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Discussion Starter #1
Before I am criticized for this thread, I did searches and could not find any info on this specific topic.
My 2012 Adventure has a number of threaded holes where the rear suspension is connected to the frame as shown in the attachment. What are these holes used for? Can any of them be used to alter the ride height instead of using the lowering links?
Thanks
 

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The top & bottom holes are for the center stands, not sure about the others.

On the right side of your photo, see the metal bar going upwards? That is a link that you change out to raise/lower the bike.

The longer the link, the lower your bike will be. Here is what they look like removed:

 

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On the thread you will see numerous vendors that sell lowering links from 3/4 to 1 1/4 inch, which I think is the maximum. A friend of mine has an adjustable lowering link. I personally chose the Kouba 3/4 inch link. Well constructed and reasonably priced. Takes about 15 minutes to do, but if you include lowering the front (by raising the forks in the triple tree) the same 3/4 inch, about 40 minutes. Well respected authorities on this forum made the recommendation (very good resources here like Greywolf). Very easy and no reason to have the dealer do this for you. An opportunity to learn something about you're bike!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks

Thanks for the responses. I originally thought I'd get used to the height of this bike but there are still times when I struggle to get my toes down. I am planning to install a lowering kit this winter. When I was looking a little closer at what I would have to do I noticed that cast piece in the photo(in my first post) with all the threaded holes. Knowing holes and threads cost money, I just had to ask the question. Thanks again.
Mike
 

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I don't know what you've adjusted on the bike, but you can get a lower seat and also take all the preload off the rear suspension.

When you lower the bike, there are trade offs and I would try the above first. I at first thought I'd have to lower my 2013 DL650 Adv, but as I've put on more miles, it hasn't been an issue and I keep mine in the stock setting for a solo rider. When I ride 2 up, I set the preload to its maximum and with the additional weight I can still flat foot the bike. I have about a 30 " inseam.
 

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I don't know what you've adjusted on the bike, but you can get a lower seat and also take all the preload off the rear suspension.
It's not a good idea to use preload to lower a bike. You want about 40mm of sag from full extension when loaded. With no preload, you are likely to bottom out the suspension on rough patches.
 

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You need to understand that when putting lowering links on a bike it changes the geometry of the suspension and softens the ride. I lowered my klr 1.5 inches with links and the suspension bottomed out easily when I off roaded the bike. Also you will probably need to either cut down the side stand or replace it with a shorter one. Once you lower the bike the side stand will be too long and the bike will sit too upright on the stand and possibly tip over.
 

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My bike came with the Kouba 1-1/8" link. I think the forks were disassembled and lowered internally since the bike appears to sit perfectly level and handles great, despite not being raised in the triple tree.

I love the height, but the ground clearance sucks. I've actually scraped my skidplate on asphalt in tight turns where the asphalt is slightly uneven. I'm really thinking about bringing it up a bit by getting the 3/4" version, but if I do, I need to wait til I put springs and valving in the forks so I can reverse the spacers to get them back to the stock length.

Rob
 

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With the front fork at full extension, measure the distance between the top of the dust seal and the bottom of the triple clamp. The stock length is a little over 160mm. Unless yours is significantly shorter, you have a stock fork. Internal fork changes to lower the front are extremely rare. You can't really tell by eye if the bike is at stock level.
 

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Thanks! I'll try to remember to do that today. I sincerely hope it's been lowered; otherwise it means my ground clearance is even worse!

Rob
 

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It is so much more work to add a spacer internally than to raise the tubes in the triple clamp, I don't hold out much hope.
 

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Oh, agreed there. I did that in my DR650. Or more accurately, it was already done when I got it, and when I disassembled the forks to put in springs and gold valves, I made sure to put them back in there in the lowered position.

But since the bike also came with the factory heated grips ($300!!) I do wonder if it didn't all get done by the dealer.

Rob
 

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Yeah that could be it. It was on the return spring. The instructions with the Gold Valve called it a spacer. If it was on top of the spring it was in one setting, on the bottom, the other.

Rob
 

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The top spacer just provides the right preload range while allowing for accessories like aftermarket valves. It is a stock item that can be cut or replaced to accommodate things like Gold Valves, does not limit travel and does not change the front end height when the sag is properly adjusted via the preload adjusters.
 
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