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Discussion Starter #1
Dealership is quoting me 1.5 hours for chain and sprocket replacement (front and rear sprockets and new chain), and a half-hour for front brake replacement on my Wee.

Does this sound reasonable/correct? Just wanted to get a sense of whether this is a good guesstimate... I've had pretty good experiences with them in the past, wanted a sanity check for this before going in to get the work done.
 

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That sounds perfectly reasonable.

It would take me double that time for sure - factoring in brainfarts, beer malfunctions, bathroom breaks, etc....and, front sprockets can be a bio-tch to remove sometimes (there's no real good way to hold them in position so you can get the sprocket nut off). And, factor in you probably don't have that $100 chain rivet tool that mostly everyone will tell you is best for installing a new chain properly.......

On my last bike, I purposefully bought a master link/clip type chain instead of the type that uses a one-time-only rivet to button the chain together, so I didn't have to buy an expensive chain riveting tool. People will tell you that master link equipped chains are the worst thing since North Korean bikini waxing, but my 630 (yes Virginia, it was a 630 monster chain) master link type chain lasted 15 years on my 750 Kawasaki without ever falling off (and, Vstrom 650's ain't exactly monster horsepower machines...)

That said, both procedures are very "easy" and straightforward, but like anything, there are challenges.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Doing it myself involves a very high probability of dying, so I guess $170 is well enough worth it :)

The chain seems iffy even though it's only got about 13k on it, and the brake pads may or may not ever have been replaced before (bike's got 43k on the odo). As soon as the parts come in, I'm going to just suck it up and get the job done... partly as the sprockets are a lowered gearing on my wee, from the prior owner's decision, and I'd rather go stock gearing.
 

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I like paying mechanics to work on my bike. When the bolts shear off, or the threads strip, or all those other annoying things that machines do when worked on happens, they get to fix it. For free.

2 hours for the work described seems very reasonable.
 

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That sounds reasonable. The last time I paid a shop to do my chain on my other bike (because I didn't have the rivet tool) they messed it up and didn't press on the side plate all the way and didn't make the rivets big enough. The chain didn't last very long as crud got into that area behind the o-rings and it wore out. Then when I replaced the chain I bought the rivet tool from Motion Pro and did it myself. Bought D.I.D. super street chain which was more heavy duty and had x-rings instead o-rings. Then I sold the bike to get my Vstrom. I like to do all my own wrenching but I know a lot of people don't. As long as your mechanic is good it all sounds like a good price.
 

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Just replaced my Vee's chain last night, and it took me just over an hour. There were a few extras in there -- rummaging for lost tools and whatnot.

So, yeah, 1.5 hours is reasonable -- they have to factor in the time to get the parts, put the bike on the lift, do the paperwork, etc. and so on.

The larger question is whether you trust the mechanic more than yourself -- it's your life on the line.

Around here, most motorcycle mechanic jobs are seasonal, so you tend to find stringy drifters and spotty teenagers in the service departments. Let's just say QC is historically lax...
 

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Just replaced my Vee's chain last night, and it took me just over an hour. There were a few extras in there -- rummaging for lost tools and whatnot.

So, yeah, 1.5 hours is reasonable -- they have to factor in the time to get the parts, put the bike on the lift, do the paperwork, etc. and so on.

The larger question is whether you trust the mechanic more than yourself -- it's your life on the line.

Around here, most motorcycle mechanic jobs are seasonal, so you tend to find stringy drifters and spotty teenagers in the service departments. Let's just say QC is historically lax...
I agree. The good mechanics are doing the engine and tranny work, maybe mapping EFI, and/or diagnosing things. The complicated stuff.

The new guy, who thought bike mechanic sounded better than french fry technician is relegated to routine maintenance. Filters, oil, chains, tune ups,tires, brakes. Stuff you can and IMO should do yourself. Not only to learn, but for the road repair skills you might aquire from the learning.

As for "they get to deal with stripped or sheared bolts"...maybe/maybe not. They may also hide the misstake..from you and the shop manager. Stripped spark plug...prove we did it.

Missing bolt, left over in the parts tray. In my pocket.
 
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