that should be mounted down low are fog lights with a true fog beam: wide and flat, so the light can shine on the road without being reflected back to your eyes by water droplets in the air. But driving lights (a spot beam with no cutoff) on the forks can't throw their light very far down the road without being aimed high enough to blind oncoming traffic.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Here's my solution for low-wattage lights for conspicuity: http://www.stromtrooper.com/v-strom-modifications-performance/41386-fork-mounted-led-cop-lights-%3D-ultimate-running-lights.html
They don't put light on the road, but I don't think you could do much better to improve your visibility to oncoming traffic.

It's hard to get both good visibility to others and good illumination for yourself from the same lights. Read on:

For throwing light on the road without using up all your available power, there are a number of LED driving/spot light packages available now. I believe the Vision-X Solstice (aka Denali from Twisted Throttle) are some of the smallest. To be useful as driving lights, they need to be mounted as high as possible (near the headlights). This is especially important since none of the LED driving lights have a beam cutoff at the top -- if not aimed properly they create a lot of glare for oncoming traffic, which actually makes it more difficult for others to judge your distance and speed. If the lights are up high, you can aim them down a bit to avoid blinding oncoming traffic while still getting useful light on the road for yourself.

But to be really useful for conspicuity, aux lights need to be as far from the headlights as possible -- the triangle of lights Greywolf mentioned. Other than running lights, the only lights that should be mounted down low are fog lights with a true fog beam: wide and flat, so the light can shine on the road without being reflected back to your eyes by water droplets in the air. But driving lights (a spot beam with no cutoff) on the forks can't throw their light very far down the road without being aimed high enough to blind oncoming traffic.
By golly, if they can't see "them there lights, " then they shouldn't be on the road! Holy Buckets! Nicely done! :) Thanks for the tips!
 

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Mike,

Yes you can attach all your electrical items to the battery posts, but the result ain't pretty. First, get longer bolts for the battery posts. Every separate item needs its own fuse in its positive wire, and you need to run the negative wires back to the battery or to a main negative wire you run off the battery. (It is poor practice to "ground" the negative wires to the frame on a steel & aluminum frame like ours.)

The Stebel horn does need to go to the battery due to its high current draw. The Pat Walsh kit is a good one.

As said above, the auxiliary lights too close to the headlights don't get seen. I'm not a fan of the lights too low down and close together on the forks. Try different locations to get good visibility by others as wide apart as you can get them and still likely keep them from getting knocked off. The Strom headlights are better than most bikes, so auxiliary driving lights aren't needed as much. If you don't use HID lights, a headlight wiring harness (Eastern Beaver or other) added to the plus-50 headlights like these lights up the road well. Avoid blue bulbs.
 

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If you don't mind my jumping into your thread, I'm curious whether or not a 12V cigarette type outlet should go to the Fuzeblock, or to the battery. The use will be for an Aerostich compressor if I need to fill a tire. I'm guessing it pulls too many amps for the Fuzeblock, which maxes out at 10 amps. Or am I wrong?
 

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The aim is unchanged from stock and the lamp section separates from the wire connection to allow use with the stock rubber covers if bought here. The kit includes a headlight relay which I think all our bikes should have. 4300K gives the most light and I think the white light it provides is best too. Blue is getting popular but it's bad for night vision and fog.
Does the relay included with the HID lights substitute for the 4H headlight relay from Eastern Beaver for our bikes? Thanks for your input as always.
 

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Yes, either HID relay or other headlight relay, not both.

A 10 amp fuse block doesn't do much. You'd need to go to the direct to the battery for a high power horn, and you need the compressor specs.

And, don't forget to add a CELL PHONE JAMMER to your electrical gear.
Portable Cell Phone Jammers : Mobile Phone Jammer
 

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The aim is unchanged from stock and the lamp section separates from the wire connection to allow use with the stock rubber covers if bought here. The kit includes a headlight relay which I think all our bikes should have. 4300K gives the most light and I think the white light it provides is best too. Blue is getting popular but it's bad for night vision and fog.
I couldn't fit my rubber covers over the HIDs due to the larger diameter. Do you mean the black cylinder on the back of the bulbs can be removed, or did you just really stretch things out?

I cut the covers to have a larger diameter, but went too large.

I bought another pair new. I plan to just make a single slit from center to edge, in order to "snap" around the bulb. I think the diameter of the black section will fit inside of the rubber cover, it's just hard to get over the larger-diameter end. I will do a trial run with my destroyed rubber covers just to make sure the outer edge is stiff enough to stay attached to the headlight housing.
 

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Hey Gang -

Am the first to admit I'm no expert on mechanical aspects of things, but I'm in the trying to learn category at age 50. :) Thanks in advance for your help with these questions!

I have an 07 Vee and am looking to add a few electrical farkles. Here are the questions:

1. With the MT spring and fall weather (and somtimes even summer), I've come to the realization that heated grips would be a very much appreciated addition for my poor hands. Forum folks seem to think Oxford Grips are a pretty good route to go so am looking at adding them on.

2. A louder horn would be nice - the Stebel seems to be a pretty popular one with folks on the forum.

3. I'd like to add a light bar and couple of small but bright front lightsl, primarily for making it so people see me better during the daytime. I ride occasionally in the evening, so they'd help then as well. Suggestions on what would be a good route to go? I'd like to keep them small in size.

4. Heated vest. Not sure I'm going to go this route though riding earlier this spring convinced me that more warmth is better in such conditions. Suggestions there?

5. I don't have a GPS. Don't know that I'll necessarily be adding one on given I have a Droid and it can handle most things. But, one never knows . . .

6. I ride two up about 1/3 of the time. So, am debating some kind of set up to be able to visit with each other during the ride. Suggestions on what works well?


M
I have a stebel horn with the screaming banshee electronics. It lets you keep your existing horn for polite "peeps" 1/4 second later you are shattering eardrums! I had already ordered the horn from Twisted Throttle with their wiring harness, but if you buy the whole setup form screaming banshee you won't need anything else. I have it mounted with Twisted Throttles bracket under the left side of the fairing. Welcome to Screaming Banshee - Loud Motorcycle Horns and Safety Systems

Sorry I can't help with the other items. Bike came with factory heated grips (don't use them here in Mexico) and previous owner had installed extra lights on the engine guard. My GPS and phone or radar detector plugs into 12 volt outlets I mounted around the ignition.

I bought a handlebar mounted waterproof case for my cell phone, but it had 2 problems. Screen was impossible to see in any kind of sunlight, although it kept the phone handy for checking at stops (gloves off!) but the last time I used it I didn't lock the case into the mount properly and lost my phone somewhere down the road. After buying a new phone for $700 it's staying safely in my tankbag or better yet a zipped pocket.
 

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