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I just purchased a set of d106 dryspec bags and I have received some feed back in regards to them being top heavy. if I could get some detailed explanations that would be great . My plan is to load the heavy items in the large bag on the seat and light gear in the other bags- rain gear , tools, repair kits ,snacks and water ,ect
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Load it up to max +5% and go for a day ride. It will tell you.
The only thing that might bug you is having to re-tighten the straps as all the soft things get pounded smaller over the course of each/every day.
As regards the center of gravity thing: Not as big a deal as some will say. You just end up making the same adjustments as one does when carrying a rookie passenger.
 

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I am going to disagree a little with NVDucati. Keep the weight low. I do not even run a top case, unless I need the capacity on long trips, then I put a dry bag on my seat. I run panniers and put all my weight on the bottom.

I never get used to the change in handling when hauling passengers, I just accept it.
 

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Always pack the weight low, but that goes for literally any luggage setup. You will never pack as much weight as a passenger so the bike is designed to have more than that much additional weight on the back. If you are solo I would suggest you move it up forward a bit onto the passenger seat.

On-road it really won't be a big deal. You will feel it but you will just subconsciously compensate.

On trails and any technical off roading you would notice more of a difference vs. conventional panniers but again depending on how much weight the impact can vary a lot.

You will probably be perfectly fine with that setup and you will just naturally compensate your riding.
 

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More than the CG being high, the issue I see with that setup is the two bags sitting out in the wind as high as they are. Those things are going to catch a lot of air, often bad air from trucks and crosswinds, and sitting where they are it seems likely the stability of your bike will be greatly influenced.
 

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"Low" and "forward"are your words for today, and dress rehearsals are highly recommended. Learn the best way to load the bags, and attach them to the bike, and how the bike handles with different configurations & center of gravity. You'll be glad you did when setting out in the rain. And the dark.

I took a motorcycle trip from Wisconsin to coastal Addison, Maine on my '76 Honda CB 500. My "luggage" was a frame-type rucksack bungied to the sissybar (yup, footpegs on the crashbars, too) and tent, sleeping bag, and a compression sack bungied to the rucksack and seat. so the only weight below the seat was my legs. Crosswinds were exciting, and steering was light, like with a passenger. One thing I did do right was take a 40 mile round trip overnight before the big trip. Found out how to pack more efficiently and bought a bunch more bungie cords.
 
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