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Discussion Starter #1
I have just now gone over 10k miles on my 13 strom. It has the stock tires and chain on it.

1- My rear tire has a flat bit all the way around, it looks like it's just flat from going long distaces in a fairly straight line! First question- Is this a serious hazard of a possible blow-out or even like a balance issue when turning? Second question- The front tire (less on the rear but still present) there is rubber cracking/aging or mild dry rot I guess is what you could call it. How serious of an issue is this with safety or risk of a blow-out? I do about 90% freeway commuting now that I am in school.





Front Tire


2- Chain- I rode down the street the other day without a helmet and my chain noise seemed incredibly loud, I am pretty religious about lubing the chain every 700 miles as stated in the owners manual. When I heard it I clicked over to trip 2 and I had only gone 400 miles since that last chain lube so I lubed it up and went down the street again with no helmet and the noise had only gone down slightly. I have the correct tension on the chain, again as per the owners manual. So do you guys think this is an indication of my chain on its way out?

Thanks for the input!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Shoot, perhaps I should have posted this under the maintenance section. Mods or whoever feel free to move if needed.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The rear tire could be a problem in the rain and is ready for a change. The front really isn't bad. If you want a different make of tire when you change the rear, I'd change the front to match though.
 

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I know that's a lot of miles for a motorcycle tire, but it's a little disturbing that it is only about a year old with that kind of cracking. Still looks like there's plenty of tread, so not sure if it's a hazard.

My practically new chain is pretty noisy as well, especially noticeable when passing something that reflects the sound back. I'm using Liquid Performance chain lube which is like a chain wax, just leaves a thin, relatively dry layer, so I guess there's not a lot of "goop" on there to dampen noise. Most folks seem to get well over 10K out of a chain.
 

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Come on man. Just change the tires. If they are as bad as im thinking then new ones should be in order especially at 10k. Tires you should never skmp on IMO. those are the only part of the bike thatkeeps constant contact between u and the road. Not trying to lecture you. Just saying.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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It's common for blocks on dual sport tires to do that. I doubt the tire is one year old just because the bike is. Check for a four digit number on the side of the tire like 1409 for example. That would indicate the tire was made in the 14th week of 2009.
 

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That number is the last four digits of the DOT code. The first two letters or numbers I.D. The factory. The other numbers relate to the production. http://www.harriger.com/tires.htm

You're in the beach waffle county...Sandy Eggo...and frequent rain isn't a concern. The new Bridgestone Battleax T30 would be a great choice for a highway tire. If you go off pavement, the Michelin Anakee 3 would be a good choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well I wasn't planning to skimp on the tires, or even try to get the most use out of them within reason of safety.

Second if I am reading the DOT codes correctly they were manufactured at the Nasu Plant in Kuroiso, Japan the 6th week of 2013, I bought the bike in May of 2013 so the tires are actually about as old as the bike! Imagine that!





I am still not sure what tires I will get but it will be soon that is for sure, and also I moved back to Utah and forgot to change my details! Lots of different weather here so I should be safe and change them!
 

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Were the sprockets replaced at the same time as the chain? The first time I replaced a chain I kept the old sprockets on and it made a god awful racket. Replacing the sprockets soon afterwards made the sound go away.

EDIT: forget that, it's the original chain and sprockets, right? Have a look at the chain and look for binding or damaged o-rings. They are pretty noisy without a helmet on though, even when in good condition.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Were the sprockets replaced at the same time as the chain? The first time I replaced a chain I kept the old sprockets on and it made a god awful racket. Replacing the sprockets soon afterwards made the sound go away.

EDIT: forget that, it's the original chain and sprockets, right? Have a look at the chain and look for binding or damaged o-rings. They are pretty noisy without a helmet on though, even when in good condition.
It is the original chain and sprockets and I have done a fairly good inspection. At least as good as my knowledge base is about chains anyways, and I cant seem to see anything physically wrong with it. I do quite a bit of dirt road/trails travel, will this wear a belt quicker than strictly street riding?
 

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I'd change the rear tire, you've got to be past the wear marks. I wouldn't worry about the cracking on the front - it's in a lug area where rubber is thick. Just promise me one thing: that you'll ride hard until you do need a fresh tire - and make it soon ;)
The noise could be almost anything. First change the rear tire, then see where that leaves you. Chain noise is probably just part of the equation. As for how many miles you get on a chain - that's very individual (I run a Scottoiler and got 32,000 out of my first chain - would have gone longer if it weren't for winter, salt, and sand). Yes, your dirt and sand can wear it out quicker. Look for kinks and other signs of wear.
Enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'd change the rear tire, you've got to be past the wear marks. I wouldn't worry about the cracking on the front - it's in a lug area where rubber is thick. Just promise me one thing: that you'll ride hard until you do need a fresh tire - and make it soon ;)
The noise could be almost anything. First change the rear tire, then see where that leaves you. Chain noise is probably just part of the equation. As for how many miles you get on a chain - that's very individual (I run a Scottoiler and got 32,000 out of my first chain - would have gone longer if it weren't for winter, salt, and sand). Yes, your dirt and sand can wear it out quicker. Look for kinks and other signs of wear.
Enjoy!
I don't think I could just change the rear tire :-? I think I am a little OCD like that I guess. I will probably go with Shinko 705's cause there very affordable and are a little more aggressive in the dirt than the stockers are which is what I want. I feel the stocker tires leave a little to be desired when riding off road and as I will mostly commute on the freeway but still go off road 2 or 3 times a month, this tire matches those requirements. I think the advertised 80/20 ratio will work out very well for my needs!

I think I am going to get an auto oiler as well for my chain, one that varies with the speed, I forget what brand it is but I'm sure a google search will reveal this quickly. I am going to replace the chain and sprockets with the tires because I want to adjust the RPM's and display a more correct speed on the freeway. A quick forum search I am sure will also reveal the best results for this and what chain to get.

As for the actual replacement of the tire, do you suppose I should just order them online and then take my wheels off and just take the wheels and new tires to a shop and have them put them on or should I attempt to do this myself? I do all my own maintenance on all my vehicles but have never messed with tires and balancing on any vehicle. Thoughts?
 
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