StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
2013 Suzuki V-Strom 650
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm a brand new owner of a 2013 V-strom 650. I think I got a great deal on the bike, it only has 2k miles on it so it has been sitting for quite a while. Before I try and start it I'm going to change all fluids and do a flush of the fuel system. It will need a new battery and tires as well. I'm not sure what state the fuel filters, fuel pump, or throttle bodies are in and that is why I'm looking for some advice.

I know this bike is fuel injected and I'm coming from a 80' KZ650 cafe racer that I built myself, so fuel injection is going to be a new experience for me. The tank doesn't smell like bad gas so that is a good sign, but I'd rather be safe and clean out the whole system. I'm guessing I should start with pulling the tank off and checking the pump and filters? Then move to the injectors and give those a clean. Am I on the right track?

What other things should I check? Are there any sensors that tend to go bad that I should replace now?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
286 Posts
⬆ What oldjeep said, + all fluids/tires like you said, get a quality battery. Do a search here on ABS related brake fluid change, though my 09 is non-abs, I've read that the brake fluid in the abs unit should be cycled/pumped out (the goal being to get the old fluid out of the abs unit itself). Also, give the chain a good lube job. Was bike stored outdoors? If yes, you may want to ensure connectors are not all oxidized. Tighten up bolts, shouldn't be loose at @ 2K, but never hurts to be sure. Just my 2C, I probably missed a few things, welcome and good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,326 Posts
Welcome to the forum and good luck with your new ride. You will love it. Add some more details where you are, your ride etc. You get better answers that way.

Don't turn on the ignition and don't run the fuel pump until you had a chance to check the tank. Siphon out the old fuel and then inspect. Hopefully its clean and just stale gas. If its rusted, there are posts here that have detailed what people did to try to clean and coat it. If its clean, great! Add fresh gas and just ride it after you done all the other maintenance items. I would not mess with the injectors unless you have engine issues. Maybe add some fuel additive as a precaution.

Change all fluids (except forks and shock). The coolant may still be ok, all be it older since it sat for so many years without being moved around. Definitely do the brakes. Change the fluid, then go and ride and activate both front and rear ABS multiple times (gravel or grassy surface, one at a time). Then go and change the fluid again. That should make sure to flush out the old and possibly oxidized fluid out of the ABS module. All other items are common sense checks, just like any other bike new to you.

Known issues over time are alternator failure (install a V meter to monitor what's going on) and the headlight cutout function of the starter switch. Search here, many threads about it. Cure: A headlight relay kit = only control current going through that switch or at least change over to LED lighting. If you take the bike apart and have access, add dielectric grease to the electrical connectors exposed to the elements and add protection to keep the rain etc out (inner tube over it and taped up so no water runs into the connectors).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,241 Posts
Provided you clean the tank everything may be O.K. Problem case is water or rust at the bottom of the tank, start the bike and all that crap gums up everything else. The injectors behave a BIT better than carbs when left standing.

So, empty the tank, check that it doesn't have rmasses of rust in the bottom add clean fresh fuel, fuel injection cleaner, battery. Possibly check the air cleaner for mice :)

If you do pull the injectors they will need new O-rings, make sure you have those on hand.

Check the oil level and try to start it. You do need an oil change, fresh brake fluid and coolant is about due, but provided there's oil and coolant them being old shouldn't cause damage in the short term. i.e. starting it at that point is fine and changing oil and coolant is best done when it's been circulating anyway.

Brakes are unpleasant. Basically bleed them first, get fresh fluid in there then find some gravel or grass and make the ABS work (About 20 times each end alas), that'll move the old fluid out of the ABS lines then do another brake fluid change. It's painful but without the dealer tool about the only way to do a complete fluid change. (There is another way, you can fake the ABS unit but it requires some home made gear).

Normal fluid changes are less painful, just make sure to test the brakes (i.e. cycle the ABS) every month or so and replace the fluid as normal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,739 Posts
Welcome. While you have the wheels off, you may as well check the bearings and cush rubbers. For the bearing test, one finger in each bearing, spin the wheel and feel whether the bearing turns freely or is there any binding. Have a look at Cush Drive Upgrades?.and What does this mean?. The latter link is for the Vee, but you can apply the same principle to your ride if needed.
 

·
Administrator
Queensland, Australia
Joined
·
6,966 Posts
You should definitely dump the old fuel and have a good look in the tank as it needs to come off to inspect/replace the air filter. If there is any sign of milkness in the engine oil (i.e. water) change it before startup, Otherwise change it after a good run. Brake fluid also.
Leave the injectors and plugs alone and install a new battery.
Welcome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,614 Posts
I've brought bikes to running shape that sat for decades with little more than some general cleaning and maintenance.

I'd get the $4 kerosene pump and suck out as much of the old fuel out then refill with new fuel. If the battery is good hit the starter and be wow'ed at how easy that was. Eventually I'd change all the fluids (becasue that's just what I do when I get a new to me bike) then clean//lube the chain and see what condition the tires are in then determine of you want/need to replace them.

No need for anything major like injector pulling or checking valves unless you are at that mileage/maintnenace interval.
 

·
Registered
2013 Suzuki V-Strom 650
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Wow, thanks for the advice. I feel like a newborn baby all swaddled up on this forum!

Sounds like if the tank is clean I should be good to go. I'll be sure to flush the brake fluid and get the ABS cycled like you guys mentioned.

The bike was stored outside but it had a motorcycle cover and it was under a covered patio in Arizona.

I'd like to put new tires on it because I don't trust tires that have been sitting that long in the hot AZ summers. Any recommendations on a more dual-purpose/on and offroad tire?

Pretty excited they threw in the bags with the bike. I got it for $2500.
282678
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,586 Posts
Holy crap, not a bad deal at all! (y)

I'd like to find a 2017 for around that price myself. :D

I'd go with Shinko 705 tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
373 Posts
The other reason you don't want to start it or run it before replacing the gas is the fuel filter.

It's inside the tank, and it's part of the fuel pump assembly. As such, it is not serviceable. So if the fuel filter gets all clogged up, you're forced to buy the whole fuel pump assembly. A bit pricey, but not a deal breaker if that's how it turns out.

There is a way to delete the internal fuel filter and add an in-line high pressure fuel filter below the tank so you can easily service the dang thing.

More likely is that you'll put fresh gas and battery in, and it will fire right up.

We're rooting for you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Congrats, that's a really good deal. I'm in a similar situation. Bought the same bike last summer, that had 2600 miles. Only 50 miles in the last 3 years. I don't know how old the gas was that was in the bike, I didn't think to ask. But it ran great from the time I got it all through fall and into December until I couldn't ride due to snow/ice. I changed the oil and coolant on it last fall. Checked the air filter while I had the gas tank off. All is ok. I ran the original tires, but need new ones now as there's not much tread left. So, i'm interested to hear other people's experience with tires also. The stock tires did fine for the amount of off-roading I do, and I like the way they work on the road. Good luck with the "new" bike!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
You may have opened a can of worms asking for tire recommendations...but I'll second the Shinko 705 recommendation you already have from @D.T. They're a fairly long lasting 80/20 tire, competent in most situations, and cheap as dirt besides. If you put them on and find you want something more towards the 50/50 range, you're not out much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
973 Posts
back in high school somebody would occasionally come up with something, bike or car, that hadn't been run in years. maybe years and years. among other things, we would pull the spark plugs, pour a good spoonful of motor oil into each cylinder and turn the engine over for a while. you could push a bike up and down in front of your house with the plugs out. a car engine with the plugs out turns over a lot easier so you can crank for a while on the starter. with the engine turning over it doesn't take long to get the oil pressure up. then you can put the plugs in and try to start it. the oil in the cylinder was to lubricate the cylinder bore as soon as the engine was turning over so that you are not pushing the pistons up and down in a dry cylinder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,241 Posts
No doubt that works and generally the car starts but it running badly or playing up later because of rust clogging the fuel filter or getting stuck in passages in the carb was common as well. And having had to deal with that a few times now, fresh fuel before you try and start it, carb or FI is #1.

That DL probably would crank and start with just a fresh battery, then we'd get the "My bike won't rev" question some time later. (Clogged fuel filter).
 

·
Administrator
Queensland, Australia
Joined
·
6,966 Posts
As a guy who once needed to rebuild a set of four carburetors and clean out, and then re-seal a petrol tank, I wholly agree. It a damn sight easier to take the time and effort at the beginning to ensure that you do not end up with a much bigger problem in a few hours time.
You should remove the tank anyway as there might be a family of mice who have been feeding on the air cleaner element.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,614 Posts
back in high school somebody would occasionally come up with something, bike or car, that hadn't been run in years. maybe years and years. among other things, we would pull the spark plugs, pour a good spoonful of motor oil into each cylinder and turn the engine over for a while. you could push a bike up and down in front of your house with the plugs out. a car engine with the plugs out turns over a lot easier so you can crank for a while on the starter. with the engine turning over it doesn't take long to get the oil pressure up. then you can put the plugs in and try to start it. the oil in the cylinder was to lubricate the cylinder bore as soon as the engine was turning over so that you are not pushing the pistons up and down in a dry cylinder.
This was probably more prudent when working on cast iron blocked motors where the rings would rust tight to the cylinder wall. With modern Nikasil (well not so modern anymore tech has been around for 50 years now) cylinders this a problem of yesteryear. The oil pump within a few revolutions will have primed and will be pushing oil where oil needs to go. As it were for the DL pouring oil in the cylinder really does nothing. It doesn't lube the :upper end" aka valve train and only the combustion side of the cylinder.

However if done right it won't hurt but the what it does is questionable. If done wrong you can hydro-lock the motor and cause damage like bent connecting rods.

I'm all for over maintaining and do it with each bike that I get. I don't so it so much for the well being of the bike becasue in all honesty its a durable machine that with minimal maintnenace will operate fine, I do it to get to know the bike and I like working on them.

If the OP goal is to get it running and rideable his bike will take very little effort and most like run trouble free for many 10's of 1000's of miles as is. But if he likes to tinker and turn a wrench then going over with a fine tooth comb that is okay too. Either way the bike will be the same as its doubtful he finds much if anything wrong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,586 Posts
Yeah, check the air box and around the engine for rodents nests since it was outside.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,086 Posts
I guess I am a bad person when it comes to starting up engines that have been sitting a long time.
I look at the oil, and if it looks like oil then it is good enough for the moment.
I drain some gas and if it doesn't smell like gas then I drain it all and replace
If I don't have to disassemble half the vehicle to do it then I will check the air filter and plugs
Then I stick a charger on the battery and then kick it over to see what happens

If I am lucky and it starts, then I'll change the oil, filter, air filter and maybe replace the brake fluid depending on what it looks like.
If it doesn't start then you start working through the spark/air/fuel process and see what is up there
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,614 Posts
I guess I am a bad person when it comes to starting up engines that have been sitting a long time.
I look at the oil, and if it looks like oil then it is good enough for the moment.
I drain some gas and if it doesn't smell like gas then I drain it all and replace
If I don't have to disassemble half the vehicle to do it then I will check the air filter and plugs
Then I stick a charger on the battery and then kick it over to see what happens

If I am lucky and it starts, then I'll change the oil, filter, air filter and maybe replace the brake fluid depending on what it looks like.
If it doesn't start then you start working through the spark/air/fuel process and see what is up there
This is probably a better approach, at least for the initial testing. In stead of fixing it until its broken just wait to see if anything needs fixin'.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top