StromTrooper banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I had my heart set on a 2013 DL650, but after I had the chance to sit on it I felt the seat height was just a little too tall for my 29" inseam. I did a bit more reading and found that three seats were available at the time of purchase. Are these seats marked in any way so that they cam be identified as to their seat height?
I knew that front suspension height could be altered by sliding the fork tubes up, in the triple clamps. Can anyone tell me how much distance is possible here?
I'm sure someone has used lowering links for the rear. Could you share your knowledge of these. Effectiveness, pros and cons, effects on handling etc. Any other tips on lowering are more than welcome.
I appreciate anyone's experience or opinion. I really like this bike but I need to be reasonably sure it can be made to fit my inseam challenged anatomy.
Thanks
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
5,238 Posts
My advice is only lower as much as you need to. It affects use of the side stand and center stand and cornering clearance. This is from my website:

The easiest way to tell what size link you need is to place boards of various thickness ...

For raising , "under the rear wheel." This accurately simulates the effect of a raising link on the rear of the bike.

For lowering, "next to your bike for your boots to rest on." This gives the same effect as a lowering link and raising the fork tubes in the triple clamps the same amount as the lowering value of the lowering links.

Do this on level concrete (e.g., your garage floor). It helps top judge the effect on the side and center stands as well. A 3/4" thick board (standard 1 by 6 is actually 3/4" b 5.75") simulates a 3/4" link (or for lowering link and fork tube height change). Plywood thickness is actually as stated. A 1/2" or 3/4" plywood board under the rear tire will have the same effect as a 1/2' or 3/4" raising link. Use multiple boards stacked for other sizes.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top