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I just bought a 2007 Wee this weekend with only 19,000 kms on it. We wanted one with the top trunk and bags and adjustable windshield and it has all of this. Winter is fast approaching here but my wife and had it out for a ride and she loves it! A few things are needed to customize it for her. I have done a fair bit of research on some of the things below. Any hints would be helpful :thumbup:

Lowering links:

-going to buy a pair of used KoubaLink dogbones to drop the back about 1 inch. Once this is done I'll see how the front looks/feels. It has handlebars risers and they are fine for her, just need a bit more confidence in the lower height.

Crash bars:

-I hope she never tips it over but the old bike got tipped 3 times in the 3 years she had it. Mostly due to bad footing. I am leaning toward the SW Motech-Crashbars/Engine Guards (Suzuki DL650 V-Strom, '04-'11) Rally Style. Read here and other places where folks had a bit of vibration problems with the Givi brand. Money well spent I think.

Seat:

-we both agree that the stock seat feels like there is a grapefruit sized ball right at the crack of your....back :green_lol: when riding. I see a lot of folks go to the Suzuki gel seat. I think the problem is we like to sit back farther so the ridge is right in your back from the passenger seat. This farkle will be harder as it's going to be tough to buy a seat without trying it first.


Thanks in advance.
 

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Heated Grips are a must in my book.
Many variations out there but I prefer the Oxford Touring grips from Twisted Throttle.
Got them on both my Vstroms.
Mike
 

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Congrats on the purchase!
-Although I waited almost 5 years to install them, I have to agree that for anyone faced with a shortened season due to something like...winter, heated grips should be high on anyone's list.
Crash bars: Either Givi or SW Motech are good and there are many threads debating which might be better. If you think you might ever seriously want to mount a skid plate as well, my impression is that its easier with SW-Motech bars and plate. As for me, Givi has been fine and proved their worth once or twice.
Any other bits over and above what you've already got will probably involve electrical work and in that case you should look at something like Eastern Beaver's PC-8 fuse panel kit. That would help cover the grips, heated vests, gps power, etc....

Have fun with it.
 

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Hand guards and something to keep at least your hands warm. I have heated gloves myself and love them as they work real well. Better than the heated grips in my opinion. The guards are nice because there were a few times on my old bike, (that never had them), I got a few stones thrown at my hands so the guards are great for that!

Depending on what you plan on doing with this thing, I'd recommend getting a skid plate. I personally don't have one, heh but, just this past weekend I went for a ride up on some logging roads and dinged my exhaust - now it's on my list.

I have the givi crash bars and was sceptical at first considering all of the reviews I heard but I found a great deal out of Texas (150 all in) so I put those on. No vibrations at all - great stuff.
 

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A ridiculous amount of seat info can be found at Seats & Backrests

That being said, a rider/seat relationship is very individual specific. One person's joy can be another person's badly shaped brick.
 

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A couple of observations. Remember that lowering the back by 1 inch, without lowering the front, will cause a change in steering geometry. 1 inch difference front to back would result in a slower steering motorcycle. Also, you may find that you need to shorten the side stand a bit.

The gel seat is taller than the stock DL650 seat. Not quite a full inch, but part way between the DL1000 seat and the DL650 seat. So, you'll lose a bit on the lowering.

I'm planning on trying my hand at customizing the seat. I bought a cheap 2" air polisher grinder at Princess Auto and plan on stripping the back the vinyl on the stock seat and removing a bit of foam. Here's a good link on doing that.

Modify Seat
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Two items I think every Strom should have are headlight relays and a fork brace. You can safely raise the fork tubes in the triple clamps on a non ABS bike with a fork brace about 19mm to lower the front end some.
 

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I agree with Grey on the fork brace, and I just took delivery of a EB headlight relay so I guess I agree with that recomendation too.
As for crash bars I like AltRider products but that is personal taste.

Ride safe,
YH
 

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Fork Brace and an electrical outlet so you can plug in a battery charger this winter. Also comes in handy for a heated vest.
 

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Two items I think every Strom should have are headlight relays and a fork brace. You can safely raise the fork tubes in the triple clamps on a non ABS bike with a fork brace about 19mm to lower the front end some.
I was just gonna add those two thoughts - a fork brace really helps as does keeping the bike level with a maximum 5/8" fork drop at the tree (ABS). I only went 3/4" on my dogbones. Think about adding Sonic springs and you will have the cheapest suspension upgrade to the factory setup - I have all this stuff installed and love my bike's handling.

Heated grips are a must if you ride in cool weather - it's not safe to let your hands get cold and I didn't like thick gloves any better. Symco sells a cheap set.

One last thought - a Stebel air horn will assure you are heard in traffic - also cheap and easy to install.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
A couple of observations. Remember that lowering the back by 1 inch, without lowering the front, will cause a change in steering geometry. 1 inch difference front to back would result in a slower steering motorcycle. Also, you may find that you need to shorten the side stand a bit.
I had a search around here but I don't see a process for lowering the front end/sliding up the fork tubes? I work best with pictures if there is a link. From what I have read the front should not be changed by more than about 19mm or 3/4 inch.

Thanks
 

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It's really straight-forward. There are three pinch bolts holding each fork, one up top and two below. If you have a centerstand, its easy.

Loosen all six bolts and then push down on the handlebars until the tubes slip up. Measure from the line cut into the top of the tube to the top bracket. Tighten the the bolts to the specified torque.

If you don't have a centerstand, then you may need to place blocks under the engine to level the bike, and/or strap it to the ceiling in the garage.

Once the pinch bolts are tightened, you can also loosen the pinch bolt on the front axle and compress the forks a couple of times to make sure that the axle is clamped in the correct position. Retighten to the torque spec in the owner's manual.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The change can be done with just a 10mm wrench and a rubber hammer. On one side, loosen the pinch bolts well on the bottom and just enough on the top to allow tapping with a rubber mallet on the tube top or the triple clamp to create movement. Get the tube where you want it and tighten the pinch bolts. Repeat for the other side. Do one side at a time and you don't need to provide additional support for the bike. The torque spec on the pinch bolts is 16.5lb-ft.

The pic is from back when I had the bike lowered 19mm or 3/4" front and back before I had a fork brace. ABS bikes shouldn't be lowered more than 7mm with a Superbrace or 10mm with other fork braces unless they have accordion style fork gaiters to limit travel. The bike's aerodynamics are greatly improved with the front 10-15mm lower with respect to a stock rear. It makes the bike more stable by preventing the fairing from being a lifting body as well as making the steering more responsive. I went back to a stock rear height to gain the stability and handling advantage even though it meant using only the balls of my feet on the ground backing up the bike.

 

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accessories

Have two month old Wee 650 with ABS. Fitted Heated Grips, Center Stand, Givi Side Racks and 35L panniers and a 46L Top Box on delivery. Have added Crash Bars, Mirror Extenders and a Madstad bracket since, while I wait for a Fork Brace to arrive. Oh, also had a trickle charge lead put on under the seat which could be used for the electric tyre pump if needed. Great bike. Great accessories. Rod
 

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Two items I think every Strom should have are headlight relays and a fork brace. You can safely raise the fork tubes in the triple clamps on a non ABS bike with a fork brace about 19mm to lower the front end some.
headlight relay...why what does it do? I have an 04 DL650 and the lights stay on when the starter is engaged.

I just installed Rick Hughes' peg/control lowering kit, big improvement in comfort for me (32" inseam).
 

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A headlight relay takes the load off undersized contacts and connectors that have had a large number of of failures reported. Do a search on "headlights out" or "no headlights". Even with no starter switch cutout on an '04, the connector in the fairing and the ones behind the radiator have failed in significant numbers. Relays also deliver about a full volt more which is a noticeable increase in brightness.
 

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Thanks Pat, that makes sense! I'll search the threads you suggest, hopfully there's a detailed DIY there.

Thanks,
Bruce
 

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Eastern Beaver makes a complete relay kit for the headlight with instrucions on his web site. Good man to work with. I also got the one headlight cut-off switch, from him, for when I run lots of electrics in the winter when in slow traffic. Following the thread, foot peg lowering kit for long rides, fork brace, lowered forks in clamps all of which made long rides ( 10 days or more) much more pleasant. Next was tweaking electronics, fuse panel with relay (from Eastern Beaver) to add GPS w/Xm radio, radar detector, electric clothing (jacket ), CB Radio with outlets on dash. I also transfered my side bags from my Buell ULy to bike, again for long rides. If my bike did not come with it I would have purchased the Madstad windshield brackets. My wife had a Wee for 18 months before I got mine and without the madstads, I would get a hotspot on my forehead from my helmet but with my bike (which came with madstads) no more hotspot. So in retrospect, after doing all the free stuff such as lowering forks, transfering bags from Buell, I would have done the following in this order, the madstad would have been my first upgrade, then peg lowering kit, then fork brace, then electronics. My next will be working on the suspension, I am probably going with the sonic springs up front, and then eventually will go with the rear shock from sasquash(sp). A side not on the fork tubes, I would recommed doing only one tube at a time. I learned the hard way, on my wifes Wee, without a center stand. I do not recommed that you lossen both sides at the same time, simple if you just do one fork at a time. Sorry about a long post.
 
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