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I will explain a riding technique problem I have experienced twice now and ask if someone with a lot more skill or experience than me can explain what I should be doing.
Approached a corner at about 70 or 80 Kms as I tip it in suddenly realize this is a bit too quick (for my ability)first reaction back off, probably too much, get the wobbles up .
I have read some suggestions that a heap of back brake will correct the situation My thinking is back off a little, a bit of back brake and maybe more pressure on the inside peg.
Am I on the right path here ?
Help
 

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A heap of back brake will most likely end up in a hi-side....
A little bit of trail brake on the rear will stablise the bike, but the best bit of advise I have been given is to "just push the inside bar down further, and you'll be surprised on how quick you can actually go round the corner", "worst case is a low side which is far better than a hi-side"
This from a very experienced road racer.
 

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Slow down to begin with. Add power through the curve. It's better to learn and practice the correct procedure. If you get is trouble anyway and aren't dragging a footpeg, you can push the inside bar forward to increase the learn and turn sharper. You can also shift your body weight inward which will also work even if you are dragging a footpeg.
 

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Sounds like you could use a fork stabilizer, too. also, make sure your tire pressures are not too high compared to the recommended. Also check your pivot head bearings by getting the front wheel in the air (not popping a wheelie) like on your center stand and weight on the back of the bike or a rope holding the front end up or something that doesn't mess with the forks. Then try pulling up and forward on the front wheel to see if the bearings are loose. There should be no play in there. Good luck.Bob
 

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Braking in a corner can stand up and straighten the bike, taking you to the outside even quicker. As counter-intuitive as it seems, just a little throttle can help you tighen up the corner. Super cheesy production, but, even after decades of riding, I found value in Keith Code's old "Twist of the Wrist" video. It's on YouTube. Sorry, this site won't let me post a link yet.
 

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Turn your head and look where you want to go.

Don't look where you don't want to go.

You will surprise how well it works.
 

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Look as far ahead as possible and slow down before the corner.
Slow in and fast out is the technique I use, ie accelerating through the corner nothing makes a bike go wide as easy as no throttle in the corner.
Keep your head level and as said before, look where you want to go.
Hope this helps, take it easy and enjoy it.
 

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Great suggestions, especially looking through the corner at where you want to go.

I found a couple of years ago I was out braking myself into the corner on a regular basis. So I headed to my favourite 20km of twistys, by myself. First run was fairly slow, trying not to use any brakes at all, just getting speed right and accelerating out. Each run got a bit quicker until probably 5 runs later and my confidence was back and I've enjoyed the twistys more ever since.
I'm 51 and been riding since I was 14, so not a new rider by any stretch of the imagination!
 

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Every one has a tendency to initiate the turn early. That's because we are "scanners", but going into a turn you should narrow your focus as well as look as far ahead as possible. The goal is to get to a comfortable speed at a late apex.
Once you initiate the turn, add throttle. Avoid large throttle/braking inputs which destabilize the suspension. That's the goal anyway.. Conscious practice is definitely required.

I'm lucky to hit half my turns the way I want..:yesnod:
 

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I will explain a riding technique problem I have experienced twice now and ask if someone with a lot more skill or experience than me can explain what I should be doing.
Approached a corner at about 70 or 80 Kms as I tip it in suddenly realize this is a bit too quick (for my ability)first reaction back off, probably too much, get the wobbles up .
I have read some suggestions that a heap of back brake will correct the situation My thinking is back off a little, a bit of back brake and maybe more pressure on the inside peg.
Am I on the right path here ?
...

You are on the right path since you are asking what to do. That makes you a better rider than many that never think about what they do.

If you made it through the turn after doing what you did then odds are you could have made the turn just fine by riding it out. You would have had to force yourself to keep pressure on the inside handlebar, use a steady throttle setting or gently change it, and look where you want to go; but it takes practice and confidence to know and do those things.

You don't have the confidence or experience just yet...you might want to take some performance oriented riding courses or study and gradually work up to it. There are books and video that can go over much of it as well.

If you are doing self-study I would suggest that you learn and understand what "late apex" means. The concept will make you a much safer rider on the twisties.


..Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Mug Rider

Thanks for the replys guys. You have given me plenty to work on.
Yes I have been looking at doing a rider training course .
 

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Lots of good info for thought and discussion here. I personally found the warning about too much rear brake = highside potential very helpful and a good reminder to me here in the frozen north; a local rider forgot to avoid painted road surfaces one cool and wet morning while accelerating to join a highway. He lost traction on his rear wheel (much like locking it from too much rear brake). The bike tracking must have torqued a bit at that point and he was highsided off his bike when the rear wheel regained some bite. Ouch.

I'm a big believer in practicing as much as possible, and never tire of watching the Keith Code stuff. I've also found value in reading (and following) "The Pace".
 

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Look as far ahead as possible and slow down before the corner.
Slow in and fast out is the technique I use, ie accelerating through the corner nothing makes a bike go wide as easy as no throttle in the corner.
Keep your head level and as said before, look where you want to go.
Hope this helps, take it easy and enjoy it.
I find that I turn too sharp if not using enough throttle. In fact, that's one of the ways I adjust my line going through a corner. If I find myself turning in too much I roll on the throttle.

I'm certainly not an expert, though. I've had no formal training (or informal for that matter) and usually take a somewhat leisurely pace through the local twisty (yes, it's just one).
 

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I find that I turn too sharp if not using enough throttle. In fact, that's one of the ways I adjust my line going through a corner. If I find myself turning in too much I roll on the throttle.

I'm certainly not an expert, though. I've had no formal training (or informal for that matter) and usually take a somewhat leisurely pace through the local twisty (yes, it's just one).
Yes, rolling on throttle straightens the bike up....

You've had enough concepts offered here to keep you busy for quite a while, (if not forever!). I would take one at a time, like looking where you want to go, and work on it until it's pretty automatic, then add another one, say weight on the inside/head level, and so on. Of course, you are going to be putting them all in practice with each turn, but being conscious of one helps make each automatic.

Go out and get some seat time now. You can do too much internalizing...
And see if you can find a route that includes the opposite direction turn!!:thumbup:
 

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I try to get all the braking done before the corner. I do not like applying the brakes in a corner. One problem I have is when I look far ahead to the exit of the corner I tend to want to cross the line (as in double yellow line :yikes:). Not good. I have to concentrate on not doing that while riding. Practice practice.
 

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Braking before the corner should be the standard procedure but I've found myself coming in to a corner too hot a few times and have had to keep the rear brake on even after I started the corner (ABS helps here). Even a little front is okay at the entrance before your lean angle gets too severe as long as the road is offering good traction. The Strom has sufficient clearance so don't be afraid to push it over especially if you have street tires and I have even heard of riders "dragging pegs" with dual sport tires too. I chant "trust your tires, trust your tires" when in that situation (I have Pilot Roads) and they have never let me down. The alternative is crossing the line in a right hander or running off the road in a left which usually doesn't end up well.
 

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Proper cornering is a perishable skill that keeps all of us mortals busy for a lifetime. Very rare is the curve that I consider to have taken perfectly. Here are a few easy tips for a beginner:
- Slow in, fast out.
- Braking in curves is a scary thing, only to be used in emergencies. (To not hit stuff...)
- Tires have a limited amount of traction. It gets divvied up between lateral Gs (turning) and longitudinal Gs (braking). Don't waste it!
- Look at your mid-turn target until almost there, then look at your exit point. DO NOT look at the edge of the road or that man hole cover or miniature poodle or oil spot or....
- Take training as soon as possible.

Have fun!
 

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In a track school, they taught that the first step in faster cornering (or think of it as sharper cornering) is to put your chin over towards the inside mirror. That leans your body in some without going overboard. I also put my knee out at the same time. The bike will turn harder without feeling like it is when you put more weight on the inside of the turn. If you are not dragging your pegs, the bike will turn harder. If you are dragging your pegs, you are cornering too hard for the street. I suggest doing a track day or school to learn your limits and those of the bike. It will make you safer on the street.
 

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"a bit too quick" We've all done that.
"first reaction back off" Maybe OK, depending on what part of the turn
"get the wobbles up" Mechanical issues. The bike should crash without wobbling.
" a heap of back brake will correct the situation" Truly bad idea.
"a bit of back brake" Moderately bad idea.
"more pressure on the inside peg." Wrong concept.
"Am I on the right path here ?" Nope.

Number one, correct whatever is causing the wobbles. It might be steering stem bearings, it might be a cupped front tyre. A fork brace will help, but there is an underlying mechanical problem that must be repaired first.

To make a good turn:
--enter the turn wide to the outside and go deep into the turn. This gives you the best sight line to pick the best exit line and allows a faster exit.
--Get your body's center of mass to the inside of the turn. If you have more weight on the inside peg because your body is to the inside, OK. If you put your weight on the inside peg and push your body to the outside, bad. Intentionally leaning your body toward the pavement is critically important and hard to do. It takes mental discipline.
--Point your chin at the turn exit. Look through the turn while, at the same time, scanning for the lane position, pavement hazards, etc. (Pointing the chin gets the head turned to look through the turn plus keeps the eyes level.)
--Slow as you enter the turn. Use both front & rear brakes. Braking approaching the "turn point" transfers weight to the front tyre for more grip.
--At your deepest point into the turn you want to be going the slowest. This is the "turn point."
--Take a good look at your turn exit and pick your exit route. Ideally the closest point to the inside edge of your lane would be about 2/3rds of the way through a 90° turn, but you need to avoid pavement hazards, traffic, etc., as well as set up for the next turn.
--Turn sharpest at this slowest part of the turn, the turn point. You're countersteering, right? Push on the right grip to turn right, push harder to turn sharper, pull back on the right grip to straighten from a right turn. Countersteer harder to tighten the turn. There is no other correct way to turn the bike.
--Accelerate out of the turn along your chosen exit route and set yourself up for the next turn entry.
--If you're going going faster than you think you should, don't give up. There is no magic antidote. Your only good option is to ride it out. You'll probably not crash. Your tires have more grip on clean pavement than you know. If your pegs or boots scrape, don't flinch, don't sit upright away from the pavement, don't chop the throttle, don't brake. Keep riding through the turn using good technique. Rolling on the throttle stands the bike up. Braking or chopping the throttle drops the bike into the turn. Leaning your body up away from the pavement pushes the bike down toward the pavement for more scraping.
 
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