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Discussion Starter #1
One of the first items I installed on my Vee was a Stebel horn. At the time I recall getting to the stock horn for the relay trigger was a pain.
For the past couple months every once in a while the horn wasn't responding when needed. It seemed that when I decided to check it out, it would work flawlessly.

In preparation for any outcome I even purchased a Fiamm horn in case the Stebel had died.

Yesterday I decided to get to the bottom of it and began disassembling bodywork. I came to a point where the relay clicked but no horn. Rechecked all the wires and then begrudgingly decided to start fresh. That meant going into the horn connection behind the radiator.

I made fresh lead wires, and reinstalled everything. Still just clicking. After the better part of today spent on it I decided to change the perfectly fine looking fuse. BEEP!.

After all of that it was a hairline split in the 15 amp inline fuse. I didn't know they could be intermittent like that. It's now working fine. I'm just missing half on one of those pushpin fasteners.

I thought that only those who had ventured into Vee bodywork and that horn location could appreciate the story.
 

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Living the Stereotype
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Good for you.....just like a good Boy Scout




BEEP REPAIRED





Sorry
I've never been accused of genius, so it took a few passes for it to sink in.
 

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It is unfortunate you had to go thru all that work to isolate an intermittent fuse.

Being formally trained in electronics, I would have taken a different approach which would have isolated the problem in 4 steps.

1) Relay clicking - assume the low-current wireing to the original horn connections is OK.
2) Remove relay and jumper the high-current wires - does horn sound? (yours would NOT have)
3) Temporarrly jumper from battery+ to empty relay socket - bypassing the fuse. (your horn would have sounded)
4) Ahhh, the problem must be the fuse.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That is a logical approach. I think my extended effort was partly due to half of a preconceived thought that the Stebel horn had gone bad. I've read about Stebel failures on the Internet (so it must be true).

And the when I wriggled the wiring than ran toward the oem horn it would sometimes work.

At one point I even had the handlebar switch split. I don't recall ever having a fuse with a hairline crack like that.

Thanks for the replies. These stories don't hold any appeal or appreciation to those who never put a wrench to their own motorcycles.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The most common Stebel failure is the relay. Hearing a click doesn't mean the relay is working. It means it is throwing. Proper contact may or may not be made. A visual check of a fuse isn't enough either. Good electrical practice involves checking for power.

Fuses can fail from vibration, especially from a combination of vibration and heat. A device should be fused such that the device draw no more than 80% of the fuse rating in normal use to prevent blowing from spikes and to keep the fuse temperature down. 80% of 15A is 12A and the Stebel commonly draws 13A. I use a 20A fuse and 12ga wire although 14ga is fine. Many people use 16ga wire and 15A fuses successfully but I consider those marginal.
 

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It is unfortunate you had to go thru all that work to isolate an intermittent fuse.

Being formally trained in electronics, I would have taken a different approach which would have isolated the problem in 4 steps.

1) Relay clicking - assume the low-current wireing to the original horn connections is OK.
2) Remove relay and jumper the high-current wires - does horn sound? (yours would NOT have)
3) Temporarrly jumper from battery+ to empty relay socket - bypassing the fuse. (your horn would have sounded)
4) Ahhh, the problem must be the fuse.
You left out:

1A) Leave the garage and buy beer.

2A) Call you buddy to come over and "help."
2B) Consume beer.

3A) Decide to skip it and go riding.
3B) Get a load of crap from the SO for riding under the influence.
3C) Forget the whole thing, send your buddy home, and take a nap.
 

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+1 on greywolf's post. I had just relocated my Stebel horn using a Pat Walsh Design bracket and took great care to make it all very neat and tidy and heat shrunk all connectors.

A quick beep of the horn worked fine several times in the garage, but when using it out on the road, it suddenly died.

Found the original 10 Amp fuse had blown. Went & bought a 20 Amp and all is now good to go. I did read elsewhere on here the Stebels can pull 16 Amps, so hence adding the 25% margin and going for a 20 amp fuse.

Once you get used to having that horn at your disposal, you really, really want it to work each and every time, esp. when you need it most.

To illustrate, on the w/end here in SYD & not far from where I live, a guy and his gal on a cruiser got sideswiped and downed by a car changing lanes going in the same direction. I immediately wondered if that disaster could have been easily averted if he had a horn that would have awoken and scared the living crapola out of the sleeping cager.

Curiously, since putting mine on, (& touch wood), I have not yet had to use it to wake up any cagers who want my piece of road more than I do.

Cheers...herdygerdy 8)
 

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It is unfortunate you had to go thru all that work to isolate an intermittent fuse.

Being formally trained in electronics, I would have taken a different approach which would have isolated the problem in 4 steps.

1) Relay clicking - assume the low-current wireing to the original horn connections is OK.
2) Remove relay and jumper the high-current wires - does horn sound? (yours would NOT have)
3) Temporarrly jumper from battery+ to empty relay socket - bypassing the fuse. (your horn would have sounded)
4) Ahhh, the problem must be the fuse.
Yeah. Ive got training too. At work, troubleshooting usually goes well. And if in doubt, there are more manuals than you could read in a lifetime to help out. That being said, I sometimes screw the pooch when I'm working on my own stuff. I fixate on what I think could/should be the problem and troubleshoot/repair accordingly, which all to often leads to more work. Then after pissing myself off, I step back take a breath, drink a beer, and troubleshoot properly(I hope). I could say that I would have changed the fuse first, because that's usually the first thing I do at work(actually reset the breaker) but thats not always the case. Just be glad it turned out to be something simple. A few weeks ago when I was mowing the lawn for the first time this season the mower died. From the way it was running I figured it was a fuel issue. So ripped off the carb, cleaned and rebuilt it. Guess what, not the problem. Funny thing, if someone had said to me, mower runs like shit, I would have said "Spend $3 on a plug, then get back to me". Changed my plug, started on the first pull.:biggrinjester:
 

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If you got a beep, you must have reconnected the stock horn by mistake. Stebel sounds more like a BWRONK.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'm printing Greywolf's response. I like the simple progression. I'll be the first to admit that electrical problems are one of the areas I would like to have more knowledge of. That short response will keep me focused if / when another electrical issue comes up.

I did try three different relays during this exercise. It acted like a shorted wire and not the main lead wire where the fuse is. I am using 12 gauge wire to the from the relay to the horn, battery, and ground. The ground is on the battery not the PC8. The wires to the oem horn lead that trigger the relay is some black and blue cheap speaker wire.

I have another electrical issue but I'll start another thread of that one.
 
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