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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm surprised at the concern some here have shown about odometer readings on the Wee. Some have wondered about buying a bike with fewer than 10,000 miles. I notice someone remarked that his dealer won't put a bike on the floor if it has more than 8,000 miles. It's particularly interesting to me in view of the recent threads comparing BMWs to Stroms. 35-40,000 miles on a Beemer a few years old won't scare anybody away, and many sell with 75,000 or more. I bought my 09 Wee with 11,0000 miles and didn't think a thing about it. I wouldn't hesitate to run up ten times that mileage if I keep it long enough.
 

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High milage varies to the area you live. Florida has typically high milage bikes cause you ride year round. Up north some people frown at 20K cause we have 9 months of winter and 3 months of road repairs. Some just ride year round and never look at the odometer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
High milage varies to the area you live. Florida has typically high milage bikes cause you ride year round. Up north some people frown at 20K cause we have 9 months of winter and 3 months of road repairs. Some just ride year round and never look at the odometer.
Thanks for the reply. Ironically, I only ride in the winter in Florida. It's too hot for me here the rest of the year.



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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My overall point is that I don't see why a properly maintained Wee engine and tranny wouldn't be good for at least 100,000 miles with no problem. But potential Wee buyers seem worried about bikes with fewer than 10,000 miles on them. I just don't understand.
 

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I don't think it has to do with a concern over Strom engineering or the perceived longevity of the bike. Instead, my guess is that it has to do with the desire to be on a status symbol, namely any BMW. People want them, but can't necessarily afford them when they are new, and especially when you compare them to other brand alternatives. So, they are more willing to buy a used one for less to be part of an exclusive group that confers the notion of being well-to-do. The Stroms confer no such status.

I am always amazed to see a nice looking BMW or Mercedes car being driven down the road with a temporary tag on the back showing the car to be made in the late 80s or early 90s and it's being driven by someone who looks like they may have just graduated from college. All they care about is image and that they got the car for what they think is a reasonable price. Of course, when the car needs repairs that they can't afford, it typically starts to fall apart in a big hurry.
 

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Have just removed the logos and Suzuki ID stickies from the Wee. Think it would be interesting to slap on a couple of BMW "blue and whites" and keep track of the number of people that would comment on "what a cool looking beemer" it was. Labels do impress people. Lots of those people would not even look at it if they knew it was a Suzuki.
 

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Have just removed the logos and Suzuki ID stickies from the Wee. Think it would be interesting to slap on a couple of BMW "blue and whites" and keep track of the number of people that would comment on "what a cool looking beemer" it was. Labels do impress people. Lots of those people would not even look at it if they knew it was a Suzuki.
I know a Guy with a KLR 650, it has what looks like BMW logos on it but they actually say KMW... gets lots of "Nice Beemer" comments....
 

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Have just removed the logos and Suzuki ID stickies from the Wee. Think it would be interesting to slap on a couple of BMW "blue and whites" and keep track of the number of people that would comment on "what a cool looking beemer" it was. Labels do impress people. Lots of those people would not even look at it if they knew it was a Suzuki.
I actually prefer the obvious Suzuki look over a Strom with BMW logos on it. If nothing else, the obvious Suzuki is much less of a target for those who might feel the need to unlawfully borrow a motorcycle. :thumbup:
 

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Well here is a twist on the theme. I was at a gas station just last week filling the bike when a Mercedes Benz SUV (GLK 350) rolls up next to me. Out gets a woman maybe in her late 30's dressed well. After starting to pump gas she walks round the pump and compliments me on the bike :thumbup: Turns out she had an SV650 but sold it last year. A decision she has regretted ever since. We chatted for about 5mins talking bike stuff. She totally did not look the type at all yet she was knowledgeable and complimentary.
 

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My overall point is that I don't see why a properly maintained Wee engine and tranny wouldn't be good for at least 100,000 miles with no problem. But potential Wee buyers seem worried about bikes with fewer than 10,000 miles on them. I just don't understand.
It's because inexperienced riders believe that 6,000 miles is a lot on a bike (possibly because most people keep a bike as a toy and buy a new one rather than adjust their valves).

Experienced riders don't care about mileage, since they probably have a daily ridden BMW in the garage with over 200,000kms on the clock.
 

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I am

Pushing 80K miles on my bike now with nothing more done to it other than filters and oil changes. The only issue I did have was with the throttle bodies but that was a freak incident.

Best damn bike i ever owned, just spend the last 8 days on it riding up and down the west coast for 3500 miles. 10+ hours a day in the saddle never a problem.

Looking for my next motor to put in the bike when this one goes (if it goes).
 

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I bought a K6 DL650 and loved the first two days, then had 6 weeks of buyer remorse before going full circle and falling back in love.
The bike had 13,000 miles and ran fine for two days, then I ran afoul of the "blown all over the road" and the "bad throttle sensor when hot" problem. I instantly figured out why the former owner dumped this machine.
The StromTrooper forums saved me. After reading some items in the maintenance section and getting good counsel from members here, I swapped out the throttle position sensor, and lowered the front forks 10 mm. Wow, what a change. It is no longer so sensitive to the winds and it is stone good reliable, rather than leaving me with no idle after a short hard run on the freeway.
Love it now!! Adding more farkles weekly.
 

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i reciently sold a speedmaster. it was 5 years old with 3k miles on it. after rejetting and running alot of sea foam through it i could never get the mpg over 38. i figured it was because it sat for long periods with the carbs full of aging gas. my wee had 9300 miles on it when i got it and consistently gives 57mpg. for my money a well maintained high mileage bike is better than a low mileage that was not properly maintained.
most bikes die from neglect (left out side in the weather) than mileage.
 

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Theres a bike rental firm in Christchurch, New Zealand who hire out vstroms for tours round the country. I've seen bikes of theirs with 130,000km + on the clock and still running fine. I guess the miles are mainly done hot, reasonably fast and the bikes are serviced regularly which all helps.

With todays modern oils and technology it should be almost impossible to wear an engine out. I'm still trying to wear the my BMW out which still runs as well as it did 120,000km and 27years ago and expect the vstom to clock up a similar mileage without a problem.

Happy riding.
C
 

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I am always amazed to see a nice looking BMW or Mercedes car being driven down the road with a temporary tag on the back showing the car to be made in the late 80s or early 90s and it's being driven by someone who looks like they may have just graduated from college. All they care about is image and that they got the car for what they think is a reasonable price. Of course, when the car needs repairs that they can't afford, it typically starts to fall apart in a big hurry.
Although that's very often the case, never assume... When I was a college student about 10 years ago, I had a Mercedes and a BMW (at different times). They were the cheapest cars to keep running I've ever owned--parts interchangeability was amazing, especially considering all the fuel system parts that came off Volvos to go on that BMW. If I were paying a mechanic and buying dealer parts, I still couldn't afford to own either of those cars, but doing my own work and buying OEM parts online or pulling them off wrecked cars I drove a BMW that was far more fun to drive for way less money than my friends' Fords cost them. It wasn't for status (not much status conferred by a 25-year-old car with 220k miles), it was because I liked the car.

It's because inexperienced riders believe that 6,000 miles is a lot on a bike (possibly because most people keep a bike as a toy and buy a new one rather than adjust their valves).
:rofl: I love showing the Harley and sportbike guys the 83k on my Wee's odometer. Just like BMWs, high-mileage V-Stroms aren't rare--I think people tend to buy them because they love to ride, not because they want a toy. My Wee is my "car" most of the time, as it was for the guy I bought it from.

I personally don't like buying low-mileage bikes. A 10-year-old bike with 8k miles on it probably wasn't important to its owner and may or may not have had its maintenance done. A 10-year-old bike with 80k, however, was clearly an important part of its owner's life and chances are he took care of it. Adjust your mileage for your climate, but for transportation-type bikes (V-Stroms, BMWs, ST1300s, etc) low mileage makes me worry.
 
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