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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a rough idea but I'd like a few other opinions. I was riding today with my Gerbing jacket and my voltage ( at about 5500 rpm ) is about 12.8 to 13.3 as I ride. When I hooked up my heated gloves the voltage would drop to 12.7 to a low of 12.1 while riding, of course at idle it would be 10.2. My question is: what voltage do I need to run all day without discharging the battery? I am thinking since the battery is normally 12.5 to 12.7, anything lower would be bad. Do you all agree? BTW, I have my low beams ( both ) on while I ride. Maybe I need to disconnect one of them. Thanks.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Battery maintenance is at about 12.6-12.8V. Below that is a discharge state. I'll switch off a headlight to keep the voltage up.
 

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Battery maintenance is at about 12.6-12.8V. Below that is a discharge state. I'll switch off a headlight to keep the voltage up.
Remember - this is the voltage AT THE BATTERY. It is well known that the stock wiring-harness on the Wee is marginal in that it may have significant voltage-drop across some of the longer conductors.

Is your voltage-measuring device connected DIRECTLY across the battery-terminals without 'sharing' any current-carrying conductors? (which -of course- would have a voltage-drop.)

Being formally trained in electronics - I consider 'significant' to be anything over 300mV.

There are several ways to design or 'spec' an electric circuit.... To be safe from fire - one must use conductors large enough to not melt the insulation of the wires. However, in a low-voltage application where every millivolt counts, it may be better to use larger-diameter wires than the minimum so the voltage-drop is less than 50mV under full current load.

EasternBever offers some 'kits' which double-up the ground conductors hence cuts in half the voltage-drop.
 

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I noticed the same thing on my Wee. Sometimes cycling the jacket, heated grips power off and on will let the charging system recover and output the 14 volts.
I use the voltage reading on an old Garmin. It lets me know 'zackaly what voltage is on the battery.
What Bruce said about grounds and power loss is good. Connections on bikes can be questionable so ensuring a solid connection will make the most of the 12 volts available.
Floating grounds will drive you crazy!
 

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I have a pwm motor controller which provides continous voltage and load

rather than on off it will draw the current it needs continously but you are in control. I only needed full power at 26 F
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I just decided it's time for me to install a switch to turn one headlight off. Is there a favorite way of doing this ( switch type and location, etc. ). I did a search in the maint. section of this forum with no luck. I can figure out how to do it, would just like to know how others did it.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Since I ride with low beams in daylight and only ride with a headlight off in daylight, I opened up the low beam hot wire to one headlight, a black wire with a blue stripe, and set a handlebar switch to close the opened gap.
 

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Is there a favorite way of doing this ( switch type and location, etc. ). I did a search in the maint. section of this forum with no luck. I can figure out how to do it, would just like to know how others did it.
I used Eastern Beaver's Hi Beam cutout switch. Install was simple simple. See: Suzuki VStrom Electrics
 

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I also installed an Eastern Beaver headlight cut out switch, for same reasons as above. Gerbings jacket linner, GPS, Radar detector, heated grips and occasional CB radio. Simple and clean install for elctrically challanged person such as I. When I installed it, no little grey electrons were seen escaping from anywhere.
 

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Ok, so please help me clarify a very simple concept.

On my K6 Wee both lamps are used for both HI and LO beams.

If I use the EB H4 Headlight Cut Adapter - Cuts both beams on one headlight- or wire in a switch like Greywolf did, the beams of one of my lamps is off all the time until I "switch it" back into play, then it "plays" as normal. I understand how this works and can see, and I assume, I would save approx. 55 watts/4.5 amps b/c a particular lamp is out of the system.

If I utilize EB's H4 Lo or Hi Beam Cut Adapters, am I correct in thinking that I will only save the aforementioned watts/amps when my OEM HI/LO switch is switched on LO, and thus, when I switch the OEM HI/LO switch to HI all lamps are back in play? If I used this add-on I don't believe it would matter which lamp I connected it to, right?

Yes, simple concept, just making sure I understand before I start cutting wires or spending money.

Thanks much!
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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There is no need to cut both beams on one headlight. That would take a DPST switch to cut both hot leads. No, cutting the ground lead doesn't work. The electrons find B/W ground through the filaments. The diagram shows the flow with the ground lead opened and low beam selected for example.



Just use the switch to cut the beam you use when daylight riding, B/Bl for low or Y for high. Cut out the low beam and selecting high beam will turn bot lights on high.

If you don't have a headlight relay kit, I would get one to head off future problems. They are available with cut outs pre wired if you want at Suzuki VStrom Electrics if you scroll down, including a DPST option to cut out both beams on one light.
 

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Thanks for the info Greywolf.

A couple follow-up questions.

Cutting both beams does seem a bit like overkill, but noticed that was an optional wiring set-up through EB.

So, if I am understanding you correctly, i.e. what you did with your B/Bl wire, you simply cut (interrupted the circuit) the B/Bl wire and inserted a toggle ...assuming a typical 3 blade toggle?

Is that correct?

I just installed the H4 relay kit, though quite frankly am a bit new to wiring and wiring schemes and didn't really put 2 and 2 together to order the H4 relay kit with the cut-out option. So, I could either order the EB add on or "toggle" into the B/Bl wire as you have described. Where is that particular wire?

Thanks!
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I cut the B/Bl wire coming from the headlight three wire connector and extended the resultant ends to a handlebar switch. A simple on/off or SPST switch has two connectors, not three. You want a switch that can handle 5A.
 

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I have a rough idea but I'd like a few other opinions. I was riding today with my Gerbing jacket and my voltage ( at about 5500 rpm ) is about 12.8 to 13.3 as I ride. When I hooked up my heated gloves the voltage would drop to 12.7 to a low of 12.1 while riding, of course at idle it would be 10.2. My question is: what voltage do I need to run all day without discharging the battery? I am thinking since the battery is normally 12.5 to 12.7, anything lower would be bad. Do you all agree? BTW, I have my low beams ( both ) on while I ride. Maybe I need to disconnect one of them. Thanks.
You voltage readings seems way low to me. I tested my new 2011 wee the other day with my heated jacket liner and heated gloves and even at idle with both turned on I was able to keep in the 12.8-13.2 area. 10.2v at idle just does not seem right on your machine ? I have the Gerbring gear like you and one of the thermostat controllers. I think you have a problem in your machine
 

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^^^^^^ I agree

Mystic cabalist says moving magnets on rotor

Is this a Zombie thread

Note: K6 with Gerbing Jacket, signal dynamics still green even at idle
 

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I have been following similar threads for some years now and I must comment/ ask. (I have a heated vest, and heated grips that I haven't wire up yet. I'm a pracra).
1. I also had the idea to cut the ground to one headlight (I think that's a song) but was straightened out by GW's diagram of the unexpected flow of electrons through the bulb filaments. Seems to me the judicious use of a diode or two would allow the use of the ground-cutout switch. Perhaps some EE-type could provide guidance here.
2. The EB headlight relay kit makes the lights brighter by lowering the resistance to the headlight thereby increasing the current from the battery, thereby using more power and reducing the watts available for heated gear, no?
3. Which headlight is preferred to cutout, assuming night-riding?
4. If I understand the stator/metallic oxide semiconducttor field effect transistor threads correctly, it's best to use the available watts without cutting a headlight as long as you don't exceed the available watts, no? (Acronyms are my friends.)
5. Harking back to #1, if I ever install my HID headlights that are on my garage floor I can cut the ground to one since there are no filaments to provide the funky -e path, right?
That's all.
Keith
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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1. I also had the idea to cut the ground to one headlight (I think that's a song) but was straightened out by GW's diagram of the unexpected flow of electrons through the bulb filaments. Seems to me the judicious use of a diode or two would allow the use of the ground-cutout switch. Perhaps some EE-type could provide guidance here.
It would have to be a big diode and it would only cut out the other light. The unselected beam on the powered light can't be cut out with a diode. A DPST switch would be easier and not be a power robber.

2. The EB headlight relay kit makes the lights brighter by lowering the resistance to the headlight thereby increasing the current from the battery, thereby using more power and reducing the watts available for heated gear, no?
No. The relay allows more power to the lights by eliminating the power loss to heat in the stock wiring and connections. The power available for heated gear is unchanged.

3. Which headlight is preferred to cutout, assuming night-riding?
I would not ride at night with one headlight except in an emergency. Then, I would want the right one to see the shoulder and road edge.[/quote]

4. If I understand the stator/metallic oxide semiconducttor field effect transistor threads correctly, it's best to use the available watts without cutting a headlight as long as you don't exceed the available watts, no? (Acronyms are my friends.)
True.

5. Harking back to #1, if I ever install my HID headlights that are on my garage floor I can cut the ground to one since there are no filaments to provide the funky -e path, right?
HID lights use the same power wire for both high and low beams and another wire to power the solenoid that changes between high and low. Just switch the power wire from the relay to the ballast on the left side lamp.
 

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Originally Posted by KOG:
The EB headlight relay kit makes the lights brighter by lowering the resistance to the headlight thereby increasing the current from the battery, thereby using more power and reducing the watts available for heated gear, no?

GW Reply:
No. The relay allows more power to the lights by eliminating the power loss to heat in the stock wiring and connections. The power available for heated gear is unchanged.


Splain me Lucy:
Consider a simple circuit consisting of a battery, a bulb, and some wire. The bulb and the wire are both resistive loads, and the sum of their resistances along with the voltage determines the current through the cicuit, I=V/R. If I lower the resistance of the wire more current flows through the cicuit. More current (I) X the same voltage (V) = more power used (P). What am I missing?
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The voltage isn't the same. Without the resistance of the stock wiring system, relays can deliver a full volt more to the headlights.
 
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