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Discussion Starter #1
Well, I just took a deposit on my Strom. The buyer seems like a straight up guy and I'm confident he'll do right by her ... but I'm still going to miss her. :crying2:

I didn't REALLY want to sell her, but I can't keep more than one full bike rego and the 650 isn't really enough for the two up riding I'm doing most of the time now.

I'll be pointing the new owner here, I don't think there's a better source of advice on these beasts anywhere, and I've included a Stromtrooper patch in the stuff I'm giving him.

At least I got plenty of pictures of this bike, something I've missed out on in the past.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What's your next bike?

A BMW R1150RT.
There's one reason, and one reason alone, that I'm selling the Strom. Wifey has decided she likes riding with me and the 650 isn't quite enough bike for the two of us. Had she not developed the taste, and needed a lower seat than Stroms provide, I wouldn't even think about selling. The 1150 is "more" in ways I don't need when riding solo, but do when touring two up.
 

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The Stroms are capable, but for 2 up riding it's hard to beat the RT, and keeping Wifey happy is job one. Since the new wc 1200's, I've noticed a lot of great bargains on the older RT's around here.
 

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I really enjoy switching back and forth between the DL650 and my 1100 RT. During the hot months I/we usually ride the Strom unless it's a long trip. You will love the RT, basically the same as mine, except dual plugged, 50cc more, 10hp, and a sixth gear.
FWIW, my 00 RT is the coolest big ( over a litre ) bike I've ever had, all that wind tunnel testing was worth it because very little engine heat hits the rider, it shoots by about three inches outside your calf.
It's tough selling bikes that worked well for you, I know, I just sold a 84 R100RT that I had for 32 years.:bom_sad3:
Have fun.
 

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As a solo bike I prefer my Wee to the 1100RT that I had. It's lighter so when it goes to sleep, it's easier to pick up again.
Less maintenance too.
Only thing the RT had is more power which could be had with the 1000 Strom.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
You'll come crawling back. :p
Not so long as I'm mostly riding two up. If it was all solo riding ... maybe :fineprint:
 

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As someone who moved the other way, from an '09 R1200GS through several others to a Wee...I'd say you'll miss it and you'll be back.

The ergos on the BMWs are excellent. The engineering is amazing. But those are HEAVY monsters - I had a leg issue develop on a long road trip that took me through Joplin, Missouri. Five days after the tornado, which, being on the road, I knew nothing about.

My leg was painful and swollen and there were NO medical facilities available for any but the most emergent needs. I had to make it to Texas to get to medical care, and I did...but the thought of losing it on that big, heavy monster; or even just saddling up or stopping at lights...was scary.

The Wee, being over 300 pounds lighter, is much more to my current abilities. Yes, I miss the 130-mph Yee-HAAA! runs. Once in a while I do. Most of the time those are impossible anyway.

I guess it depends on how often the wife likes to ride along. If she's with you all the time, it's a good choice. If not...you may want a smaller machine for solo trips.

Have you thought about teaching her to ride her own?
 

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Actually I believe the wee to be about 50 lbs lighter than a 1200 gs. We sold our '13 1200RT and picked up a '16 GS that the little woman rides mostly. The RT was slightly heavier than the GS, but the lightest in its class. Personally, after riding the newer water cooled BMW's, I couldn't see going back to the air cooled, but they are still fine machines that will serve you well.
I met a CHP officer at a competition with 180,000 miles on his air RT. Still running fine are all those hard miles, yet being retired due to its mileage
 

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Just checked - it seems the official Dry Weight is 492 pounds.

That's lighter than I remembered. Makes it a hundred pounds heavier than the Wee.

No matter...I found another thing about BMW ownership. Superior engineering, which it undeniably displayed, is not the same as engineering for durability. Or for low cost of service. ROUTINE servicing was often four figures.

Should have learned to do that yourself, yeah, I get it. But I was in a chaotic situation...still am, with this economy roiling. Had to move region to region to find work for eight years now. That means apartment houses; which means I won't be taking a weekend in the garage learning how to synchronize throttle-bodies and set valves.

That means $XXXX for scheduled maintenance.

I also learned that not all BMW dealers know how to do this. Not the dealer I bought it from. Not the big-city dealer I later depended on to do the first scheduled major service. That trip to Texas, took me to where the valves had to be set, along with an oil change...and other issues...and when I got it back, it was like a different machine. FAR smoother than it was on delivery.

I asked the service manager what he did. Set the throttle-bodies, he told me.

How come two other dealers couldn't do it right, including the dealer who sold it?

"We sent our techs to school to learn this. In Germany." Okay, great. This is something I'm going to try to do in my apartment-house carport with a Haynes manual, something that the only dealer I found who was worth a [email protected], sends their people out of the COUNTRY to learn?

I sold it shortly after. Depreciation on that thing was very, very low...sold it for $2000 less than I paid for it; and I'd put 20,000 miles on it.
 

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Have you thought about teaching her to ride her own?

That's a good way to ask for a divorce. I teach the safety course and I'd sign the other half up for lessons taught by a fellow instructor before taking on the task myself. Just like I've taught a few fellow instructor's spouses.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
...

I guess it depends on how often the wife likes to ride along. If she's with you all the time, it's a good choice. If not...you may want a smaller machine for solo trips.

Have you thought about teaching her to ride her own?
Since we started riding together I haven't ridden without her. I am considering a smaller, MUCH smaller, bike for poking around myself. Vehicle registration where I live varies depending on engine displacement. While the 650s are the best value, they're not the cheapest class, that goes to the sub 250cc bikes. A little 200-230cc trail bike might end up in my shed next to the RT.

I did try to get her to get her permit and learn to ride, but she won't be in it. She enjoys relaxing on the back, plus she openly admits she wouldn't keep her license very long as she has a heavy wrist and would likely push too hard.

I need the cash from the sale to help pay for the bigger bike, plus I'm carrying too many vehicle registrations (non-trivial annual expense) as it is. With a heavy heart, she has to go. :crying2:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Made out of money, are you?
Me? Frell no!
I do all my own servicing to save on expenses as well as to be more a part of the rider-machine combination. I don't believe anybody can be a really good rider if they have no appreciation for what's going on between their knees. :fineprint:
 

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Just checked - it seems the official Dry Weight is 492 pounds.

That's lighter than I remembered. Makes it a hundred pounds heavier than the Wee.

No matter...I found another thing about BMW ownership. Superior engineering, which it undeniably displayed, is not the same as engineering for durability. Or for low cost of service. ROUTINE servicing was often four figures.

Should have learned to do that yourself, yeah, I get it. But I was in a chaotic situation...still am, with this economy roiling. Had to move region to region to find work for eight years now. That means apartment houses; which means I won't be taking a weekend in the garage learning how to synchronize throttle-bodies and set valves.

That means $XXXX for scheduled maintenance.

I also learned that not all BMW dealers know how to do this. Not the dealer I bought it from. Not the big-city dealer I later depended on to do the first scheduled major service. That trip to Texas, took me to where the valves had to be set, along with an oil change...and other issues...and when I got it back, it was like a different machine. FAR smoother than it was on delivery.

I asked the service manager what he did. Set the throttle-bodies, he told me.

How come two other dealers couldn't do it right, including the dealer who sold it?

"We sent our techs to school to learn this. In Germany." Okay, great. This is something I'm going to try to do in my apartment-house carport with a Haynes manual, something that the only dealer I found who was worth a [email protected], sends their people out of the COUNTRY to learn?

I sold it shortly after. Depreciation on that thing was very, very low...sold it for $2000 less than I paid for it; and I'd put 20,000 miles on it.
This is a tough post for me to not comment on. First, an 2009 r1200gs is about 50 pounds heavier than a DL650. Not 100lbs heavier.

Second, four figure cost for routine service? You got [email protected]%ked because of your own ignorance. The BMW's routine maintenance is way easier than routine maintenance on a DL650. I'll assume the four figure routine maintenance cost included a valve adjust and throttle body sync. So what was the equivalent service cost on the DL650?

Learning to work on a GS doesn't require german schooling. The valve covers come off with four bolts and the valve adjust is a set screw on a rocker arm. 20 minutes total for both sides and 15 additional minutes to sync the throttle bodies. Really.

I'm sorry about your current life situation,

Talk about a smoke and mirror post. This is called spreading forum bulsh!t. Geez, learn basic mechanic skills and stop taking it up the $ss.
 

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This is a tough post for me to not comment on. First, an 2009 r1200gs is about 50 pounds heavier than a DL650. Not 100lbs heavier.

Second, four figure cost for routine service? You got [email protected]%ked because of your own ignorance. The BMW's routine maintenance is way easier than routine maintenance on a DL650. I'll assume the four figure routine maintenance cost included a valve adjust and throttle body sync. So what was the equivalent service cost on the DL650?

Learning to work on a GS doesn't require german schooling. The valve covers come off with four bolts and the valve adjust is a set screw on a rocker arm. 20 minutes total for both sides and 15 additional minutes to sync the throttle bodies. Really.

I'm sorry about your current life situation,

Talk about a smoke and mirror post. This is called spreading forum bulsh!t. Geez, learn basic mechanic skills and stop taking it up the $ss.
Likewise, it's tough for me not to flame back at this. :furious:

You can say I'm an idiot for not knowing how to set the valves, throttle-bodies, and whatever else the service schedule called for. You'd be wrong but I can't prove it. I might also say that the REASON I was in Texas to do it, was that work called me down there. I'm not known to travel light; but I draw the line at packing a complete tool kit on the road.

You can say I'm an idiot for not knowing how to do it. That's kewel. But the BMW dealer I BOUGHT it from, didn't apparently know how to set it up, either. Nor the BMW dealer I later had regular warranty and scheduled service from. The selling dealer was a small one in semi-rural Wisconsin, north of Milwaukee. But the other dealer was in a busy area of Minneapolis.

Obviously, valves, throttle-body settings, and whatever other variables were working together to give the thing a buzz I didn't think a boxer engine could give. Equally obvious, they guys in Plano, Texas knew just what was wrong and set it right. For what they charged, they should have.

Nor was I going to argue or simply not-have-the-work done because I didn't like the price. And had I done that, and gone back to my local dealer, by that time in Outhouse Falls, Michigan...they probably wouldn't have set it right either. I wouldn't have known the engine would run smoother and was out of specs.

As for the weight question, I don't know why the figures you're getting are different. Are you comparing a 650 Adventure with all the farkles against a naked GS? I had the one and presently have the other. My impression of it is that while the Wee is heavy for a 650 it was nothing like the top-heavy, hard-to-saddle-up, frightful-to-imagine-dropping GS.
 

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I need the cash from the sale to help pay for the bigger bike, plus I'm carrying too many vehicle registrations (non-trivial annual expense) as it is. With a heavy heart, she has to go. :crying2:
Ah. Sometimes I forget how good things are here in the northern quadrant of God's Country...that is, Montana.

Motorcycle registration is what's called "Permanent." Pay it once and it's good for as long as you own the machine. Cars over ten years old have that option, also - although it's a bit spendy for a four-wheel vehicle as opposed to just renewing every year.

But motorcycles are only done this way. Moreover, motorcycles in this state are not required to be covered by insurance. Now only a compleat imbecile would ride with no insurance; but if you have a machine you're not riding now but don't want to sell...just park it in the back of the garage and leave it hibernate. Costs nothing, over and above depreciation.

Just two states away, California, they are so anal about registration you don't have the option even of letting the tags lapse. When you later renew, or you sell the machine to someone, you or someone has to pay all the years you've skipped before title can be transferred.

Since a lot of Californians are fleeing to Montana, and bringing their views of the world with them...we'll probably not see rational motor-vehicle registration policies last long. But for now, it's all good.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Spokes, since you're newish here you probably haven't worked out that this is a peaceable place where flaming others is actively discouraged. If that's how you want to behave kindly take it out of this thread, and preferably off this forum.
 
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This is a tough post for me to not comment on. First, an 2009 r1200gs is about 50 pounds heavier than a DL650. Not 100lbs heavier.

Mfg specs for wet weight:
1200GS - 564 lbs.
DL650 - 485 lbs.

Comparing a 1200 to a 650 for weight only isn't the best way to make a point, kind of like apples and oranges.

The RT however, is a much different bike than the 650 and each of us has our own preferences for what we ride and how we ride.

'Suum Cuique' or as Martin Lawrence says, "To each his own. You like what you like. If you want someone who's big-boned and you like that, ain't nothing wrong with having a little extra meat on there. If you like them thin-boned, then that's okay, too."

Let's be civil about this, eh.
 
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