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Discussion Starter #1
At risk of starting a new tire thread, has anyone got any experience with knobs on metal bridge decks, good, bad, or ugly?
 

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If by that you mean the grated metal bridge decks, I sure do. There are a fair amount of such bridges here in the Pacific NW, and I used to take my DR650 with knobbies across them.

It sometimes is a change your underwear situation, especially when it is raining or windy. I slow down, put my legs down to just above the road surface, attempt to hold a straight line, and try to avoid braking or rapid acceleration while on the decking. Pretty much the exact same approach I use when encountering a patch of ice.
 

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I went with a bunch of guys on Honda Valkeries, some had car tires on them, on a grate type metal bridge it was interesting to say the least. The car tire bikes were "squirming" all over the place, like ice as posted earlier. Cheers--BB
 

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Discussion Starter #4
When I get done with this set of tourances I want something more dirt worthy. But I have a 500m bridge that's on a 5% grade in the hood, that I need to cross occasionally, and I don't want to meet the troll.
 

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then avoid rider error. the squirmy-ness you feel is the rubber following the metal. your tires are not slip-sliding all over the place. lighten up on the grips, and ride straight. no need to put your feet down either. you would not want a boot catching a piece of the decking...
 

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Yep I had the joy of crossing them on a warm summer days, and a wet fall days. The squrmyness is explected, just stay a little loose (relax) on the bike and keep your eyes up. Keep your feet on the pegs, they are not doing you any good hanging out when they can better serve you sitting on the pegs.

Now you want to talk scary, lets talk wooden deck bridges that are wet.
 

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Hmm. My experience on wet, icy, technical or slippery surfaces has been somewhat different. When I am going slowly on such surfaces, I do have my feet off the pegs and am holding my feet a few inches up from the surface. This has saved my bacon many times by being able to dab a foot or both feet instantaneously. I find this especially helpful with a large top-heavy bike like the Strom.

I started doing this many years back when crawling along technical trails on my dual-sports. I would not do this if I was going along at a good clip on any surface, since I would be afraid of catching my foot.
 

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Bombs away!!!!!! Feet on pegs, keep a staright line and keep speed up and constant. + 1 on the wet wooden bridges. I have had my fair share of oh sh...t moments crossing those
 

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When I am going slowly on such surfaces, I do have my feet off the pegs and am holding my feet a few inches up from the surface. This has saved my bacon many times by being able to dab a foot or both feet instantaneously. I find this especially helpful with a large top-heavy bike like the Strom.
That's why these are catching on as the ultimate riding boot:

 

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^^^ And with the hard shell and that ankle/shin protection, this is also the perfect off-road riding boot. My only concern is if the pink will clash with Fox Orange.
 

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I cross them regularly in Seattle, in all conditions, with nary a problem. Stay relaxed, keep your eyes up the road and your feet on the pegs, and hold a steady throttle and you'll be fine, no dabbing of the feet required or even helpful. As others have posted, you can expect some squirmy feeling, but it's nothing to worry about. Not even on a nightmare like this:

Port of Hood River - Hood River Bridge

This is a narrow, mile-long, steel-deck bridge that spans the Columbia River. I rode over it once in a howling crosswind. That was interesting, even if it was about as much fun as a root canal.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The best technique I've found is to shift your weight forward, grip tank tight with knees, keep the rest of yourself loose, and don't fight the bike.
But this thread is wandering off topic*, the question being are knobs more of a handful on metal decks than street tires?

*I'm in shock
 

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The value of thoughtful sentence construction

the question being are knobs more of a handful on metal decks than street tires?
Ooooh, NOW I get it. I couldn't figure out what he meant by "knobs on metal bridge decks"; I've never seen a metal bridge deck with knobs on it.

Mind your modifiers, friends!
 

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this is true. so back on track...

actually i think knobbies might do better than street tires since they will likely tend to follow the deck grooves less. i've ridden my DR with dunlop 606's for several years in nicaragua. and while i don't do much road riding and haven't crossed all that many bridges, i find that they stray less than even the tourances on my V--which i think are pretty damn good at NOT following cracks and grooves in the road.

anyway, just my $0.02
 

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I don't think that dry level metal grating is that bad. It is only when it is wet, raining, windy or steeply pitched that things get more exciting and it requires more care.
 
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