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Discussion Starter #1
So I fired up my bike this morning, rode the 44 miles to work in the 40 degree cold. Anyway I noticed upon hard acceleration the bike was bogging pretty bad so I assumed something was wrong with the fuel system, upon arriving to work the second I shut the bike off, the low volt warning on my radar detector started blaring. and when I looked down the dash didn't even have enough juice to light up, hit the starter.... nothing, headlights were dim etc etc etc.

So the question now is... Did the battery somehow go bad on my 40 mile journey or is the alternator, voltage regulator, or wiring to blame?

I mean I am prone to believe the alternator is working since I didn't get completely stranded over the hour ride, but the bogging may suggest that it has diminished output?


I know the way to really get to the bottom of this is to test the alternator output, and test the resistance between the windings to see if there's a short, but I'm kind of stranded at work and looking for a quick and dirty diagnosis.
 

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If you have the original battery, I would start with a test or replacement of that. A battery can go bad without warning- one day it's perfectly fine and the next day, nothing doing. A bad battery can refuse charging.
 

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I know the way to really get to the bottom of this is to test the alternator output, and test the resistance between the windings to see if there's a short, but I'm kind of stranded at work and looking for a quick and dirty diagnosis.
No need to go that far... somehow get the bike up and running (boost from someone), then check the voltage across the battery terminals... If the stator and recifier are working correctly it should read above 13.5Vs at idle... This way you will know if it's the battery or not..
 

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When the same thing happened to my brother's BMW, we bungied a car battery to the luggage rack, wired it up and pulled the headlight connectors. That got it home from over 100 miles away. His problem was the battery. Testing the output of a bad battery can yield lower test voltages on a charging system that works fine depending on the battery problem. A battery with an internal short can be a real problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
oh i forgot to mention, I was really taxing the battery this morning, I had my tourmaster synergy vest, and chaps plugged in and turned up full blast, and I do have 55w HID monster headlights.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
my radar detector has a voltage monitoring mode, I can just view the voltage that way.
 

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That was a big "forgot to mention". All that stuff is more than the 375W system can support. You need to be looking at that voltmeter while riding and keeping up at least 12.6-12.8V.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
ive ridden with it all before for long distances without issue, but i'm wondering if a aging battery could put it over the edge.
 

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Nearest Walmart would have

a cheap battery and a cheap Voltmeter

If she ain't making electricity it can't get you home
 

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What was it? Bad battery, too much load, combination? Inquiring minds want to know!,
 

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Discussion Starter #13
too much load. I jumped it, rode it from bakersfield to riverside (160 miles) with the gear set to medium instead of high and all was well with the world. think I may set up a kill switch for one of the headlights to get the necessary watts when it's below 40 degrees outside.
 
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too much load. I jumped it, rode it from ....... think I may set up a kill switch for one of the headlights to get the necessary watts when it's below 40 degrees outside.
If it's only 40 degrees you may want to skip the electric heat and just embrace the fresh air.(Those guys up north are still wearing shorts and tee shirts until it's almost -25)
You probably don't need it if the ride is under two or three hours.
Save the heat for when it really counts (snow storm or 12,000 foot pass)
Just a thought anyhow.
 

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Skip the heat when it's in the 40s? Shit...down here we'd have the heated gear going when it gets into the low 70s.
 

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If it's only 40 degrees you may want to skip the electric heat and just embrace the fresh air.(Those guys up north are still wearing shorts and tee shirts until it's almost -25)
You probably don't need it if the ride is under two or three hours.
Save the heat for when it really counts (snow storm or 12,000 foot pass)
Just a thought anyhow.
+1!!

I don't have heated gear at all & have ridden WELL into the 20's. Ice, or threat there of, will keep me off the road. That's about it. Cold.....NOPE!!
 

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If it's only 40 degrees you may want to skip the electric heat and just embrace the fresh air.(Those guys up north are still wearing shorts and tee shirts until it's almost -25)
You probably don't need it if the ride is under two or three hours.
Save the heat for when it really counts (snow storm or 12,000 foot pass)
Just a thought anyhow.
Why? Either the bike can handle it, or it can't. If it can handle it, then run the heated gear whenever you want, If it can't handle it, why would you want to go out in freezing weather relying on it to keep you warm?

I say, install a good voltmeter like a Datel, put whatever provisions in place that you need (like a headlight cutoff) and then run the heated gear whenever you feel like it. It was a very windy 50 yesterday out on Hwy 1 on the coast, and I was loving every second that my Gerbing was pumping out heated goodness.
 

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Easiest switch in the world.

You do not need a switch to turn off one headlight.

Simply reach in and pull the plug. If you want to have
high beam available, turn the plug 180º and plug it in,
and that headlight will run on high beam only.

If you turn it 90º one way, it will run at low intensity on low beam,
with both the filaments in series. I don't recommend this, but it
does no harm to anything. If you turn it 90º the other way,
it never comes on.

I hope you have made sure the connections to the battery are TIGHT!
A little bit of looseness causes a voltage drop there, which causes heat,
which causes corrosion, which causes more looseness, and in a few
seconds or hours, you can have a fine little fire, just under yer gonads.

As Jerry Lee Lewis, said, "Goodness Gracious, Great Balls of Fire!" :green_lol:

Keith
 

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If it's only 40 degrees you may want to skip the electric heat and just embrace the fresh air.(Those guys up north are still wearing shorts and tee shirts until it's almost -25)
You probably don't need it if the ride is under two or three hours.
Save the heat for when it really counts (snow storm or 12,000 foot pass)
Just a thought anyhow.
You hauled in some whoppers with that one - err, except for nerf - but 30 second rides at 5 mph don't count..
I'm envious.
 
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