StromTrooper banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
does anyone know where you can get, or who makes aftermarket brake pedals?

i have only seen of and heard of the Touratech folding one. I bent mine in an incident yesterday and am looking to replace it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
here are some pics of my busted pedal

bump...

wanted to post some broken pedal pictures to see if anyone has an answer to my aftermarket brake pedal question.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
515 Posts
That looks like its just bent? I would bend it back into place
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
i actually have tried to bend it back into place, as that was my initial thought too. but i was unsuccessful, and once this cheap metal bends back it would be very fatigued. so i am leery about bending it back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Looks like the OEM one is about $70 and the tourtech one is about $100.

How many more "incedents" do you plan on having?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
349 Posts
I don't think anybody plans on dropping their bike. For 30.00 dollars more for the Touratech isn't very much more and it is made out of steel that can be bent back if it does get bent. The stock pedal will break if you try to bend it very far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Looks like the OEM one is about $70 and the tourtech one is about $100.

How many more "incedents" do you plan on having?
yeah i have seen the prices, i was just seeing really if anyone knew of any other options that google wasn't able to find for me.

and i don't "plan" on having any more incidents, especially pavement related ones. i have been riding it almost everyday since i got it, and everyday i am getting more used to it (it's a bit different than my harley was)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I don't think anybody plans on dropping their bike. For 30.00 dollars more for the Touratech isn't very much more and it is made out of steel that can be bent back if it does get bent. The stock pedal will break if you try to bend it very far.
+1

this was my exact thought as well, which is another reason i asked this question. i have always been a steel fan over cheap pot metal.

i have a feeling i will be going with the touratech replacement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
Given the effectiveness of the rear brake, you could also just substitute thinking vague thoughts about slowing down for replacing the pedal... it would do just about as much good without any chance of locking the rear wheel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Given the effectiveness of the rear brake, you could also just substitute thinking vague thoughts about slowing down for replacing the pedal... it would do just about as much good without any chance of locking the rear wheel.
haha! very good point.

but i will admit that i am a huge rear brake user...whether it be to help me slow down before a corner to keep the front from diving, or using it when i am in traffic to help me remain stable and balanced without putting my feet on the ground....

i am planning a brake upgrade later this summer all around the bike to improve braking. hoping that pads will help get what i want, as i don't want to have to do the gsxr conversion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,442 Posts
i am a huge rear brake user.
As a rule of thumb, the traction a tire has on the ground depends on the weight on that tire, other things remaining equal. When braking, as the weight transfers forward the traction also transfers forward from the rear tire to the front tire. If your braking effort exceeds the traction, you skid. On pavement skidding the rear is both easier and may have a worse outcome than skidding the front.

There is no valid rule to what percentage of braking to use on each end of the bike...70-30, 75-25, etc. are all bunk. Taper braking is needed where the rear braking effort starts off pretty firm then is reduced as weight transfers off the rear. Simultaneously front braking effort is increased as weight transfers forward. Just before stopping, increase rear effort and reduce front effort. Front end dive is corrected by front suspension modifications and reduced by smooth braking, not by inadequate front braking.

Upgrading the fronts to HH rated pads is good. EBC and Galfer brand HH pads are good. The rear is good with organic pads, either Suzuki OE, EBC, or Galfer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
i should have stated that better. i'm a huge user of the rear for slowing down only. when it comes to stopping i am all about the front with some pressure on the rear.

i feel the strom brakes will be adequate with better pads, i have read through the brake forums and i like what i hear about just upgraded pads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
287 Posts
I put HH rated pads on the front and it gives it a bit more bite which I like. It was a cheap, simple, and quick upgrade. I was thinking of doing a bit more (calipers, better master cylinder I have laying around in my garage), but honestly with the HH pads the braking is good enough for me.

I'll be getting braided brake lines when I put my bar risers on anyway which may or may not help it a little more.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top