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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
As mentioned in another thread, I ordered and have now received a studded 205/50R17 General Altimax Arctic XL car snow tire, and I plan to mount in on my 2012 DL650A this weekend. This is your chance to save me from wasting a bunch of time, trying to mount this thing myself and discovering it doesn't fit.

My two big concerns at this point are:

1. Most of what I've read about this tire has been from @randyo and I believe he was running an older DL1000. But I have also been given the impression that the amount of clearance from tire to chain was the same in the 650. Can anyone confirm for sure that this is, or is not, true? Does anyone know if there were changes versus the pre-2012 bikes that would cause reduced clearance on a 2012?

(Or, more simply, does anyone know for sure either way whether this tire will fit my bike?)

2. Concern #2 is something randyo mentioned in passing: that his tire guy didn't want to swap the car tire back to a bike tire unless he replaced the wheel. Since this is just for winter (10 miles daily commute on surface roads), I definitely want to swap back in March. Does anyone know if that is a typical problem with car tires? I definitely can't afford a new wheel for this experiment.

I appreciate any specific knowledge that might be floating around out there.
 

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Subscribed. If it works reasonably well it may be the choice for LD touring.

BTW if you ok at the footage rally guys running snow tires on their cars at WRC level for grip at expense of longevity. Well longevity shouldn't be an issue on 500lbs bike

Sent from my K01A using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well, I have tried and failed for two weekends to get this darn snow tire on the rim myself. Weekend #1, wheel off bike, existing tire off rim, new tire...not even close to getting on. Weekend #2, was excited to try the zip tie method. Got some super thick and long zip ties. But I couldn't squish the tire enough to bring the edges close together. I used a c-clamp and smooshed it as much as I could before securing the zip tie. The zip ties helped some, but in the end I couldn't get the final 1/4 of the circumference of the tire over the rim.

Again I am spending the first days of the week at the office all sore from the effort.

But every time I'm about to give up, another possibility emerges to taunt me for one more week. In this case, an installer has appeared in the Darkside website installer database, a few towns away from me! I don't know if I just missed it before, or if they are new, but I'm going to get over there this week and will report back.

My other fail was: I got a Shinko knobby for the front and brought it to a guy who studs tires. Or did, up until THE DAY BEFORE when they threw out all their machines, after decades of doing it!! That's just the luck I've been having with this project so far. Good times.
 

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How are you trying to mount the tire? What equipment are you using?
 

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I am lucky enuf that I have a good enuf relationship with my dealer, that they installed my tire with their tire machine (and had a hard time, hence the reason the didn't want to me mounting and dismounting it seasonally)

on the Darksiders forum, some guys use ratchet straps to pinch their beads

maybe use a ratchet strap to get the beads touching, then put a zip tie to keep it there, move the ratchet strap, add another zip tie till ya got 9 or 10 of em around the tire

best advice I have is to watch some youtube tire mounting videos
 

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Discussion Starter #6
@Spec I have two metal spoons, rim protectors, an 8" c-clamp, and a bottle of windex. I'm sitting the new tire on the old one to protect the rotor.
@OydnaR: ratchet strap, eh? Good idea, I'm going to try that if I can't get that garage to do it. And thanks for the explanation on dismounting! Yeah, I've watched a bunch of videos, and I had a much easier time dismounting the existing tire as a result. But this big wide snow tire has just been kicking my butt. Did you see the tire I'm using (205/50R17 General Altimax Arctic XL)? Is that the same as what you had? I've been a little nervous about the "XL" part, like that might be adding to my problems, but I didn't see a non-XL version for sale.

My biggest worry is that I'll finally get this thing on and the "XL" will somehow mean it doesn't fit. Well, that is my second biggest worry. #1 is "Having an aneurysm trying to mount this f***** thing myself".
 

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I feel your pain...I couldn't even get a rear Bridgestone mounted by hand recently, and had to cave in and take it to the shop. I almost had to commit ritual Seppuku with a tire iron in shame.

I was going to suggest small ratchet straps too, but others beat me to it. I've tried the zip tie method but it didn't make it any easier for me than a spoon; maybe the ratchet straps will allow you to pull the tire walls closer together than the zip ties.
 

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I feel your pain...I couldn't even get a rear Bridgestone mounted by hand recently, and had to cave in and take it to the shop. I almost had to commit ritual Seppuku with a tire iron in shame.
Now imagine needing to do it on the trail to replace punched tube. Makes you wonder what Honda was smoking when they decided to put TT on Africa Twin.
 

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Now imagine needing to do it on the trail to replace punched tube. Makes you wonder what Honda was smoking when they decided to put TT on Africa Twin.
Yes, but a Battlewing is a radial tubeless tire...the ones on the AT might be easier to mount since they use a tube type tire. I don't know if they have the same stiff sidewall construction.
 

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Yes, but a Battlewing is a radial tubeless tire...the ones on the AT might be easier to mount since they use a tube type tire. I don't know if they have the same stiff sidewall construction.
Depends. Some TT tires are as stiff. The softer ones are usually don't last.
 

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I think a lot of it is technique, too. I've changed Battlewings before by hand, and Shinko 705s were no problem. I think I was just having one of those days.
 

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LOL, getting a tire hot enough to change in North Carolina in August is never a problem. :smile2:
 

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Depends. Some TT tires are as stiff. The softer ones are usually don't last.

The stiffest tire I've mounted was a dirt bike rear tire that was advertised as having stiff sidewalls. Some sort of Dunlop Desert sumpthin'. Anyway they weren't kidding. It was all my son and I could do to get it on.

This was on a skinny dirt wheel not a wider dual sport wheel.

Yea good luck with a flat on the Honda AT out in the dirt somewhere.
 

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@Spec I have two metal spoons, rim protectors, an 8" c-clamp, and a bottle of windex. I'm sitting the new tire on the old one to protect the rotor...

Are you good at changing tires in general?

Can you get one side of the tire on the rim?

You understand about keeping the opposite bead down in the rim, yes? (no offense intended).

Back when I used spoons I used 3, couldn't do it with just 2.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
@Spec, hi. To answer your questions: I am very new to changing tires, and utterly terrible at it, but learning as I go. No offense will be taken to any "obvious" suggestion.

I did get one side of the tire on the rim. I am aware that the center of the rim narrows and that having the opposite bead in it is important to getting the first side on. Is there a way that principle is supposed to be used for getting the second side on? It makes sense that maybe one could make use of that using the zip-tie method because the beads would be pinched together. You could move the pinched beads on one side into the narrow center, and then both the pinched beads on the other side would go on easier? As mentioned I wasn't able to get them to pinch, but I might try again using the ratchet strap suggestion from above.

I can see how 3 spoons would be better. After about 3/4 of the way around, getting more over the lip caused an equal amount to slip back off. But so much was overhanging that even if I could control that with a 3rd spoon, I just can't see any way that last amount of overhang is going to get levered over. As it was it was taking all my strength to move a spoon-width at a time.

I really appreciate everyone helping me figure a way through this!
 

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I haven't mounted a car tire on a motorcycle rim so for what it's worth!

Keeping the tire bead down in the rim is essential. That's the "trick" to mounting tires.

You've got the tire on one side of the rim. Get the other side started and stick something like a block of wood, hard rubber, etc. into the gap to hold the tire down. Start at the point and work in one direction away from it. Small bites with the irons. As you make your way around the tire push the tire down into rim opposite of where the irons are. If it is taking a lot of force to lever the tire the opposite bead is not down far enough into the rim.

Lube up the underside of the tire bead where it contacts the rim of course.

Hope this helps!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Armed with the latest suggestions, I took one more run at mounting this thing myself yesterday. The idea about putting a block in to push the far side down into the center groove was a clear non-starter. Too stiff. And as far as using ratchet straps to pinch the beads, nothing I had seemed nearly strong enough. And the little progress I did make was only tending to bend the face of the tire in concavely, which wasn't promising. So I declared defeat.

So, this morning I took the tire and rim to [the one installer in CT in the darkside database]. I didn't call, skipped the front desk, went around back. Once it dawned on them what I brought, they began looking at me like I was crazy. "What, did someone on the internet say you could do this?" But sure enough, they started giving it a try.

One guy tried it with the machine. Not even close. Second guy with spoons + machine. Not even close. "I don't think it can be done. I don't think it can be done," one guys keeps saying. I say, "no, people on the internet have definitely done it!" Forget the machine, bring in specialty clamps, vice grip and rag, one more guy, and 4 giant spoons. It looked like open heart surgery on Optimus Prime. But sure enough a few minutes later it was on and holding air!

They couldn't balance a bike tire, so I'm going to be adding balance beads through the stem and then next step is to see if this monster fits on the bike.

Thanks everyone for your advice and tips. I feel so much more prepared for the day I have to put on a new (non-car) tire myself. Like the front tire once I get it studded!
 

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Sounds like car tires aren't meant to be mounted on motorcycle rims......imagine that. ;)
 
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Discussion Starter #20
@Big-B would you have me spend another winter commuting encased in my wife's little beige Rav4? IT IS BEIGE!!! And I'm a big guy. Of course you don't.

I do really like the idea of having a big wide heavy tire, stippled and studded, back there keeping everything on track for my 5 miles there and home. Hopefully it works and I do as well as Randy did. If not, I'm signing you up for for an I Told You So, in advance.

But I must admit, I can see why Randy's shop wasn't anxious to mount another one :)
 
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