StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
489 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just bought a 2012 Adventure with 4200 miles. I ride pretty fast but not that fast, all on road with lots on highway.

My mileage started at (I think) 48 when I bought bike. I am now at 41 MPG.

My previous bike with a 2007. My mileage was never this low.

Any thoughts?
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
How fast? Speed kills mileage. I get a little over 60mpg at 60mph in the summer. 75mph drops the mileage into the 40s. Cold air is denser and drops fuel economy more. Winter fuel is more volatile and drops even more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
Winter blend gas?

My CB1100 was getting 47-52 mpg and has slipped to the low 40s. My Honda Accord was getting 27-28 and now down to 24-25. Looks like 10-15% across the board.
 

·
Bikeless 4 now
Joined
·
1,226 Posts
I just rode hundreds of miles with temps in the 40's at 75-80 mph into a wind through Texas and my gas mileage was around 30-35 mpg. Once the temp warmed up to 60's and I hit the mountains it was up around 50+ mpg. Now riding around at 50-65 mph its 55-60 mpg. Mileage varies with the environment and circumstances a lot on this bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
How fast? Speed kills mileage. I get a little over 60mpg at 60mph in the summer. 75mph drops the mileage into the 40s. Cold air is denser and drops fuel economy more. Winter fuel is more volatile and drops even more.
I knew speed kills mileage. I did not know temperature and octane were major factors but what you said matches my experience driving to Albuquerque. And here I thought I knew it all.
 

·
Bikeless 4 now
Joined
·
1,226 Posts
Finaljudgement, I'm down in Gilbert now till Sunday. Where are you located?
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
Winter blend fuel is not about octane but octane but volatility.
 

·
Official Stromtrooper.com Sponsor
Joined
·
5,424 Posts
Don't pay a lot of attention to the dash mpg readout. Mine is pretty much useless when compared to actual mpg manually calculated by taking miles ridden and dividing by gallons used.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
615 Posts
OUTBACKWACK, lovin' the new avatar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
I just rode hundreds of miles with temps in the 40's at 75-80 mph into a wind through Texas and my gas mileage was around 30-35 mpg. Once the temp warmed up to 60's and I hit the mountains it was up around 50+ mpg. Now riding around at 50-65 mph its 55-60 mpg. Mileage varies with the environment and circumstances a lot on this bike.
Cold temps shouldn't effect mileage. Seems like your mileage got better the closer to home you got. Does Arizona even have winter blend fuel? I know in the winter months my mileage goes down in all of my vehicles. I hate winter blend fuel! Cold temps with normal blend gas should actually improve mileage because of the colder denser air.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
Colder temperatures will increase fuel consumption regardless of whether winter blend fuel is used. The computer riches up the fueling to compensate for the denser air to maintain an appropriate A/F ratio.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
928 Posts
The other factor that will affect mileage is tire pressure. I went from 34, 36 to 36, 40 (front, rear) last summer and gained 4 mpgs.
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
It isn't the mixture that affects fuel because of denser air. The throttle isn't opened as much to get the same amount of air molecules for the same power as in warmer temps.

What colder, denser air does is to increase the power needed to punch through it. Motorcycles are very aerodynamically dirty. Colder, denser air and high speeds are the enemy to fuel economy as more power is needed to push more air molecules aside.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
I really haven't noticed much (if any difference) in fuel economy in winter. 100% gasoline is widely available at most service stations here, and I use that exclusively in my DL650. It costs about 20-30 cents more per gallon than the E10 fuel.

Back to the original post, as long as you keep your speeds below 70mph, you should get pretty decent mileage. Are you riding it with the side cases on? Those will definitely affect mileage from what I've read on this site.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
It isn't the mixture that affects fuel because of denser air. The throttle isn't opened as much to get the same amount of air molecules for the same power as in warmer temps.
Only true if you do not take advantage of the extra power from the denser air charge. My throttle hand tends to get more aggressive with additional power on tap.

Doesn't the ECU enrich the fuel mixture during engine warm up based on intake air temps? In colder weather, engines take longer to reach operating temp, so would burn more fuel, right? I could see this impacting mileage more if you make shorter trips.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
13,741 Posts
Don't pay a lot of attention to the dash mpg readout. Mine is pretty much useless when compared to actual mpg manually calculated by taking miles ridden and dividing by gallons used.
I find the trip computer on my 2012 DL650 is very useful. I reset trip 2 when I fill-up. I have recorded every drop of fuel and the mileage on the odo when I fill.

Over about 74,000 miles it has averaged 95% accuracy vs the distance/mile calculation. As it gets warmer it is consistently pessimistic with it becoming more pessimistic. (ie the mileage it shows is worse than actual in hotter weather, getting down to 93%.) In temperatures nearing freezing it becomes very accurate being at 100% or in extreme case slightly optimistic. This means in cold weather i have to be careful not to assume I have more fuel than I do.

..Tom
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
Doesn't the ECU enrich the fuel mixture during engine warm up based on intake air temps? In colder weather, engines take longer to reach operating temp, so would burn more fuel, right? I could see this impacting mileage more if you make shorter trips.
More fuel is injected with the same volume of denser air but the mixture is not richer. There is more of both and the ratios remain the same. Less volume is required to make the same power. Longer warm up times are part of the reason cold weather mileage is worse. Denser air, colder lubricants, longer warm up times and winter fuel blends are all involved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
More fuel is injected with the same volume of denser air but the mixture is not richer. There is more of both and the ratios remain the same. Less volume is required to make the same power. Longer warm up times are part of the reason cold weather mileage is worse. Denser air, colder lubricants, longer warm up times and winter fuel blends are all involved.
I didn't mean to use the term richer fuel mixture, just more fuel. As you said, the a/f ratio is the same. Chalk it up to my lazy, quasi - redneck terminology. We are on the same page, though my poor choice of words suggested otherwise.

Edit: I just though of something. Isn't the fuel mixture richer at start-up in the same way old carbuerated engines use a choke and some early FI bikes had an enrichener circuit (first gen Hayabusa comes to mind)?
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
Yes. That's why longer warm up times use more fuel.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top