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Impressive indeed. Wet and a narrow escape route into oncoming traffic. Most who haven't practiced emergency evasive maneuvers would instinctively have target fixation on either the offensive vehicle, or oncoming traffic.
 

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WOW! quick controlled swerve
 

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wonder if he did a u turn and ticketed the shit out of the cager
 

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It was fortunate the left turner didn't slam on his brakes or it would have been a different outcome. Very lucky.
 

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So----what movements did the rider make to swerve around the car? I think I know, but let's open this up as a learning opportunity.
 

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wonder if he did a u turn and ticketed the shit out of the cager
At the end of the video the reporter said he didn't turn around because of the road conditions, BUT he may know who the car belongs to and will at least have a talk with them. I could imagine how that would go "yeah Bill....about the other morning...dafuq man?!" I don't know the traffic laws but wouldn't that be considered reckless endangerment or something?

I watched the video a few times and all I can tell is he probably let off the throttle (maybe brake a little too) and leaned left? He was already near the center stripe so maybe his quick thought process was "crap if I can manage to only get a glancing blow from this I'll be lucky" or "THREAD THE NEEDLE!!!!!!!!".
 

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At least oncoming pickup truck was polite enough to pull towards the shoulder for him, that may have made the difference. Some people just have a disconnect between their eyes and brain when it comes to seeing an approaching motorcycle.
 

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he probably let off the throttle (maybe brake a little too) and leaned left?
Countersteered by a push on the left grip. Can't lean the bike with body weight or weighting a peg fast enough.
Pulled back on the left grip to straighten.
 

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At least oncoming pickup truck was polite enough to pull towards the shoulder for him, that may have made the difference. Some people just have a disconnect between their eyes and brain when it comes to seeing an approaching motorcycle.
That was my first impression too. But looking at it again, I'm not sure it was politeness. I think the truck may have been following too closely to begin with. When the car started to turn, the truck didn't brake but rather moved to the right to get around the car. I think it's even possible that the tailgating truck may have contributed to the car driver's decision to make a quick turn rather than braking and making a proper turn.

Whatever the reason, if the truck hadn't been over that far to the right this would have been a violent crash!
 

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Whatever the reason, if the truck hadn't been over that far to the right this would have been a violent crash!
"Polite" may have been tongue-in-cheek.
 

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Off the throttle, brake in a straight line as long as possible to scrub off speed, ease off the brakes and counter-steer left, press hard, then counter-steer right and press hard again.
 

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Countersteered by a push on the left grip. Can't lean the bike with body weight or weighting a peg fast enough.
Pulled back on the left grip to straighten.
I agree, except if the Ofc was trained properly, he would have pushed left, then just as he cleared the rear of the car he would have pushed right. Pulling left takes much more effort than pushing right & I think it would cause a little delay in the reaction time.

Silverback, hard to tell on the video, but I doubt any brakes were used at all and that's the whole point of the countersteer maneuver. It is for those times when you do not have enough braking distance to avoid a collision. The beauty of it is we can practice this maneuver every single day we ride at speeds over 15-20mph. Any time I see road debris in my lane(like a chunk of a tire) I aim right at it, then countersteer around it at the last moment. Pretend these are cars, identify your escape route around the obstacle, then countersteer. The more you do it, the better you will become. The higher your speed, the harder you push left/right, the further you can make the bike swerve out of harms way. Do this enough and it becomes second nature and that is what you need in an instance like on the video.

One more thing, the Ofc should have anticipated that move by the car since it was a perfect scenario for a left turn in front of him. The car had slowed, there was a street for the car to turn into so as a rider we must assume that is what was going to happen. I think the Ofc did a great job, but I bet even he would tell you he failed to read the traffic ahead of him at that particular moment.
 

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I have a bit of an advantage in this discussion since this is actually my video. If you look you'll see that there was another oncoming car that blocked my view of the Toyota until I was pretty close to the intersection. That section of Hwy 240 has dozens of driveways on both sides and several intersecting roads within a couple miles. I can't slow down for every driveway or intersection but I am always anticipating other cars will turn in front of me.

When the Toyota came into view I rolled off the throttle anticipating they might turn. When I saw the car start to move making a turn I applied brakes to get rid of as much speed as I could and actually got a slight chatter off the rear ABS. I was waiting as long as I could to see if the car was going to stop or continue its turn. I came off my brakes and counter-steered left as hard as I could. As I was going around the rear of the Toyota I actually thought I was going to catch my saddle bag on the car and was preparing to go down.

We talk about and train for this scenario a lot in our monthly motor training and have discussed several different strategies. I have responded to countless crashes where one car turns in front of another car and except for a couple, the driver reacting swerves right and crashes into the side of the car turning in front of it. Our strategy is to aim for the rear of the car turning in front of you and hope they don’t stop.

I would love to be able to say that it was my incredible riding skills coupled with my lightning fast reactions that allowed me to miss that car but it was just a trained response to a scenario that I have trained for and played out in my head hundreds of times. Had the driver stopped in the middle of the turn I would have hit them and probably been thrown into the oncoming Ford.
 

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So----what movements did the rider make to swerve around the car? I think I know, but let's open this up as a learning opportunity.
I'm a pretty new rider so I look forward to being wrong and told why.

I can't tell if there was braking, but it's obvious trying to stop in time wouldn't help. Looked like two quick counter-steers to me. One to the left to get around, then one to the right before he was even past the car to avoid the oncoming traffic.

But I'd say the most important thing he did here happened way before this incident. He had enough training so that he didn't have to think. There wasn't enough time to think. There was a judgement of how will braking help, road conditions, knowing to counter-steer vs lean, and packaging the counter-steers to stay on the open road.
 

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I have a bit of an advantage in this discussion since this is actually my video. If you look you'll see that there was another oncoming car that blocked my view of the Toyota until I was pretty close to the intersection. That section of Hwy 240 has dozens of driveways on both sides and several intersecting roads within a couple miles. I can't slow down for every driveway or intersection but I am always anticipating other cars will turn in front of me.

When the Toyota came into view I rolled off the throttle anticipating they might turn. When I saw the car start to move making a turn I applied brakes to get rid of as much speed as I could and actually got a slight chatter off the rear ABS. I was waiting as long as I could to see if the car was going to stop or continue its turn. I came off my brakes and counter-steered left as hard as I could. As I was going around the rear of the Toyota I actually thought I was going to catch my saddle bag on the car and was preparing to go down.

We talk about and train for this scenario a lot in our monthly motor training and have discussed several different strategies. I have responded to countless crashes where one car turns in front of another car and except for a couple, the driver reacting swerves right and crashes into the side of the car turning in front of it. Our strategy is to aim for the rear of the car turning in front of you and hope they don’t stop.

I would love to be able to say that it was my incredible riding skills coupled with my lightning fast reactions that allowed me to miss that car but it was just a trained response to a scenario that I have trained for and played out in my head hundreds of times. Had the driver stopped in the middle of the turn I would have hit them and probably been thrown into the oncoming Ford.
Right, so there goes my guesswork. I guess I should have trained harder to read the whole thread before replying!

Glad you made it through ok. And I'd say your fast reflexes were a deciding factor. Reflexes are a trained response.

At the risk of demonstrating I didn't read the whole thread again, what kind of bike was that?
 

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I'm riding a 2013 BMW R 1200 RTP.

Reacting quickly was a decided factor. Knowing what you are going to do ahead of time helps speed up that process.
 
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