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This isn't meant to be brand preference question, or a "what's the best" filter question, but more of a "what's this mean" question.

While changing the oil & filter over the weekend, I noticed the oil filter that was on the bike (from my first 600 mile oil change) said Made in USA on the label. The new filter I was installing was the same brand/same model, but it said Assembled in the USA.

Are they one in the same, or is this a strategic sourcing change?
 

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Could mean a couple things
One or more components are now being sourced overseas
They were always sourced overseas and assembled in the US, but updating the label

Either way, USUALLY assembled in the US has much better quality checks than made overseas, so i would feel that made or assembled should produce a similar filter.
 

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Yes, assembled in USA means the parts were put together here. Most, if not all, parts are made out of country and shipped here for assembly. I assume this is done to keep quality standards higher.

Made in USA should mean a certain percentage of the parts are actually made in the USA as well as assembled here. I don't know what the law says as far as percentages go.
 

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You can label Chinese apple juice as Canadian if the bottle costs more than the contents.
 

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parts made in china, assembled by mexicians in USA,,,,,,,:confused:
 

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I remember years ago how Sears caught some flak for sending wrench blanks to Japan for rough machining, then back to the US for final machining so they could have "Craftsman-Made in USA" stamped on them.
Ford took some heat by sourcing enough components outside the US in their Crown Victorias so they could be classified as imports to the tax people to lower their tax costs.

Snap-on reps dont use the words "Foreign" or "Imported" to describe their tools not made in the US. Their term is "Offshore".

I'm seeing more and more items being sold with the label "Assembled in the US from parts sourced globally."
 

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If its the same company i wouldn't worry about it too much. It has the advantage of being honest.


Unlike other companies that rebrand stuff from china, and then claim made in america.
 

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I say this as a fan of Harley motorcycles, but I've always been impressed by the cognitive dissonance of the Bar and Shield between the image they (and their diehard fan base) deliberately tailor that they're the embodiment of all things American, and the fact that they've been sourcing parts from multiple foreign countries for years. Seeing Harley project the image of "American Built, American Pride" while deftly ignoring the fact that they're building a bike with forks and electronics made in Japan and brakes made in Italy, among other parts, is a guaranteed laugh. They're deliberately vague on just how much of the construction of their bikes is outsourced, knowing how big of a dent it puts in the "America Built" mythology.

Even better is hearing one of the Faithful deride another bike as a rice burner or Jap Scrap, without a trace of awareness of the irony that the bike he's throwing a leg over has a fair amount of rice included in the sticker price.
 

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Yet where would Harley Davidson be without these "imported" parts?

Not all things imported are bad. Some are better quality than can be sourced here. I can show you some hardened, ground dowel pins I use in building clutch baskets that are made in Germany. Then show you the ones that are made in the USA. The German parts are higher quality in appearance, although the US ones seem to be consistent in sizing also (most important part).

It is a smaller world. Get used to imported products. They won't be going away.

Used to be the blame was on American labor, Unions being the main reason called out. But I never thought that was true. When you have pretty much zero environmental rules to follow, zero employee liabilities, and subvented resources provided by governments there is no competing with that. Yet, just like with Japan, the cycle only lasts so long. We are running out of people and environments that can be enslaved/ruined. China is already showing signs of having to change......
 

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Realshelby, I made that post not to condemn the practice, but to point out the hypocrisy. If you're going to have capitalism and a global economy, then the reality is that you're going to have to toss out "Buy American", because the Flag isn't your driving motivation; profit and loss is. The hypocrisy on HD's part is to obfuscate the practice in an attempt to maintain their image. If a guy has a board of directors and shareholders to answer to, and he can import a part at a third of the cost it takes for him to make it here with American labor, then you can bet he'll put on his red, white and blue ball cap and sign the contract with Denso of Japan.
 

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I got what you were saying.

Especially the hypocritical part!

Yet they done the right thing when going to these other companies. Made their bikes better. What you don't know won't hurt you.......
 

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Ford took some heat by sourcing enough components outside the US in their Crown Victorias so they could be classified as imports to the tax people to lower their tax costs.
I was selling Fords while the Crown Vics were still in production. They were assembled in St Thomas, Ontario, and had many parts produced in Canada.
Off topic but only for a short paragraph-
The window sticker then didn't have the country on them, only the city. I was working at our local Auto Show one year and heard one show-goer remark, "'Final Assembly: St Thomas.' Hmph. Didn't know they were made in the Virgin Islands!"
 

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I was Shop Foreman in a Mazda dealer's service department, dealt with problem cars, was a point of contact for their Tech Line.
One day we had a customer with a Mazda Navaho. Which was really Ford Explorer Sport.
He was telling me how much he enjoyed the vehicle, and made a point of how he was glad he bought a Japanese-made vehicle instead of a US-made vehicle.
So that it wouldnt come out later, I told him the Navaho is a Ford vehicle, produced in a joint venture with Mazda, made here in the US.. He came within an inch of calling me a liar,so...I showed him the VIN decal on the latch end of the driver's door. The words printed at the bottom of the Decal read.."Product of Ford Motor Company USA."
He looked at me like I just shot his dog and raped his mom. I pulled his car out of my stall, parked it on the lot, and I never saw him of that Navaho again.
I remember seeing some gal with a brand-new Dodge Caravan on the evening news crowing about how she felt cheated. She thought she was buying a Dodge made in a local assembly plant here in St. Louis, but infact the van was made in Canada!! The horrors!!!
I guess it all comes down to what's important to you in your purchases. The salesman that sold me my '19 Mazda CX-5 traded his personal '16 Mazda3 in on new '18 3 because the '19 US-market 3s are now all made in Mexico, not Japan.
I taught auto tech in addition to my duties at the Mazda dealership. I took my class to the Chrysler assembly plant for a field trip. Our tour guide wasted no time in beating his chest about how their vehicles were far better than the Japanese junk on the market(his words. We were warned not to park any imported cars on the lot--they couldnt promise against possible vandalism). I asked him about all the Mitsubishi engines I saw being installed on the assembly line, and how all the machinery had names like "Ryobi" and Niichi-Ra". He went into a 3 minute red-faced rant about trade practices, but never did answer my question.
I prefer that my vehicles are produced in the manufacturer's home country. But at the same time, I realize it's a global economy.
 

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From the Federal Trade Commission ...

"The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is charged with preventing deception and unfairness in the marketplace. The FTC Act gives the Commission the power to bring law enforcement actions against false or misleading claims that a product is of U.S. origin. Traditionally, the Commission has required that a product advertised as Made in USA be "all or virtually all" made in the U.S. After a comprehensive review of Made in USA and other U.S. origin claims in product advertising and labeling, the Commission announced in December 1997 that it would retain the "all or virtually all" standard. "
 

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I was once having a.."spirited discussion" with some Harley riders. The words "Rice-burner" and "Jap Junk" were mentioned by them.
I pointed out that their forks were made by Showa, the old carbs were made by Keihin--both divisions of Honda Motor Company. Ignition items were made by Nippon Denso, a division of Toyota. The Vrod pistons were made by Mahle in Germany.
That when I went into a HD dealer and most of the accessories were made in Taiwan and Mexico.
Their response? "We dont give a rat's ass about any of that. All we care about is that the Harleys are bullt here in the USA with US labor."
I mentioned Hondas built in Ohio for that, and Kawasakis built in Nebraska. They had no response other than.."Well, you have to look at where the profit ends up." I mentioned Americans employed by those plants and dealerships and taxes paid to local governments.
Then they changed the subject.
 

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I was once having a.."spirited discussion" with some Harley riders. The words "Rice-burner" and "Jap Junk" were mentioned by them.
I pointed out that their forks were made by Showa, the old carbs were made by Keihin--both divisions of Honda Motor Company. Ignition items were made by Nippon Denso, a division of Toyota. The Vrod pistons were made by Mahle in Germany.
That when I went into a HD dealer and most of the accessories were made in Taiwan and Mexico.
Their response? "We dont give a rat's ass about any of that. All we care about is that the Harleys are bullt here in the USA with US labor."
I mentioned Hondas built in Ohio for that, and changed the subject. and Kawasakis built in Nebraska. They had no response other than.."Well, you have to look at where the profit ends up." I mentioned Americans employed by those plants and dealerships and taxes paid to local governments.
Then they changed the subject.
Yup that is what "extremely" biased, ignorant hypocrites tend to do. LOL
 

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We worry about foreign countries stealing our jobs with cheap labor, meanwhile the computer and robotics revolution is costing many manufacturing jobs. Immigration is costing good jobs in the construction industry. McDonald's is going to automated ordering and playing with robotic burger flippers.

The quest for shareholder value will starve us to death.

God bless our grand children.
 

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We tend to blame corporate greed for outsourcing to achieve higher profits.
In fact it is the American consumer who drives these decisions.
When the imports come in at 30% below domestic products and take 80% of the market for that reason a manufacturer either searches for lower cost components or goes bust.
Cost of goods to meet consumer price demand drives the shift from "Manufactured" to "Assembled".
In Harley's case it appears they are sourcing superior components offshore. The Harlistas should brag about their Japanese forks.
 
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