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Hello Everyone:

As I am new to this bike, is their a common list of tools or spare parts that are normally recommended be carried at all times ?

I did purchase the factory service manual for my new to me 2009 650 with less than 19K.

Thank You
 

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That list can vary depending on need and personality. Some guys carry way to many tools for North America, while others just use the oem tool kit provided. I do a little of both, deleting some useless oem tools and adding my own.

-a set of metric allen's
-2 Motion Pro aluminium tire Spoons(spoon on one end, metric box wrench of your choice on the other...one of mine of is for the large rear axle nut)
-a compact metric ratchet set and sockets
-assortment of metric wrenches
-tire plug kit
-small compressor
-small roll ea of Gorilla tape and safety wire
-I always wear on my belt a Leartherman ChargeTTi including two complete bit sets(absolute lifesaver more than once)

Most go in a tool tube mounted behind the oem rack on the left side, the rest under the seat.
 

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Hello Everyone:

As I am new to this bike, is their a common list of tools or spare parts that are normally recommended be carried at all times ?

I did purchase the factory service manual for my new to me 2009 650 with less than 19K.

Thank You

You want to prepare for the most likely event first, a flat tire. Get a string plug kit and a small compressor that you connect to the battery. You can't use the dash outlet for the compressor it will blow that fuse. Know how to fix the tire, watch vids practice on an old tire if you can.

You don't need or want to remove a wheel to fix a tire. There isn't a need anyway (with tubeless tires) unless you destroyed the sidewall but then you would need a new tire.

Outside of a flat there isn't much need to carry tools really. Unless you are going on long trips and expect to change oil or sumpthin' modern bikes are very reliable, a Strom exceptionally so. The OEM kit has the minimal tools needed to tighten up a mirror or a loose license plate bolt, stuff like that. Throw a few fuses in, some tape, tie wraps, etc. the kind of things to get you back to civilization.

A lot of people will posts lists of extensive tool kits expecting to be prepared for most anything or wanting to help other less prepared riders. Good on them but reality is (in a first world country anyway) you aren't stranded with a broken down bike. Not that it's likely to happen these days.
 

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if you type 'tool kit' in the google custom search box you will see all the past threads/posts re this topic.
 

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I agree with Spec. There just isn't much you can do if your bike acts up on the road or trail. Things like axles and bars should not come loose unless you didn't properly tightan them. Engine problems are pretty much unheard of on the road unles it is a major component that you can't repair anyway. Tires are the main concern. I'd agree, a tire repair kit, compressor, some tape in case your backpack strap breaks, maybe a bit of wire for that strange thing you don't expect. A couple of fuses and a flashlight might bei good; cell phone charger.
 

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I agree I would keep it basic for local/Canada/US. I carry a small voltmeter for basic electrical troubleshooting.
 

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Agree on a tire plugging and reinflation solution.
I wouldn't go on a long tour on a chain drive bike without a tool to loosen the rear axle, to allow for chain adjustments. I don't think there is anything in the tool kit that will actually work.

I don't worry about bringing a bunch of extra tools, beyond that. However, I do pack a few things under the seat:

A roll of electrical tape.
A wad of duct tape (take off roll and re-roll smaller).
A pair of needle-nose pliers (useful for all manner of things).
A length of stainless steel lockwire - can be used in a pinch for many things, plus unlike most tape it will stand up to heat.
And, of course, on a chain drive bike I bring chain lube with me on any tour.
 

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TOOL#1: Cell phone & charger. Having tow service on your insurance or AMA membership or other motor clubs will get you to where you can get repairs done, or get the bike back to your home. Most smartphones have a flashlight app.
TOOL#2: The factory tool kit is adequate to fix anything that can be fixed on the road during a commute or errand running; be careful not to hog out Allen heads or round off nuts. If you do, see tool #1.
TOOLS 3 AND UP: a roll of electrical tape to use as duct tape (it packs smaller) for those things that are hanging or broken off. A few zip-ties fit in the factory toolkit as well. The toolkit tools I consider emergency use only. If you are planning to do your own regular maintenance and light repair work, then invest in better tools. And remember, you get what you pay for; I'd stay away from the 101-piece tool set for $19.95 bargains.
FLAT TIRES I personally stay away from products such as Slime, as I've had it seal up the Schraeder valve along with the leak! A tire repair kit is good peace of mind and a $35 electric inflator packs small. Also handy if you've bled out 10-12 lb of air for offroad riding. Also an air gauge; dial type are usually the most accurate
For epic cross country adventures there are many guides and articles online dealing with what to pack for tools and other gear.
 

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I am one of the "some guys carry way to many tools for North America" guys Motor7 is referring to.

I carry a small air compressor (Slime) and jumper cables under the seat. The string or rope tire plug kit in the left side case. Spare fuses, tire gauge, small metric hex key set, and electrical tape are in the tank bag. And of course, a credit card and cell phone. These are always with me.

In my tool pouches, which I carry on extended trips and over-nighters in the side cases, are:

pliers
pliers - needle nose
wire cutters
tire irons w/22mm wrench
tire irons w/24mm wrench
3/8" socket ratchet
3/8" breaker bar
3/8" extension - 10"
3/8" extension - 6"
3/8" extension - 3"
3/8" extension - 1.5"
JIS screwdriver - No. 1
JIS screwdriver - No. 2
JIS screwdriver - No. 0
JIS screwdriver - No. 00
screwdriver - flat 1/4"
screwdriver - flat 1/8"
screwdriver - Torx 25
screwdriver - Phillips #1
17mm combination wrench
14mm combination wrench
13mm combination wrench
12mm combination wrench
11mm combination wrench
10mm combination wrench
8mm combination wrench
5/8" spark plug socket - 3/8" drive
flex joint - 3/8" drive
12mm hex socket - 3/8" drive
10mm hex socket - 3/8" drive
8mm hex socket - 3/8" drive
6mm hex socket - 3/8" drive
5mm hex socket - 3/8" drive
4mm hex socket - 3/8" drive
24mm socket - 1/2" drive
1/2" to 3/8" drive adapter
22mm socket - 3/8" drive
17mm socket - 3/8" drive
14mm socket - 3/8" drive
13mm socket - 3/8" drive
12mm socket - 3/8" drive
10mm socket - 3/8" drive
6mm socket - 3/8" drive
electical tape
12" cheater bar


However, in all my travels since 2006, which included twelve extended trips (ranging from 3600 to 4900 miles each over two-four weeks), I have only used electrical tape and four tools: pliers, 10mm combo, 8mm combo, and a 2.5mm hex key. The pliers and 10mm to tight up the shift linkage adjuster that came loose and the 8mm to tighten the right mirror bolts. Electrical tape to fix a turn signal when I got too close to a bridge's frame work and another time when I got too close to the ground. And the 2.5mm hex key to tighten up a MRA X-Creen spoiler that loosened up on some rough roads looking for the Revenant.

Ya, I know. I have been meaning to pare that down but, well, just haven't gotten around to it. Easier to carry, then you know it's there.

Hopefully, the good fortune will continue.
 

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Most of the tools I carry have been of some help to others. The Wee has been faultless. I got a slime pump and took it it out of its case and carry it under the seat.
Don't bother with tools that you don't know how to use. The tools I carry are mostly wrenches I inherited, Stahlwille. Thin, lightweight and accurate. And they are close to 50 years old now.
The sockets are Sears stuff. You can find odd ball sets occasionally the are quite functional. I carry a length of copper tube for added torque when tightening on a 3/8th ratchet.
The worm plugs are nice and work but get new set occasionally cus they dry up. They all fit in a bag in my 4" tool tube nicely with a length of tubing for syphoning gas in emergency. The factory set languishes under seat tool. I have a set of Allen wrenches i won in the top box.
 

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If I were going very far from home I would carry my lithium battery jump starter. Sizes for bikes and smaller car engines are not much bigger than a cell phone, not including the cables. The bike may be flawless, but user error could cause a dead battery...like turning the key too far when you lock the bars. And batteries sometimes just die unexpectedly.
 

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Stalky's list is very good. I carry most of that.

On my WEE I also had a spare clutch cable. If it breaks you also need an 8mm deep socket to get the cover off. Make sure what tool you have can reach there and get the job done. A broken clutch cable can get you stranded big time and they are not in stock at most places you may want to order them from!

Other than that, some electrical cable, some positraps, wire to tie up anything that may come off, a bunch of zip ties, JB Weld, kneed epoxy and that magical self welding PVC tape, that can even plug a radiator hose.

Nealy tire repair kit, the best! Make sure your pigtail, if that is how you power your compressor, has at least a 15A fuse or else you will blow the 5A fuse when filling the tire. On our trips the most problems we had on many thousand miles were tire issues. I now also have tire pressure monitors. I had so many punctures and a blowout, statistically I should never again see a tire failure, but who knows. Not fun if you can't fix the tire or if it's ruined and you are several hundred miles out from the next town!
 

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Keep it simple

I'm with the minimalist school - it all has to fit under the seat or it doesn't go, and that includes my waterproof pants. So I carry the OEM toolkit, tyre plug kit, bicycle pump (slow but sure, because I once used a compressor and got a flat battery), duct tape, cable ties and tie wire. This combination has fixed things from loose mirrors to snapped off footpeg and blinkers, broken pannier mounts, cracked fairing - all the ills that flesh is heir to.

I have never had a mechanical problem that left me stranded so I don't bother with the torque wrench, maintenance lift, cylinder hones or spare front cylinder head etc that some people carry. Don't laugh, I once met a guy crossing the Nullabor on a postie bike who had a spare head in his luggage but then that is not a Strom :)

BTW you don't need to carry jumper leads. Just take the fully charged battery out of your friend's bike, carry it over to yours and use a couple of spanners to bridge the terminals (suggest you keep your gloves on for this).
 

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CruzTools makes an RTM3 Roadtech Metric Toolkit that is compact and has the essentials. I started with something like that to get an idea of what to carry, but just built a similar kit using full sized tools.

The Stalky list is excellent! I carry most of this but I need to add the socket extensions, breaker bar, and set of dedicated screwdrivers (instead of a universal one with interchangeable bits; it's not a good form factor for getting in a tight space).

Tubeless tire Patch Kit, Cycle Pump, Optimate Battery Tender

There is a school of thought that says to work on your bike at home using only the tools you carry, so you'll have what you need if you run into issues.
 

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I haven't seen it mentioned, but I carry a pair of medium size Vise-Grips. I have the needle-nose style but regular works, too. Besides using to turn a stubborn bolt (or stripped head), they can be used to temporarily repair a broken hand or foot lever.
 

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I'm another of the "carry's too many tools". In addition to the stock Suzuki tool pouch any wrench, socket, Allen wrench, screw driver, or plier I've used to work on any motorcycle is in one of the two tool bags I carry on long trips, plus a torque wrench, three tire irons, an extensive tire plug and patch kit, air pump, multimeter, an assortment of zip ties, hose clamps, wire, nuts/bolts/screws, electrical tape, cotter pins, small wire brush, Loctite blue, anti-seize, chain lube, WD-40, ratchet straps, and some spare bulbs.

What repairs have I done to my own bikes on the road? Plugged tubeless tires, replaced rear brake pads, adjusted the chain, disassembled and repaired a failed light switch. Numerous times I've helped others who carried no tools or had no clue how to do what they needed to get back on the road.

I like having tools available. On long trips the tool bags weigh about 30 pounds and ride low and forward in fabric saddle bags hung from the engine crash bars. Those bags have flat tops and double as leg rests too so I don't have highway pegs on the bike.

JathkaJoe
 
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