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He says what I've read on the CHP and DMV sites . . . nothing really new. When I commute on the 10 through L.A. in the evening I usually have a 4' wide lane of my own between the #1 and #2 lanes except for those really off days when no one seems able to drive properly. It usually cuts my commute from 1:15 to about 0:40 or so.

One thing they didn't mention, splitting lanes when each lane is running at a different speed . . . don't, it's a meat grinder.
 

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One thing they didn't mention, splitting lanes when each lane is running at a different speed . . . don't, it's a meat grinder.
Very true. It gets very iffy if the density is different in the two lanes on top of speed difference.
 

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updates on CHP policy?

Has anyone seen the new advisory they've posted?
from the CHP CMSP front page (chp.ca.gov/programs/motorcycle.html):

Information regarding "lane splitting general guidelines" is no longer available.

A petitioner complained to the Office of Administrative Law that there was no formal rulemaking process for the guidelines, and raised other objections. The CHP discussed the issue with the Office of Administrative Law and chose not to issue, use or enforce guidelines and thus removed them from the website.

The underlying purpose of the guidelines was to provide common-sense traffic safety information.

California law does not allow or prohibit motorcycles from passing other vehicles proceeding in the same direction within the same lane, a practice often called "lane splitting," "lane sharing" or "filtering."
[unrelated safety tips fill out the rest of the post]
Creating a safer highway environment is the shared responsibility of drivers and motorcyclists alike. This is achieved by staying alert and using common sense and courtesy while on the road. It is also important for motorcyclists to minimize their risks by riding responsibly, always wearing a helmet and other protective gear and to never ride under the influence of alcohol or other intoxicants. Here are other important safety reminders:

Watch your speed-a motorcycle collision is highly likely to cause injury or death
Assume people in cars do not see you.
Avoid blind spots in other vehicles, particularly large trucks


The California Highway Patrol also strongly encourages all motorcycle riders to sign up for the California Motorcyclist Safety Program, which is administered by the CHP as California's official motorcycle safety and training program. The Program offers courses for new and experiences riders. Find out more about the California Motorcyclist Safety Program.
Looks to me like they've had the legality challenged; can't tell if that's because of busybodies with too much time on their hands or if there was a court case involved; neither would surprise me, and either way I can understand why the CHP is trying to backtrack and cover their asses.

It leaves us in a very confusing state, though--"...law does not prohibit or allow..." means officer discretion, which is actually not such a bad deal so long as you're not being a dick--stick to the guidelines and you shouldn't be any more likely to get a ticket than you were before.

It really helps if you know what the cops you'll be riding past think about the issue, though. I've had some success talking to local (city-level) police/county sheriff's officers about non-functioning traffic signals on my commute (left turns late at night, you know the drill), but CHP's phone people were pretty evasive about any and all questions that had anything to do with policy (on that issue, anyhow.) Anyone know another good way to meet CHP officers in a specific area and ask questions?
 

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"...law does not prohibit or allow..."
Which to any law abiding common sense citizen should mean it's legal. Do we need a law to tell us to breathe?
 

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Which to any law abiding common sense citizen should mean it's legal. Do we need a law to tell us to breathe?
I just came across this thread, v. interesting as I live in LA and commute on some of the densest freeways in the universe, and have put many miles on the white line.

Having followed how the CHP issued and pulled their guidelines, it should be clarified that CA has *no* legislation on the books regarding lane-splitting. There is in fact no state which has a law that makes it legal, but there are many that make it illegal.

Best summary of this is from a fresh online article from the American Motorcycle Association: "While not specifically permitted or prohibited in the California Vehicle Code, lane splitting authority comes from the California Highway Patrol. " What that means is that it's up to the chippies to judge if the act is being done "... under which a motorcyclist might be cited for unsafe or imprudent behavior...". So it is condoned but discretionary on the part of the enforcement of laws covering reckless driving. [When I'm lucky I can hop in behind a CHP motorcop splitting through slow traffic.]

That authority doesn't extend to lane splitting on surface streets while moving or pulling up to stop-lights. I've split at stop-lights countless times, often right in view of the local lawmen. The reason to do this at stop-lights is the same as on freeways with slow moving traffic, to reduce the chance of rear-end collision. I was once at a red light with traffic also waiting in the cross-direction, guy on a Harley had split and was waiting at the front, heard then saw a SUV plow into the rear end of the last car, a really ugly crash. Dude on the Harley would not have fared well had he not split to the front, no not at all.
 

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I suspect if they made it legal there would be liability attached to it.
 

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Lane splitting is for the ballsy riders who wanna get to a destination before the year ends.
Those that are hesitant about it should stay in the slow lane and STFU.
Lane sharing can be done. Get used to it or don't.
 

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I suspect if they made it legal there would be liability attached to it.
Indeed. Again from that AMA article, "Passing legislation to permit lane splitting may be the easiest part of the process. Significant effort would subsequently be required to educate the law enforcement community, officials and administrators within state departments of transportation and public safety, prosecutors, the judiciary and the general motoring public on the benefits to those groups and motorcyclists to make lane splitting safe for everyone. Using public service announcements and campaigns, traditional broadcast and print media, social media, and other forms of information sharing could assist in highlighting the safety, congestion reduction, and other benefits of lane splitting."
 

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Lane splitting is for the ballsy riders who wanna get to a destination before the year ends.
Those that are hesitant about it should stay in the slow lane and STFU.
Lane sharing can be done. Get used to it or don't.
Agreed. There is an order of magnitude higher alertness to it, not just for the impatient idiots swinging in and out of lanes recklessly if not illegally, gotta keep an occasional eye on your mirrors for other riders (usually sport bikes going a lot faster) including motorcops.

I did a short vid a couple Christmases ago when I got my Sony action cam, me lane splitting on the I-210. It was ordinary as far as riding the line goes, but raises the hairs of those who don't have the balls.
 

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Agreed. There is an order of magnitude higher alertness to it, not just for the impatient idiots swinging in and out of lanes recklessly if not illegally, gotta keep an occasional eye on your mirrors for other riders (usually sport bikes going a lot faster) including motorcops.

I did a short vid a couple Christmases ago when I got my Sony action cam, me lane splitting on the I-210. It was ordinary as far as riding the line goes, but raises the hairs of those who don't have the balls.
If your gonna have that kind of music on your videos you better throw in a few hot belly dancers!
 

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Having followed how the CHP issued and pulled their guidelines, it should be clarified that CA has *no* legislation on the books regarding lane-splitting. There is in fact no state which has a law that makes it legal, but there are many that make it illegal.

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The is a bill in the California Assembly right now to legalize lane splitting: AB-51

Max speed allowed to split 50 mph, max differential 15 mph.

Sounds reasonable to me but you know there will be riders complaining about it. I see bikers splitting when the traffic is 70+ and they are probably 20+ over that. Darwin award candidates.
 

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The is a bill in the California Assembly right now to legalize lane splitting: AB-51

Max speed allowed to split 50 mph, max differential 15 mph.

Sounds reasonable to me but you know there will be riders complaining about it. I see bikers splitting when the traffic is 70+ and they are probably 20+ over that. Darwin award candidates.
There have been bills that didn't pass, let's see how that one does.

The limits you mention are probably in "discretionary" use by the CHP, but good to codify. I'm sure they'll be applied (as they are already) with some geographic weighting, SoCal drivers being the speed maniacs that they are. When traffic is moving, the average flow is 85mph (not exaggerating). 65pmh is considered anti-social.

And because of that, I admit to splitting above the speed limit. When I'm behind some grandpa from Idaho in the car pool lane doing 65 or less and cars are coming up and passing me at 85+, time to scoot. It's all about flow and differential.
 

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The is a bill in the California Assembly right now to legalize lane splitting: AB-51

Max speed allowed to split 50 mph, max differential 15 mph.

Sounds reasonable to me but you know there will be riders complaining about it. I see bikers splitting when the traffic is 70+ and they are probably 20+ over that. Darwin award candidates.
AB-51 was passed in Assembly and withdrawn by the author in the Senate in July. Many in the motorcycle community felt that AB51 was too restrictive. . The bill's sponsor learned of concerns within Governor’s office on how the bill would be implemented; rather than facing a potential veto, the sponsor has decided to hold the bill in committee until 2016. His office will continue to engage with rider groups, California Highway Patrol, Department of Transportation and the Department of Motor Vehicles during the fall and into next year. The bill has passed the Assembly."
 

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Lane splitting is for the ballsy riders who wanna get to a destination before the year ends.
Those that are hesitant about it should stay in the slow lane and STFU.
Lane sharing can be done. Get used to it or don't.
I have only done it once.. (I think I mentioned it earlier in this thread. It was in 2012, on California 405 on a Honda ST1300 with my (then future) wife on the back.

I found California drivers so easy going and relaxed (compared to Toronto 401 drivers!) that it seemed very natural and easy to do. Mind you, I wasn't nearly as aggressive as some of the locals but really don't see why North America doesn't join the rest of the world and allow it.

..Tom
 

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I have only done it once.. (I think I mentioned it earlier in this thread. It was in 2012, on California 405 on a Honda ST1300 with my (then future) wife on the back.

I found California drivers so easy going and relaxed (compared to Toronto 401 drivers!) that it seemed very natural and easy to do. Mind you, I wasn't nearly as aggressive as some of the locals but really don't see why North America doesn't join the rest of the world and allow it.

..Tom
Well, the 405 makes you nearly a seasoned vet!

It is true that the US is behind in this regard (maybe because the 50 states treat themselves like 50 countries). 'Filtering' as the Euros like to call it is standard. I rented once in Paris (while living in Holland), man what a blast, but I've been around the riders in Germany and Spain also. Spaniards have no sense of risk.

It is also true that at least in SoCal the drivers are generally more relaxed, and it has gotten better over the years. I used to get tooted maybe 2-3 times a week, almost never happens now (except by the grandpa from Idaho).

It may also be that you *think* LA drivers are relaxed, it's either resignation or a seething tension that every tinted vehicle could be ready to open fire.
 

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It may also be that you *think* LA drivers are relaxed, it's either resignation or a seething tension that every tinted vehicle could be ready to open fire.
Thankfully in Canada guns aren't really an issue.. if you drive on Hwy 401 through Toronto you will realize that most drivers there are actively mad... they are not only seething with anger in their cars but are also tailgating and blocking to make sure no one can get ahead of them. Overall I have found that pretty much everywhere I have been in the USA drivers are much more relaxed than around Toronto.

For example I was in Atlanta from Sunday until yesterday training with work.

Monday and Tuesday we shuttled from downtown Atlanta out to beside the airport where training was. We were going against traffic and could see the traffic on I75 backed up for miles heading into downtown. I was amazed at how the highway was stop and go but there was usually four or five car lengths between all the cars. You just don't see that around Toronto.

Perhaps the guns down there help keep people polite?

(BTW here is the best part of my job: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjgDkFDeFDk ) :smile2:

..Tom
 

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Looks to me like they've had the legality challenged; can't tell if that's because of busybodies with too much time on their hands or if there was a court case involved; neither would surprise me, and either way I can understand why the CHP is trying to backtrack and cover their asses.
There's a law in California called the Administrative Procedures Act. It has nothing to do with lane splitting. It spells out the steps that enforcement agencies (like the CHP) must take before publishing regulations. (Public notice, opportunity for comment, etc.)

In the past many state agencies published informal "interpretations" intended to help the public understand laws they enforce. But courts have decided that such "interpretations" look too much like "regulations," which cannot be published unless the agency follows the APA. These interpretations are struck down as "underground regulations."

As a result, many state agencies have pulled down this type of interpretation or guidance, for fear of ending up in court due to an underground regulation. I strongly suspect that's what happened here. No California law enforcement agency (to my knowledge) has changed its position on the legality of lane splitting. It's just that they can't formally tell people how to do it because that is a regulatory function.
 
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