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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone tried the Karoo Street? Just came out this year and tempted by marketing. I ride about 85% to 90% Road. Any feedback is appreciated.
 

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So to buck the logic of buying a “90/10” tire for someone who rides on road 90% of the time, I ride on road ~95% of of the time.
9500 of 10,000 Miles is probably on road. I’d like to say differently, because I rarely pass a dirt road without going down it, but most of my time is commuting or riding hundreds of miles on road to ride 10s of mile off. In that situation, I find myself happy with a 90/10 tire 100% of the time on road, and unhappy with a 90/10 tire 100% of the time off road. Since riding off road - gravel roads, rocky roads, mountain roads are why I bought the bike, and what brings me a LOT of joy, anything less than a 50/50 tire is a non starter with me.

In contrast, a 50/50 tire (such as Mitas E07, Karoo 3, heidenau k60) leaves me happy on road >95% (100% if I stay below 90mph), and 100% satisfied off road.

Others will have useful points of view, but I’ll never go back to an 80/20, 90/10 or some other such tire if I think there is the remotest chance I’ll ride on gravel, sandy, rocky or muddy roads.

YMMV
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks very much. Seems like sage wisdom and a contradiction from what others (sales folk) are saying to me. You’ve giving me much to ponder. So 50:50 tires will last, allow aggressive turning, and handle safely in rain on the pavement? What about noise? Thanks again
 

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I am just the opposite of kd70qc. I use Anakee III tires and also explore the occasional dirt/gravel road. I want my road miles to be smooth and quiet and my tires to last a reasonable amount of time. I will compromise in the dirt and seldom ride any mud.

I do the same with my 4Runner. I used to live with the shitty ride of aggressive tires when I seldom used it off-road. I now use a more all-terrain tire.

In the end it is up to you and tires wear out within a season anyway so the commitment is short.
 

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With my E07’s I can drag a peg on dry roads, and do occasionally. On wet, I don’t push my luck. If you’ve ridden sport bikes at the limits in the wet you have WAY more experience than me, but I am very comfortable touring (like last year on twisties in the Ozarks in an all day down pour) and commuting on the Mitas.

I’ve read complaints about the k60’s in the wet but don’t know first hand.

Regarding durability my E07’s have over 10k miles on them and I’m not going to replace until my next cross country trip. There is a tire thread on this site and on ADVRider where the E07s are discussed with one guy getting 20k miles. I wouldn’t do it, they looked shot to me, but he did an Alaska Trip and then some.

Regarding noise, they are louder. They don’t howl like 4x4 mud tires, but they hum. They have never bothered me. The wind noise is louder than the tire hum the majority of the time.

BTW, I’m in North central Alabama, ~100 mi south of Nashville, if you want to ride sometime, or if you want to ride my bike with the tires some time before you buy a set.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the additional info. I need to get some tires soon, so will have to make a decision before any test ride, but thanks for offer. Let’s stay in touch on a possible ride. I am new to the sport and just day tripping right now but would like to venture out at some point. I live near Murfreesboro and Sloans is doing a ride in south middle TN real soon. You might check their web site. I plan to take one of their trips when the timing works out. Safe riding and thanks for the tire info.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for feedback. Looking at YouTube reviews, some are claiming the Anakee 2 was better, but hard to find. My local dealer highly recommends the Anakee 3 like you and says it is good on trails, but that tread looks like a sport bike’s to me. I guess it is in the details of those grooves where the grip happens. There are so many choices I may just give up and replace with OEM Trailwings.
 

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Do you change your own tires? How tough it the offroad do you do? How far do have to go to get to dirt? Have you shot a glance at the Motor Tractinator GPS I just ordered a set. Hoping they are what everyone says they are.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I don’t change my own tires. Does that matter for selection? I don’t do heavy off roading, but when I do get off road, I don’t like sliding all over, which is what my worn out trail wings do now. Never heard of those Tractinators, but just checked them out on web. Look a little like the TKC70 I think. How did you discover them? Thanks for info.
 

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Well expense if you changed your own tires treah life isn't as big a deal and I would point you in the shinko 804/805 direction as they are great 50/50 tires.As for the Motoz's I saw them in a YouTube video originally, then in several forums and read written reviews. Haven't heard a single bad review yet and most say they are excellent on road. My set should be here next week might be a few weeks before I mount them since I don't need them just yet as I run Darkside during the winter. Also make sure your looking at the GPS model they multiple tractionators and the GPS line has reversible tread design one direction is 50/50 the other is more off road.
 

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I'm currently on Avon TrekRiders and they have a chevron-type tread pattern like the new Metzler Karoo-Street. I felt a big upgrade with the TrekRider on gravel / dirt / limited mud riding. These grip pretty good on the macadam too.

I have purchased a set of the old reliable Metzler Tourance (f/r) to have in reserve for an early summer change out.

My only negative with the TrekRider chevron tread pattern is that I feel / hear the buzz from the front tire but that is the nature of the beast. No one tire is going to do everything well.

Try the Karoo-Street and report back. I'd like to know. One thing about motorcycle tires, they don't last too long, so you aren't stuck forever with them.
 

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Would you buy your tyres from a Russian Chinese company?

Has anyone tried the Karoo Street? Just came out this year and tempted by marketing. I ride about 85% to 90% Road. Any feedback is appreciated.
I have lost my faith in Pirelli Metzeler since its Chinese takeover.

According to several paper reports and news agencies.

ChemChina last year carried out its acquisition of Pirelli who own Metzeler. It has completed its mission and now owns, directly or indirectly, all of Pirelli's ordinary shares and more than 93.2 percent of the Italian tyre maker's savings shares. It also has acquired 14.16 in the Russian oil giant Rosneft
Pirelli has been making tyres in China since 2005.
 

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Wow, I didn't know the chinese had bought out Pirelli.
I recently put on a set of Pirelli Night Dragons (100% street) on my strom.
I love the tires, I just hope the quality control remains high.
 

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That's kinda funny as I've seen a huge difference in the way Pirelli tires that we use on SUVs are wearing and lasting in a positive way. The new Scorpion Verde are leaps and bounds better than the last version of the scorpion line we had.
 

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There were a lot of reports last year of Chinese made Metzeler's not fitting properly, that may have been addressed though. My concern is giving my money to a country that is by stealth, taking over the world. First cheap labour, putting out our businesses, then takeovers of what remains. Then when they have monopoly putting up prices! The companies that open up plants in China have very restrictive operating terms, not being allowed to take much of the profits out of the country and terms of labour. Quality control is a big issue, my friends company, said they have to keep a constant check on quality otherwise it will drop off rapidly!

However on another note this is a review of the Michelin Anakee Wild 50/50 tyre that may be of interest, care of Bennetts Insurance.
For the recent trip to IcelandI fitted a set of Michelin Anakee Wilds. These are the company's more dirt-focussed tyres officially a 50/50 split between on road and off road use to take on the likes of the Continental TKC 80. The Wilds were designed specifically with the large capacity adventure bike in mind such as the R1200 GS I would be riding in Iceland – with it being Michelin's first block-tread tyre to feature radial construction. The radial design is claimed to offer greater longevity; a common sticking point for this style of tyre on this type of bike.
This was to be the second time I’d used Anakee Wilds, and chose them for Iceland for the fact that I would need something that could do the 1000 miles of motorway riding to get there and back at either end, plus be able to tackle the dirt and gravel trails of the island's interior routes. Basically, I needed a tyre that could do everything, and hopefully have enough life in it do the complete trip of an anticipated 5500 to 6000 miles, which was about the distance I got out of the first set I tried.
With anything like this there is going to be a compromise. On the road the Anakee Wilds are quite noisy, mainly from the front tyre, which can take some getting used to and is best cancelled out with ear plugs. They also have a tendency to wander and generate a small weave at fast motorway speeds, but only for the first 200 miles or so. After that they settle down and are happy to push into triple figures without any such misbehaviour. In terms of cornering, a tyre like this is never going to feel as natural at the turn in as a regular tyre. Someone jumping straight on a bike fitted with something like an Anakee would probably think there was something off with the bike, but they just take some getting used to because you can push on almost as hard as you might with a regular tyre, though you do lose a little bit of feel.
It's off road though where I've been especially impressed with the Wilds, and one of the main reasons as well as longevity that I fitted them again for this trip. On a big heavy bike like this the biggest issue is the front end washing away on off-cambered dirt surfaces and mud. And once the bike's sliding away from you it's very hard to catch. The Anakees are good because they offer the most front-end lateral bite of any tyre I've tested on the GS. It means you can push on that bit harder or at least ride with greater confidence that the front isn't going to wash. These big bikes do still take some practice and technique to get them to ride well in the dirt, which is why proper off-road training is just as important as the right tyre, but riding solo on the remote trails of Iceland I wanted as much traction as I could get.
What I also like about the Wilds is that they've been designed to run off-road at standard road pressures, rather than being required to reduce pressures for traction in the dirt. I run mine at 2.4 bar at the front and 2.9 bar at the rear, on or off-road. This is handy for the constant transition between different road surfaces when riding Iceland's rougher routes and also, with pressures kept high, helps avoids damaged rims and punctures, which can happen with deflated tyres.
In terms of longevity, I had hoped they'd last the entire trip, and from past experience they might just about have made it, but with the added weight of the luggage, the long periods at motorway speeds to get to Iceland, plus the aggressive road surfaces and volcanic gravel of the island's F roads, I did suffer premature wear. At 3,600 miles, while in Reykjavik and with 2000 miles until reaching home, it was sensible to have a new rear fitted; the front had plenty left in it. They may have made it back to England, but the risk of riding back through mainland Europe with a bald rear tyre was probably sensibly avoided. A shop in the city had one in stock, though did manage to fit it backwards and take a big gouge out of the rim. Not great.
Despite the wear caused by the volcanic rock, the tyre was perfect for Iceland. I'm glad I had the Wilds on for tackling the F roads when two-up with my wife on the back the extra reassurance of front grip was essential. If I was planning another trip to Iceland and freighting the bike in rather than riding up to Denmark to catch the ferry then I would certainly fit another set of these Wilds. If I was doing another trip two-up with the wife then I'd possibly consider fitting a regular semi-trail tyre such as a regular Anakee III, just to avoid the inconvenience of having to change the tyre mid-trip. They would also manage the gravel roads just fine.
If I was doing the exact same trip again then I might look at something like a Heidenau K60, as they would last the entire the distance, but the trade-off would be diminished off-road grip, and that's not something I'd be keen to sacrifice. As always with a dual-sport tyre, it's a compromise, but for anyone looking for maximum off-road traction for their large capacity adventure bike, mated with excellent wear rates and decent on road performance, then it's hard to look past the Anakee Wilds.

Michelin Anakee Wild sizes available:
170/60 R17 72R
150/70 R17 69R
130/80 R17 65R
140/80 R17 69R
130/80 R18 66S
140/80 R18 70R
120/70 R19 60R
110/80 R19 59R
90/90 R21 54R
 

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Thanks for feedback. Looking at YouTube reviews, some are claiming the Anakee 2 was better, but hard to find. My local dealer highly recommends the Anakee 3 like you and says it is good on trails, but that tread looks like a sport bike’s to me. I guess it is in the details of those grooves where the grip happens. There are so many choices I may just give up and replace with OEM Trailwings.
Please no. Choose ANYTHING but those awful Trailwings.
Do they track along grooves in the seal? Do they try to change direction on undulating surfaces? Do they step sideways in gravel and make the bars wiggle? Yep, they're OEM Trailwings.

90% of my mileage would probably be on seal but I use Mitas E-07's as when I am riding gravel or dirt I want a tire that is secure and predictable. They are almost as good as a 90/10 on seal and last as long - so why not?
Enjoy exploring down those unsealed backroads without having to control those wiggling handlebars.
 

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Good info. Who is not making their tires in China now?
Yes the rest may not be owned "yet" by China, but they sure do take advantage of the cheap labour, but we see little of the savings.
"Yinhe Group part of China National Chemical Corp's (ChemChina) proposed €7.1 billion (HK$59.7 billion) takeover offer for Italy's Pirelli, the world's fifth-largest tyre maker. Chinese state-owned enterprise ChemChina. The company is one of the largest tyre manufacturers behind Bridgestone, Michelin, Continental and Goodyear."
There goes another one.
 

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I have a set of Metzler Tourance Next waiting to be installed, says made in Germany on the side, dated 35/16 and 15/17. Does anyone have any information on which tires are made in china and which in Germany, (or other countries as the case may be.) China is not a deal breaker for me, but I am curious.
 
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