StromTrooper banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I noticed that when I select the high beam only the high beam portion of the bulb illuminates. However, when flash to pass both the high and low beam illuminate. What would I need to do to have the low beam stay on all the time, even when high beam is selected? Flash to pass provides a lot more light than low or high alone, so why not have both on at the same time?

Another reason would be some of the HID kits have HID as the low and Halogen as the high. Switching back and forth turns the HID on and off, not good for any HID.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,452 Posts
H4 Relay Kit

Eastern Beaver's H4 Relay Kit could be modified pretty easily to run both simultaneously. However, the current draw might be more than either the alternator or the wiring can support on a continuous basis. Doing it without a relay that bypasses the handlebar switches would be a very bad idea; they handlebar switches and wiring can barely support the current draw now.

There is so much light available with SilverStar H4 bulbs and the Eastern Beaver kit, running both beams seems like overkill to me.
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,048 Posts
Both beams could also put out more heat than the mounting area could handle. Running lights can be mounted to provide a triangle of light that make it easier for others to notice your bike as well as determine your distance and speed. With HIDs, stick to the type that move the lamp or its shutter to change between lo and hi beams.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
Y'all probably know this, but the manual says to not run them both with the switch in the middle position.

I used to mid-switch-it all the time on an old Virago. (Not saying that makes it ok.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
OK, so what is the "flash to pass" thing for? Do you flash it before you pass someone?

(Sorry for another stupid newbie question.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
I think Eastern Beaver makes a harness that will allow both filaments on at the same time, they also advise against it. Heat can be a problem, also with both lights on, the eye will naturally follow the brightest area, which would be the low beams. When you probably should be focused further ahead. FWIW
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
13,555 Posts
I don't understand why you really want the lows on at the same time as the highs anyway. My cars do that and it's a bit silly (although one does it because it has Bi-Xenon headlights so turning off the low is not a good idea.)

Why would you want to look at something a few feet in font of you when you should be looking down the road anyway? It's as dumb as people driving along with fog lights on in normal conditions.

As far as flash to pass: I use it all the time to give people a quick notice that I'm passing them. If I am passing a few cars at one time It is even more important to flash it (it would be about the only time I would see any value in a headlight modulator.)

..Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,355 Posts
Being a guy that loves riding at night, I also found that option of running both high and low. I installed halogen running lights on my forks at the fender bolts but removed the 50 or 55 watt bulbs replacing them with 35's.

I usually run all three when on the roads late at night when there is no other traffic. It does a fantastic job of "lighting my life" near and far and since my right side running light points a little to the right, it illuminates the shoulder as well. I don't worry about the heat since I'm moving on the highway and am religious about switching to low when traffic approaches. To date, I never had any issues with it running my battery down either but I have been curious as to what was happening when I had all three illuminated at the same time.

I was puttering in the garage last night and just for kicks, hooked up the volt meter while cycling the lights. At idle with low beam only I was getting roughly 14-14.5. It was steady as a rock no matter if I reved it to 4500rpm or let it idle. When I added the running lights there was no change. On high beam only there was no change. I have the running lights wired so they do not stay on with the high beam(I can activate the running lights with either low beam or high and low together, but not high alone). BUT when I moved the switch to the middle position and had both low and highs on my voltage dropped to 12 or just over it. It didn't make any difference when I added the running lights . The only time my volts dropped was with high and low on together. I would have expected that adding the running lights to the low/high would have dropped it but it didn't. Aw well....just sharing what I found for whatever it's worth.

jeff
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,975 Posts
OK, so what is the "flash to pass" thing for? Do you flash it before you pass someone?

(Sorry for another stupid newbie question.)
Flash to Pass is what Europeans do. If a vehicle is in the left lane ( which is against the law in europe unless passing only) you are to give them ample warning that you are coming up fast and want to pass. That person had better move to the right fast, especially in Germany since there is no speed limit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
That person had better move to the right fast, especially in Germany since there is no speed limit.
But apparently if you have an accident on the Autobahn and you were going over 130 km/h you may very well pay for the damages

http://drive55.org/content/view/22/4/

Accidents occurring at speeds of over 130 kph on the autobahns can result in insurance payment claims being annulled regardless of who was at fault.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,415 Posts
Sadly, we don't get flash to pass switches here in the states... :headbang:

If you do flash to pass, the left lane squatters usually have no idea what it means, and you're quite likely to encounter some idiotic form of retaliation or blocking behavior.

Yep, we'll give a license and a car loan to pretty much anyone...


Back to the topic, I have seen a TL1000 front headlight with a melted area in the lens that resulted from a higher-wattage headlamp. So using both filaments at once (in a regular bulb) could easily result in similar overheating situation. YMMV, don't try this at home, consult your physician before beginning, etc.
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,048 Posts

·
What Kinda Bike Is That?
Joined
·
5,520 Posts
Both beams could also put out more heat than the mounting area could handle. Running lights can be mounted to provide a triangle of light that make it easier for others to notice your bike as well as determine your distance and speed. With HIDs, stick to the type that move the lamp or its shutter to change between lo and hi beams.
When I was going through my "trial and error" bench testing to install my Buell headlights, part of that process took me a few steps down the path of having both filaments of the H4 bulbs light up. I can pretty much guarentee the OP that having both filaments running at the same time will melt something. It gives off a tremendous amount of heat.

I imagine it will fry the wiring harness and the stator in a relatively short time other then that quick one or two seconds when the Passing Light switch is used.

(I never have used that switch. I just pass.).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
Yep my 09 has it too.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,404 Posts
Y'all probably know this, but the manual says to not run them both with the switch in the middle position.

I used to mid-switch-it all the time on an old Virago. (Not saying that makes it ok.)
I never even noticed you could.
And nice bikes, those old Viragos. Comfortable, good grunt.
And dependable Yamaha charging systems.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top