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We put LED's in our 2012 DL650's and while they were brighter during the day we found that they didn't perform that well at night.
They would light up signs etc but the road seemed to miss out.
We haven't bothered with the 2014 DL1000 as with the cree lights that we use as DRL's and are hooked up to come on full power with the high beam we don't feel there is a need to change the standard globes.

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks V2man
do you find the 650 laking in lighting the road of a night as I do? or is it just me.
 

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They have some of the better lights around, you could try changing to a better quality bulb.
We run these as DRL's which help at night on low beam, hooked up to go to full power with high beam and they REALLY light things up.

https://2allbuyer.com/3000LM-Cree-Led-Light-x2-P3121582.aspx

Heres a video we did when we first got the Cree LED's, it not the best but will give you and idea of how bright they are


You can see them on the bike just below the blinkers, not overly large but they work



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Yeah, I have a set on my 2014 DL1000 that perform exceptionally well. The H7 low beam has a knife edge cutoff which is unusual for LED's. The H9 high also works well but that isn't as critical as it should be off when there's oncoming traffic. In both cases I had to adjust the lights down quite a bit.

So far they havn't annoyed the cops and I did see a rider pulled over today and I think it was for lights - could have been the purple tinge to his though. There's always someone pushes the limits, point being though the same cop just gave me a nod as I rode past.

I could never find H4's for the 650 which were more use than grief. That may have changed but H4 is much harder to do as the two sets of LED's have to be in exactly the right places to work.

The early comment is correct, badly adjusted LED's just leave you blinded from road signs and though bright don't actually improve how far you can see after dark. Mine are actually a lot better than stock and good for far higher speeds than I'd risk around here at night.

Just be aware they are not exactly legal either in a lot of places where aux lights switched with high beam usually are.
 

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not sure if your interest in LED headlights is specific to Australia/New Zealand due to laws, but I learned a few things about LED headlights when I switched over (here in the US east coast). I have had LEDs on my '08 Vee for about 4 years now. I like that they are bright and white -- both in being seen and in seeing. But I do not like the immense scatter of light from an LED bulb. Since the canister holding the headlight was built for a regular bulb and built to direct/aim that light, the LED scatter of light is not directed like the OEM bulb was. I searched long and hard for a plug 'n play LED bulb that had a flat cutoff so as not to blind oncoming drivers. I found a set but had to crank the adjuster to its full limit so the cutoff line on the LED was showing up where it was for the OEM bulbs. With all the time and miles I have had on these LED headlights, I can remember only one driver turning his highbeams on coming at me. One out of thousands. Even police haven't bothered me. My local inspection station is OK with them. But due to the scatter not be directed the way I really wanted, I added LED driving lights and hung one off each side of the handlebars. I've had these on the bike for over 2 years now. These are significantly brighter and the light is directed much better since they are made as LED lights and not an LED bulb replacing an incandescent bulb. I have the driving lights set at 10% and they are as bright as my headlight LEDs on low beam. Rather than run the driving lights through the highbeam switch, I have an aux switch that will just take them to 100% power when I turn the switch. I use the driving lights at 100% as my highbeams, but never when there is on-coming traffic. So, I like the LED headlights but they just don't have the down range distance I would like. I think that is due simply to the canister being made to direct the light from the OEM incandescent bulb and not an LED replacement bulb. Between the LED headlights and the LED driving lights, I get the distance, brightness and coverage that I like for night riding.



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Discussion Starter #7
thanks Yarz1
good feed back on the two types of LED installations. the reason for LED lights is that the original lights are too dim. in suburbia I find it difficult to see the road in front especially if there is on coming traffic with bright head lights. My suburban roads have quite a few holes and uneven sections as well as the occasional debri from trees.
V2
quick question with the Cree lights- they appear to be like a driving light so do they have a high and low beam or are they just on or off and you manually adjust the angle to deliver light to the distance or close up. also do they come with clear instruction on the installation so that a novice can install? ok sorry it was two questions. the video and the photos seem to show the light levels I am after.
thanks again to everyone for the responses it has been very helpful.
 

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I have no idea about Cree lights - but I do have Clearwater Lights on my bike.

They have a dimmer which will go to 85% of their full brightness (too bright for normal evening driving).

When you turn on your high beams, they go to 100% of their brightness.

I ussually run them at about 75% during the day, 50% during the night and when I go high beams ... it's nice.

Coincidentally - When I lost a headlight, I just turned them up a bit - and rode home. The Suzuki bulb does very little when you have quality, white light!

(They aren't cheap, but they are NICE)

Scott
 

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Clearwater use Cree chips in their products.
Every year the LED bulbs on sale are replaced by a better design. For motorcycles it is best to choose a design that breaks apart in the middle (so that you can install the H4 bulb disc first, then your bikes rubber weatherseal, and then the bulb itself).
Rather than fit auxiliary lights I just replaced my OEM bulbs. My first LED's years ago scattered light but I now have these: https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/H4-9003-HB2-Cree-Led-headlight-bulb-kit-80W-9600LM-Hi-Lo-beam-6000k-white/222806177420?hash=item33e048768c:g:43kAAOSwvqFc0~xs Note the red sealing ring where the H4 disc can be twisted and removed from the bulb.

The colour temperature is also important. 4800k bulbs are very white in comparison with the distinctly blue tinted 6000-6500k bulbs.

As incandescent bulbs age their beam becomes ever greyer. LEDs remain bright throughout their lifetime. Usually 50,000 hours. That is 8 hours a day, every day, for 17.6 years. In my experience the beam is great and on low clearly lights all of the road in front, unlike an old incandescent bulb which tends to project a texture of greyer light.

Cree is the leading manufacturer of LED's and makes both SMD and the newer COB chip. https://www.solarlightsmanufacturer.com/cob-led-smd-led/
 

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Every year the LED bulbs on sale are replaced by a better design.
As incandescent bulbs age their beam becomes ever greyer. LEDs remain bright throughout their lifetime. Usually 50,000 hours.
Your first statement is true. Since most headlights today are halogen, this part of your answer needs some qualification. The halogen element (chlorine, fluorine, bromine, iodine, etc. are halogens) facilitates the redeposition of vaporized tungsten from the filament back onto the filament instead of the inside of the glass envelope in a standard incandescent lamp. This keeps halogen lamps burning more brightly as they age than standard incandescent lamps. LED's on the other hand, lose about 1 to 3% of their brightness per year (I'm not sure what hours the mfr's use here to denote a year) but they are not perfect...yet. LED's certainly outperform any incandescent/halogen lamp today, and unless you have an early failure, will probably last until you replace the bike with another. LED's currently emit between 90 and 100 lumens per watt. If a manufacturer's claims exceed those numbers significantly, they are probably inflating their claims like amplifier makers of old. More of anything sells better.

If your bike uses H4 lamps, go with the F2 LED. Read this on the ST-owners website. The author is/was a lighting engineer and helped develop the LED H4 lamp. In fact, if you have the time and want the knowledge, search for Spiderman302 on that website and read all his posts. He is a pretty impressive guy.

For now, go to the link above (Read This) and choose page 17 - watch the video in post #331. While this guy is pushing his own brand - the V4 - it is still the F2 LED lamp that is currently the best out there, and beam patterns don't lie. What he is saying about each example is an education in and of itself.
If you buy it from Evitek (China). it usually takes 2 to 3 weeks to get to the recipient, it will probably be the cheapest price you will find, and as mentioned in those posts, the woman who takes the orders is Cindy. Her English is not perfect, but very good. I've bought two sets from them and have been v. happy with them - on my ST and V Strom.
 
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