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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just picked up my first Suzuki(2002). I traded my older Ducati ST2 for it. Looking forward to many miles on it!
 

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Welcome to the club!

On older DL1000s, there are a few well-known issues. You may want to read up on those, and see if the previous owner has maybe done something about them. None of these is a "must fix right now" but it's good to know about them:

- Some people have installed a PowerCommander or similar. Reason is that due to emissions regulations, the engine has been setup with an extremely lean mixture - some consider this too lean. Running a richer mixture at some RPM/Power combinations may lead to a smoother ride, but may also lead to higher fuel burn. My (EU-spec) DL1000 doesn't have any issues.
- Loads of people complaining about turbulence from the windshield. Loads of alternatives available. The PO of my bike installed a Puig windshield, so I have no idea how bad the original one was. But I'm happy with this one.
- The rear sprocket is not quite in line with the front sprocket, leading to premature wear of the chain and sprockets. There is a simple fix where about 2mm is shaved off the spacer in the rear wheel, and a 2mm washer is installed on the outside. DL1000 Rear Wheel Spacer Exchange - AdventureTech, LLC.
- The clutch basket has some weak bearings that eventually lead to "chatter". Two people can update your basket to incorporate better bearings: https://www.werksparts.com/basket-purchase.html (US) and Sharealike Clutch modification for the Suzuki V-Strom and Suzuki SV (UK).
- There are some reports of "idle hammer". It seems rather harmless but supposedly there is a fix. I don't have this problem (or don't have a problem with it) so I never investigated this further. Start here:
http://www.stromtrooper.com/v-strom...nce/78087-idle-hammer-source-found-fixed.html
- Check the seal on the clutch slave cylinder. After a number of years, these tend to start leaking. See http://www.stromtrooper.com/dl1000-2002-2012/22506-clutch-slave-cylinder-leak.html amongst many others. The seal itself is a cheap replacement item, but check that the cylinder and piston have not become pitted due to corrosion. Also, if you replace the cylinder assembly, make sure you also install the new dust cover that sits on top of the piston. This was not present on the first generation (2002-2004?) DL1000s but prevents a lot of problems. (The cylinder seal is part #24, and the dust cover is #25A in this picture: https://www.motorcyclespareparts.eu/suzuki-parts/motorcycles/dl1000-v-strom-2002/clutch-450926.aspx)
- Perform a fuel flow check as detailed in the maintenance manual. If you don't have a high-enough output it's most likely the filter in the high-pressure fuel pump has become clogged. You cannot replace this filter separately: Suzuki requires you to buy a complete new fuel pump assembly instead, which is a costly affair. Some clever guys came up with a solution where you drill a hole somewhere inside the fuel pump assembly. This allows fuel to bypass the clogged filter. You then install an aftermarket (automotive) filter in the fuel line separately. This is a far cheaper solution and if that new filter ever gets clogged in the future, it's about 10 dollars for a new filter. http://www.vstrom.info/Smf/index.php/topic,6105.0.html
- The stator is not quite capable of dealing with the currents induced, leading to a lot of fried stators. It doesn't seem to be a 2002 issue, but more for later DL1000s (2004+?) and DL650s who have a slightly higher electrical output. Also, there have been various reports of the magnets in the rotor coming loose and needing re-attachment (apparently JB Weld works wonders). On the first upcoming service, when the oil is drained anyway, open up the stator housing and make a visual inspection. If you don't see any burned wires on the stator (which lives inside the cover) and if the magnets are still in place (evenly distributed) on the rotor (which is attached to the crankshaft), don't do anything just yet. But do install a voltmeter that can be read during driving, learn the normal voltages for your bike and keep an eye on them.
- Similarly, and possibly related: People have reported fried regulator/rectifiers. Again, possibly, because Suzuki is pushing the limits of what the stator/rotor/R/R is capable of providing. http://www.stromtrooper.com/v-strom-modifications-performance/51559-better-regulator-rectifier.html (Read through the whole thread - there have been some changes in insight over time. Best solution seems to be the SH775, which is still on my to-do list.)
- Check the cush rubbers between the rear sprocket carrier and the rear wheel hub. They're rubber and deteriorate with age. Replacing them will make for a significantly smoother ride. (The cush rubbers are 5x #6 in this: https://www.motorcyclespareparts.eu...es/dl1000-v-strom-2002/rear-wheel-450949.aspx)
- An upgrade to Iridium spark plugs (NGK CR8EIX) may also improve ride experience, and Iridium plugs last a lot longer than the standard ones.
- Older US-Spec DL1000s do not have a switch on the handlebar to activate hazard lights (four-way flashers) and flash-to-pass. If you exchange the left handlebar cluster for a Euro-spec one, or to a later model US-Spec one, you get the hazard switch and the flash-to-pass trigger. All the wiring is already there, it's just a matter of getting a left handlebar cluster with the proper buttons.
- By default the speedo reads a bit high. Some people have experimented with larger or smaller front sprockets, mainly to adjust the power delivery, and this may accidentally correct your speedo as well. Also, there is some sort of speedo healer available out there. http://www.stromtrooper.com/dl1000-2002-2012/9628-speedohealer-calibration.html
- The fuel gauge has five bars but their disappearance isn't linear. My fifth bar hides itself after 150km, the fourth disappears at around 250km and the remaining three are all gone around 300km. Instead of the fuel gauge I just use the odometer to determine when I need to fill up: I start looking for a fuel station around 280 km, and then the bike will take 15-17l.

Other than that, check the normal wear/replacement items as soon as possible: Tires, chain & sprockets, oil & filter, coolant, hydraulic fluids, battery, brake pads & rotors. Also check the stator/rotor and the regulator/rectifier as per the manual - you'll need a multimeter for this.

If you do perform your own maintenance, make sure you get a maintenance manual. In that manual, add the following to the standard list for every service:
- Clean out the front sprocket area. A lot of crud collects here - to a very large extent this is wax/lube/oil flung off the chain combined with road crud.
- Visually check the throttle body booths (the rubber sleeves connecting the throttle body to the air filter that sits under the fuel tank) for tightness. They have a tendency to pop off, leading to erratic engine performance including engine stalls.
- Check the Throttle Position Sender for correct adjustment. http://www.stromtrooper.com/maintenance-how/13035-dl1000-tps-check.html It probably won't need adjustment but the TPS does fail every now and then, again leading to erratic engine performance. By performing the TPS check you know everything is still OK.

Obviously you should also perform the normal tasks detailed in this manual. Not just an oil & filter change, but also an idle adjustment, a valve clearance inspection, throttle body sync, throttle cable adjustment, bearing checks, chain slack adjustment and so forth.

In addition to the original maintenance manual, I also bought the Haynes manual for this bike: https://haynes.com/en-gb/suzuki-tl1000sr-dl1000-v-strom-97-04-haynes-repair-manual. It's got loads more pictures to detail what needs to be done and how. Also, for certain procedures it gives alternate ways of doing them. Useful if you don't have the original Suzuki tools to perform the original procedure.
 

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Welcome Cold Neck, I too am a new owner of an early DL1000.
Mine is an 03.

Back Packer, thanks for a great, informative post.
I read where people refer to the issues with early Vs, but you have done a great job of listing them all in one place.
Thanks so much!!
 

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Welcome!

Owner of a 2002 here. All the above info is great. You have found the place for information on these bikes! Just remember the 02-03 are somewhat different than the 04 up models.

Enjoy your new ride and click off those miles!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks BackPacker and everyone else. That's a ton of good info.
I was hoping to find just that info here. I did score 2 binders with the factory service manual!. The bike came with a taller wind screen, not sure of the make nut it sure is nice.
Also, I thought the speedo read fast...just going by the feel of things hah!!
I'll get it dialed in for sure. I put on about 200 miles today. lots of grave.
 

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Intake boots, TBS, Power Commander with MonkeyButt's map, and bar risers all make this a nice ride!
 
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PineLaneRider - I did a search but couldn't find where to get the MonkeyButt map. Can you point me in the right direction?

Thanks!
 

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So that map is for a PC3, not a PC5. Can you use PC3 maps on a PC5? That would probably explain why I didn't find it. Thanks for replying too!
 

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Seems I can't edit my earlier post, but wanted to add this:

- The current for the headlights runs through the handlebar cluster. This increases the cable run length which leads to a lower voltage at the bulbs. Also, the connectors in the handlebar cluster are not all that good, and not really setup to handle this current, which leads to occasional burn-outs. It's a good idea to change the wiring so that the current through the handlebar cluster only actuates a relay, and the current for the lights itself runs directly from the battery to the lights. http://www.stromtrooper.com/techy-world-gps-electronics-etc/298105-headlight-relay.html
 

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Further to my original post, which suggested to add a voltmeter to the system, I found these at AliExpress:

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Car...32803144737.html?spm=a2g0s.9042311.0.0.z0n93T

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Wat...id=1a759b0c-b691-429b-b758-0c36fbcaf947&tpp=1

The first is a full solution with a cut-out switch for riding at night or when the bike is parked and you don't want the parasite drain. The second is identical to the first, but slightly cheaper and doesn't include the cut-out switch.
 

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- Older US-Spec DL1000s do not have a switch on the handlebar to activate hazard lights (four-way flashers) and flash-to-pass. If you exchange the left handlebar cluster for a Euro-spec one, or to a later model US-Spec one, you get the hazard switch and the flash-to-pass trigger. All the wiring is already there, it's just a matter of getting a left handlebar cluster with the proper buttons.
Further to my original post above, it seems some US-Spec bikes do not have a flasher relay that's capable of dealing with all four lights being activated at once. The flasher relay is located just in front of the battery and there should be markings on this relay looking something like "T: 21Wx2" and "H: 21Wx4". So if you exchange the handlebar, or install some sort of switch to do the four-way flashers, you may also need to upgrade your relay.

(I'm not near the bike right now so I can't check the exact markings. But it seems the relay I have is a Denso FE249JR)
 

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Just wanted to save this link for the future.

In another thread an owner of an older DL1000 had a suspect base gasket leak. As it turns out, it's a leak slightly higher up the cylinder. It's a fairly common failure on high-mileage DL1000s. Actually there's two components to it. There's an o-ring which eventually fails to keep coolant in, but there's also a fuel hose in there which at some point starts leaking. If you've gotten to the point where you can fix one of the problems, it's a good idea to fix the other as well.

This post has all the details regarding the coolant hoses:
https://www.stromtrooper.com/5320371-post39.html

These posts have all the details regarding the fuel crossover hose:
https://www.vstrom.info/Smf/index.php?topic=7728.0
https://www.stromtrooper.com/dl1000-2002-2012/58060-fuel-leak.html
 
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