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This was pretty easy; the instructions aren’t bad, if a little ropey. The drawings are a bit naff. However you would need a degree in stupidity to mess it up even with the artwork lacking Van Gough’s deft touch.









I assembled the head before I started taking pictures, but you lose nothing by not seeing just the bits. You do need to be gentle when fitting the ends of the cable ties to make the oil guides and tightening the ties that hold it all together.

Bending the wire that holds the head is not as much fun, it gets scratched and a bit knobbly after all the dips and turns are made, and you need to take account of the extra millimetre the feet add to the basic fit. In retrospect I should have put insulating tape around the jaws to prevent abrasion.







I added the third foot to the top of the swing arm to keep the wire off the Ally (Aluminium) and in doing so created (accidentally) a nice little run for the feed tube, which takes it well out of harms way. I'm going to put some more ties round the wires like little bumpers, again just to keep all the wire off of the frame.





The bottle was easy to place but fiddly to get the top cable tie in, and you need to mess around with the tubes position inside the bottle once fitted to ensure that it sits at the lowest part of the bottle (obvious but takes a few minutes of twiddling).



All fitted and waiting to filled and tried, I couldn’t do it today because I’m not allowed out on the bike till Friday, because her Ladyship says I’ve got to help get the house ready for her birthday. :?





The frog in the brick acts as a nice lift in the absence of a paddock stand to get the bike upright.



:D

The cat had the hump because she uses the bike seat as somewhere to lie when it’s too hot in the back garden :wink:



Its cheap as chips, it can run on chainsaw oil or 10W40 I'm going to try the chainsaw oil first, partly because its bio-degradeable and partly because i've got loads of it and its a lot cheaper than 10W40.

I’ll scribble an addendum once I’ve filled the bottle and been out for a few miles.
 

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I've got one of these. Have about 1,000 miles on it. I have gone through 2 plastic zip-tie ends used to deliver the oil (and it is currently broken again).

Most of this (say 75%) is due to the poor job I did bending the wire. A little bit (say 25%) is due to how long the wire has to travel without support to position the head assembly correctly when mounted on a Strom.

When bouncing along dirt roads, the vibration causes the oil delivery zip-tie end thingies to break off.

Based on your pictures, I believe you did a better job of minimizing the length of unsupported wire than I did. I should rebend my install to match yours. I hope your mounting prevents the broken tip syndrome I suffer.

The job of replacing the zip-tie ends isn't hard, just obnoxiously filthy and takes up time that would be better spent riding.

In general, the simple approach taken by the Loobman appeals to me. It would be ideal if there was less opportunity for wire-bending challenged folk like me to mess up.
 

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Have I got this right - you have to reach down and squeeze the bottle as you ride? Doesn't it make a mess over time? I just spray my chain when I fuel up or after a wash of some sort - seems to work OK.
Keep repoting.

Al
 
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I can be quite sad at times

I cogitated for several days about wire bending, broken tips, overall vibration blah blah blah. The extra bending that creates the "swan neck" for want of a better term, will either cause more overall rubbing at the tips which will wear them off, or (I'm hoping) will allow the flexion/vibration to be dispersed, I've also tied the tube to the wire and hopefully this will also dampen vibration. The extra bend did leave me with a short wire for making the brace but I think this may well have worked to my advantage in the end, because I then had to tweak the wire inside the groove on the swing arm, which sort of locked the whole frame in place and made it all feel a little stiffer.

kamloopsal: According to the instructions you give the bottle a little squeeze before setting off, the oil then sits in the tube. As you ride the oil in the tubes falls to the delivery guides (cable/zip ties cut to size) and feeds oil onto the sprocket at the nine O clock position, this is then spread centrifugally to the chain. It is a total loss system but then so is the wax I've been using, and its a pain in the neck cleaning the old wax off. :)

I guess the acid test is estimating the size of squeeze to the length of journey, in addition to ground conditions, (dust, mud, tarmac). The idea is that you don’t leave too much oil in the tube because when you park; it will continue to drip out, as opposed to being spread round the sprocket. This I think is the only real drawback of the system. At first I will use a minimal squeeze on a known journey and see how wet the chain is at the other end and then just guestimate from there on. :?

I clean the bike frequently and have made a note to self to leave a pump up garden spray with clean water and a long pan brush with some detergent out in my little instant maintenance niche, to ensure that any build up is dealt with before it fouls the tires or brakes.

If this system works then I won’t need the next option which is the Scottoiler. Which means I don’t need to connect to vacuum tubes and the like and of course the Scottoiler is four time the price for the basic kit and doesn’t oil both sides of the chain unless you buy the double head as an extra.
:D

And all before i've my Shredded Wheat. ttfn chaps
 

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It only takes one very tiny squeeze for an all day trip.

I also found that in Texas heat, the bottle would be too well sealed, and the increasing air pressure inside the bottle would continue to squeeze oil out. I learned to loosen the top about mid-day. The instructions have a suggestion for poking a hole in a specific part of the tubing with a needle if you get this kind of issue. I haven't bothered, as (1) my tips are currently chewed off and (2) the top loosening is easy and seemed to work.
 

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Will it be affected by pressure increase/decrease? Specifically, altitude changes?

That's one thing that concerns me about the Loobman, I ride in an altitude range of 6k to 12k feet and sometimes 14k ft (roughly 1800 to 4200 meters for you.) It seems that by the time I got to the top of the pass, I would be out of oil and my bike would be a mess.

I don't know that for fact it just seems like that's what would happen with what I know about how it's designed.

Feel free to educate me.
 

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Vstromper said:
Will it be affected by pressure increase/decrease? Specifically, altitude changes?

That's one thing that concerns me about the Loobman, I ride in an altitude range of 6k to 12k feet and sometimes 14k ft (roughly 1800 to 4200 meters for you.) It seems that by the time I got to the top of the pass, I would be out of oil and my bike would be a mess.

I don't know that for fact it just seems like that's what would happen with what I know about how it's designed.

Feel free to educate me.
The Loobman instructions tell you that in these conditions or if you ride with a large temperature swing frequently then you should put a tiny hole in the hose just inside the bottle. This will allow the air pressure to equalize in the bottle instead of forcing the oil out.

If you put that hole in, you should not lose all the oil.

I believe the recommendation is to use a needle that is heated red hot to make the pin hole small enough to let air through but not lose all the oil when you squeeze the bottle.
 
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kamloopsal said:
mokusbajusz - we're waiting!
I hope it's not an enclosed chain case with an oil bath? Wait a minute, it worked well on old CZs (or was that MZs?).

Al
MZ's. Ah, the eternal beauty of them. Oops, wrong thread. I had Loobmans for about eight years on my bikes now, I just refuse to pay XXX for a Scottoiler, and their XXXXXXX expensive oil when I can get by on a Loobman and gearoil. Never replaced a chain and sprcokets yet!
 
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Initial ride

It all seems good so far, the chain has a nice wet/damp feel to it as opposed to feeling claggy and greasy (as it did with the wax). It looks cleaner than when I cleaned it (though I might be wearing a rose tinted visor). There is a spot on the top of the swing arm where it joins the chassis that forms a well that has (clean) residue on it, but it will clean up easy enough. I did notice the chain had a lot more individual grains of dirt/sand, I pondered this for while and decided that it must be the last bits I picked up as I turned into my road and onto the drive as opposed to an amalgamated mass of wax and dust.

The oil tips appeared absolutely fine, and I had a feel for movement or give in the bracket and again its all firm. I was doing a steady 90mph on the way home Friday (Well lit very empty M25).

There is an amount of spatter on the rim, and the actual head gets covered in grot, though some of this may be residue wax (from those impossible to reach places between the links) that has been softened by oil and thrown (it was a lump and it fell of when poked).

Apart from these observations, I think its mission accomplished. The Chain is oiled (and looks it) and from now on chain cleaning will involve “Muck Off” and my trusty pump up garden spray. No more squatting and backache, no more abraded knuckles, and no more £8.99 (I think $16) chainwax. The dual feed head means, no more twatting around, trying to get the wax on both sides of the chain evenly, and of course the inevitable spraying wax where you don’t want it, such as the driveway, all over the inside of the chain guard, and all over the spokes and hubs or best over yourself.

All good, now i'm going to make salad for her Ladyships birthday BBQ and try and forgive myself for being such a Chain lube nerd.

Ttfn chaps
 

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Hi All, I just ordered a loobman today so it's good to check out your fitment, thanks for posting this. I'm hoping to hide the bottle somewhere but will wait 'till I get the kit, this could take a week or so as things seem to take a while to get to Australia. There is a hole in the underside of the swing arm, I was thinking that I may be able to tap a thread in this and use a SS bolt and flat washer to hold the dangley thing that distributes the oil, I guess I'll have to wait and see.
 

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I had a loobman on my V-Strom when I bought it. Seemed to work OK, but I didn't like the oil it left on the garage floor, and I always forgot to give it a squeeze. I took it off just last night and fitted a ProOiler which I had on my Triumph Sprint ST.

Pro-Oiler - great bit of kit, and works well. Obviously more $$$$ than the loobman though, but worth it IMHO.

Nigel.
 
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Guesstimating the oil squeeze

So far all well and good, the Oiler works really well, the chain is nicely wet. I have found the 3 inches of oil in the tube for most trips is enough, not all of this falls because of capillary attraction. The chain is clean, the spatter is even and if you incorporate the trap (see instructions) in the tube you can slow the feed to a tiny trickle.

If your going on a short journey there is no need to squeeze the bottle. Its better to allow the oil to be sloughed off and then give it a gentle squeeze if your going to do a reasonable amount of miles (40 or so).

Obviously if your in dusty conditions you should use it more often, but for road use (most of my trips) then less is more.

I have a tiny oil spot on the drive from my first over eager squeezing, however the faithfull "Mild Green Fairy Liquid" and the pump up plant spray ensure that all is clean and the drive doesn't look Pikey.

All things being equal I'm very happy with the Loobman.
 

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I installed my Loobman this evening. I wanted to mount the bottle where I could easily reach it while seated on the bike. Also, I wanted to keep the bent-wire bracket hidden on the inside and bottom of the swingarm.

Here's a few shots I took when I was done. The tube routing might need adjusted...it's not quite down-hill the whole way, but it seems to work.




 

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fogllama said:
You are cruel, sir. Cruel. I need close up photos of the wire before mounting. I fully admit to my inadequacy in wire-bending-planning.
:) Sorry about that. I will try to get some shots showing the wire.
 

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Ok, fogllama, I tried to take a pic of the wire from the other side. You can kind of see what I did...and I'll do my best to describe it.

The idea is to form three mounting points, like a tripod, to give it stability in all directions. The first mounting point should be as close to the delivery head as possible. So from the head, I made a quick 90 degree bend over to the inside of the swingarm, then a bend towards the front of the bike. This makes the first point. From there, I made a slight bend down to the bottom of the swingarm. Three 90 degree bends (forming a "U") makes the second point on the bottom of the swingarm. Then bends running part way up and towards the rear make the third point. An unplanned advantage of this was that the second and third mounting points are secured by the same zip-tie, so I only needed two.



I had to re-route my delivery tube, as it had a slight up-hill section soon after the bottle. (which kind of screws up the concept of a gravity-feed system :wink: ). Now the tube has a short level section before it descends towards the back, but it works perfectly. I can squeeze just a small amount of oil into the feed tube, and it all slowly makes it's way to the delivery head.

 
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