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I'm very interested in joining the LAPD reserves (eventually as a motorcycle officer) and there doesn't seem to be a great deal of information on the topic.

I have no idea whether there are many motorcycle officer or just regular officers from police departments around the country on this forum but on the chance that there are, I'm opening up this thread as somewhere to share your experiences (either on a bike or in a car).

Info such as what bike you ride on duty/off duty, favorite parts of the job, least-favorite parts, hairy incidents, etc. Basically anything interesting that you think others would enjoy reading about -- please share! (But only if you feel comfortable doing so.)

I think the topic is extremely interesting and would love some info into the daily life of those who keep us safe every day.
 

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I'm not a motor cop, but I ride, practice, and have tought with a few ex motor officers. Keep in mind that the failure rate for motor officer training school is about 80% nationwide. I think some advanced motor skills classes might help you out. Even after some motor officer prep classes I have taken, there is no way I can keep up with them when running cone courses. Just a thought...
 

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There's a series of documentary films that might give you a good start. They all have "Police Academy" in the name. You might want to start with "Police Academy, Citizens on Patrol."

;)
 

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I don't know about LAPD but PAsadena isn't hiring much and to be a motor officer you have to be good on the bike.
Pasadena has badged in it's most recent rookie and he won't get full time until some one else expires or retires due to the budget.
That would be my Grandson. My ex son-in-law has been the top gun in the police rodeos a few times. Usually he or his partner do well.
Oh, you may want to graduate from one of the Police Academies with honors to get hired and your graduation certificate is only good for a couple years.
 

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Hi, I did motors for a large department back in 92-95. Went to the detectives and then made sergant, back onto the street. It is a very competitive process, starting with getting onto a department. That in itself is tough nowadays, with the economy. Once on, you generally have to do 2-3 years regular patrol, then you compete for an opening. They look at things like the number of summons you write a month, and what they are for. Anyone can write equipment violations, they look at moving violations, and accident investigations.

I enjoyed my time on motors.....
 

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As a reserve motor officer, would that be just escort for funerals and parades?
 

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I'd check that they even have reserves on motors.

I was on our motor unit for 8 years, 4 of that as supervisor. I can tell you the cost of the equipment, the cost and frequency of the training that is required, not to mention bikes set aside for reserves (our guys were assigned their own bikes) would preclude you from the program at my dept.

Motors is probably, day to day, the most dangerous assignment you can get. Fun, but dangerous. As lead instructor and being responsible for check-offs on our guys (when I was over that unit), I absolutely would not have approved reserves on our motors. If you don't ride every day like my guys did, you simply could not maintain necessary skills. But don't feel bad, I've lost quite a bit of my skills since I went back to patrol.:mrgreen:
 

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If you want to learn to ride the motor patrol cone courses, you should purchase the ride like a pro DVD's. I bought the whole series and the book and there's a lot to learn in there, even for someone that's ridden their entire life.
 

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In our Service, bikes were only used for traffic enforement and escorts. While some officers like that work, most want to do more and find different aspects of the job.
For my last 4 years, I had a traffic section under my command.To get on the bikes, you first had to earn a place in a traffic section, which generally took 4-5 years on. then get a place on one of the rare M/C courses (convince me), then hope there were enough people working on any given day to fill the cars. Then you might get on the bike.

While I think there might have been a couple of reserve officers attached to our Central Traffic unit, none of my reserve officers went anywhere near a bike.

Somehow, my car kept being given away so I had no choice but to ride.:thumbup:
 
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