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Discussion Starter #1
I have been scouring my area for the best deal on a 2012 Wee Orange model. So far I have come up with best OTD prices of $8309 for a new 0 mile bike and $7800 OTD for a 2012 demo with 300 miles? Do you guys think these are decent deals and which would you recommend I go for?

The demo includes the same warranty as new, so this doesn't really affect the deal and the dealer states there is not a scratch on it, although haven't seen it in person yet. I am leaning towards the demo model...
 

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I'd be concerned about demo riders reving the engine hard. It is probably OK, but I follow break in procedures. One needs to confirm that the warranty time starts when you buy it, not when it was first put into service. When the salesman says that it has the same warranty as new, have them put into writing that the warranty covers the full 12 months of your ownership, even if the dealership covers the time after the factory warranty expires..
 

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I would also be concerned about the break in. I find it difficult to keep the RPM's below 5000 for the first 800km, it would probably be impossible for someone driving a Demo, and this will be YOUR BIKE! Don't buy the Demo!
 

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Go for the new one Mate - I did two test rides on a demo and gave it some stick, if others do it, it may not be as good as new....

I got the all black 2012 - its a brilliant bike Mate
 

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GO FOR WHICHEVER ONE FLOATS YER BOAT// there are 2 schools of thought on breakin.. and there are some REAL SAAVY engine guys that believe you should run em hard at breakin for proper ring seating.. FLAME SUIT ON
 

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I would also be concerned about the break in. I find it difficult to keep the RPM's below 5000 for the first 800km, it would probably be impossible for someone driving a Demo, and this will be YOUR BIKE! Don't buy the Demo!
There is no break in.......there is no break in.:headbang:
 

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The engine gets way higher than 5000rpm on the dyno before leaving the factory. I get the impression the break in procedure in the manual is designed to break in the rider.
 

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GO FOR WHICHEVER ONE FLOATS YER BOAT// there are 2 schools of thought on breakin.. and there are some REAL SAAVY engine guys that believe you should run em hard at breakin for proper ring seating.. FLAME SUIT ON
No flame suit required. This is totally correct.

Airplane owners with $50,000 engines do the same thing. Hard and over square during break in. Engine will be much happier.



Sent from my droid.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I talked the dealer into including the 600 mile service for the $7800 OTD price as well I am seriously leaning towards the demo bike. On another note, does anyone have any opinion about Suzuki extended warranties? This will be my first "new bike", but I have ridden and maintained my own bikes for 20+ years with very few issues and plan on continuing my own maintenance and repairs(unless it is covered under warranty)
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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An extended warranty is like gambling in Las Vegas. The odds are way in favor of the house. If you can do some of your own work, really opt out.
 

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I have been scouring my area for the best deal on a 2012 Wee Orange model. So far I have come up with best OTD prices of $8309 for a new 0 mile bike and $7800 OTD for a 2012 demo with 300 miles? Do you guys think these are decent deals and which would you recommend I go for?

The demo includes the same warranty as new, so this doesn't really affect the deal and the dealer states there is not a scratch on it, although haven't seen it in person yet. I am leaning towards the demo model...
They both sound like very good deals to me. The demo model is less than some have recentlt paid for 2011's!

If it looked perfect, I'd probably go the dealer model. $500 will buy a very nice farkle or two. Most strom demo riders probably wouldn't flog the piss out of it.
 

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The engine gets way higher than 5000rpm on the dyno before leaving the factory. I get the impression the break in procedure in the manual is designed to break in the rider.
Agreed. My bike had 0.1 kms on the clock when I picked it up, and the exhaust pipe was already 7 shades of blue.
It had definitely seen some heat:yikes:
 

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GO FOR WHICHEVER ONE FLOATS YER BOAT// there are 2 schools of thought on breakin.. and there are some REAL SAAVY engine guys that believe you should run em hard at breakin for proper ring seating.. FLAME SUIT ON
The guys who build the bikes and have degrees in engineering are probably a better source of knowledge for break in procedures.
 

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The guys who build the bikes and have degrees in engineering are probably a better source of knowledge for break in procedures.
I agree! I am not a mechanic, but I do use logic and common sense. When an engine is built, it is built with fitting tolerances. The higher the rpm's, the more energy(heat) builds up loosening those tolerances. This is something that you want to do slowly, whereas if you do it abruptly right at the start, the tolerances and thresholds will be set wider than if it is slowly worked in. This should not affect performance much, but it could affect overall reliability, and fuel economy. I am going to follow the break in procedures, because if there was no need to, then they would not be set in the manual.
 

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The engine is wrung out on a dyno in a specific sequence that includes very near red line at the factory before the odometer is hooked up. The break in process in the manual is written by lawyers rather than engineers.
 

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The engine is wrung out on a dyno in a specific sequence that includes very near red line at the factory before the odometer is hooked up. The break in process in the manual is written by lawyers rather than engineers.
Hmmm, I am confused! What does the break in period have to do with liability? I remember in 1978, my friends dad talking about breaking in his new CBX, which he hated to do as it was the fastest production bike at that time. Company lawsuits and legality was not as pronounced back then as it is today which is evident by the multitude of stickers that I had to remove from my bike, being in Canada, I had twice as many as I had them in French as well :furious:. My bike looked like a billboard!
I am turning 48, and as far as I know, there has ALWAYS been a breakin period for new vehicles since vehicles were first built.
I mean, this is something that is clearly ones own choice. I can't see it really affecting the vehicle that drastically, violating the breakin period, as most of us will trade it in after 2-3 years, so who cares.
 

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buy the demo and save some $$$

I agree with greywolf...the factory turns them "on" and cranks them up to make sure each one of them is fine to go out the door...and into your garage.
Every new bike I have ever owned I just drive it like I normally would...and have never had a problem. The only thing I have done is change the oil out at 50 or so miles. You might notice something that looks like a grey swirl in the oil. That is from the stuff they use when they assemble the engine. On my '08 KLR it took two oil changes to get rid of all of it.
When I picked up my bike, this week, I just turned it on and drove it home. I am sure if you pay attention to the speed limit signs you will have a "perfect" breakin.
 

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Hmmm, I am confused! What does the break in period have to do with liability?
First the extreme example. In case of catastrophic failure causing injury, Suzuki can put forth the possibility the break in procedure was not followed to reduce a judgment. The big thing though is to break in the rider. The procedure makes the rider take it easy until he/she is more familiar with the bike. Also, it's a carry over from the days owners actually had to break in machinery and thus is expected. Buyers may be wary of any changes and be reluctant to buy.
 

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Just to expand on break in periods: my Ultralight airplane has a motor built by Rotax designed specifically for Ultralight Aircraft. The Break-in procedure involves about an hour with a cycle something like this:

Fast idle 5 minutes
rev to 3000 rpm for one minute then back to fast idle for one minute. repeat 5 times
rev to 4000 rpm for one minute then back to fast idle for one minute. repeat 5 times
rev to 5000 rpm for one minute then back to fast idle for one minute. repeat 5 times
rev to 6000 rpm for one minute then back to fast idle for one minute. repeat 5 times

and so on.

The idea is the parts get hot and the idle time between reving gives heat buildup time to dissipate.

I sell Porsche for a living. I visited the factory and saw that every one of our sports car engines is assembled by one individual. When he is done it is taken to a test stand and filled with fluids. The a procedure very similar to above is followed with the power output being measured at the end. (It doesn't go into a car if it doesn’t meet the minimum rated power.) When you take delivery of the new car Porsche still wants you to follow a break in procedure, which used to be 1,600 km but now is 3,000 km although as far as I know the engines are the same.

I suspect liability issues are the reason as if there was a problem with the engine later and there weren't instructions to break it in then the company might have liability.


..Tom
 

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First the extreme example. In case of catastrophic failure causing injury, Suzuki can put forth the possibility the break in procedure was not followed to reduce a judgment. The big thing though is to break in the rider. The procedure makes the rider take it easy until he/she is more familiar with the bike. Also, it's a carry over from the days owners actually had to break in machinery and thus is expected. Buyers may be wary of any changes and be reluctant to buy.

:iagree:


Gotta do what the laywers say in big business. That's why there are 100 warning stickers on the bike too.
 
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