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Portable tire pumps like the Slime 40001 Motorcycle Tire Inflator come with multiple connection options, one being a cord with a pig-tail and alligator clips to connect to the battery.

Question: If you had two motorcycles and one's battery was dead, could you use this pig-tail connector to jump start the bike?
 

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Not ideal, because typically you want the vehicle getting a jump to only get the positive lead and the negative should go to ground. BUT.. loads of people do it wrong and connect + to + and - to -... after some sparks, the jump does work. So.. while I wouldn't use that approach, I am guessing that yes, it can be done.
Has anyone tried? :)
 

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I would say no. The wires are too small. Just look at the wire from the battery to the starter solenoid and that is only running 1 foot.
 

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I wouldn't jump with less than 6ga wire, 4 ga preferable, there's a lot of amps, even a 6ga wire will get hot if it has to crank more than 2 seconds
 

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No longer can one wire the positives together, then touch bumpers to achieve circuit.
 

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Aren't starters on bikes drawing anywhere from 50-100 amps when they're turning the engine over? That's a lot of amperage running through an 18 or 22 gauge wire that's several feet long (which is what a lot of those wires are in things like a small air compressor). I checked my amp rating chart, and a 12 volt, 50 amp load on a wire that's 7 feet long requires 12 gauge wire. Seven feet of wire at 100 amps and 12 volts would require 10 gauge.
 

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Yup ..mine is 5 years old now and works the charm. I have the 3 ...would get the 5 buying today.
Use it every day for all sorts of stuff...forever battery, charge the phone etc
 

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I'll go against the crowd here because I have actually jumped a couple of bikes through my SAE pig tail now with no visible ill effect. We'll see in the long term if there is any issue to the wiring, but it works just fine. I have a three foot coiled cord off my battery tender pigtail that I use to provide power to my tank bag, and I just stretch that over to the dead bike and pop on a small set of battery tender alligator clips that I carry.

I have a 7.5 amp fuse in the harness that it was running through, and it didn't pop indicating the draw was actually quite a bit smaller than you might think. Both times the start was just as quick as with a good battery in the bike, so no time to heat anything up. The other battery is seldom fully dead, so it is likely providing some help even if it can't crank the bike alone.

Alternately, if it didn't get quite enough juice to crank over, you could leave it connected with the second bike running (preferably at slightly increased rpm) to charge the dead bikes battery a bit first.

Just beware and don't go sae pig tail-bike 1 to sae pigtail-bike 2, as that would actually reverse the polarity. Use the alligator clips on one end or the other.
 

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You may well be right; I don't know how many amps are going through a set of jumper cables from a good battery to a bad one when you turn the key on the bike with the bad battery. The starter can draw maybe 50-100 amps from the battery on the bike when it's turning over, but how that translates to the load on the jumper cables from the donor bike, I really don't know. Having that depleted battery in the circuit between the donor bike and the starter on the bad bike must have some sort of effect on the load in the jumper cables, but I don't know what it might be. The amp ratings I gave earlier would apply more to a power source directly connected to a load; in this case, I don't know how the dead battery affects that.

Maybe someone here with a far better level of electrical knowledge can chime in.
 

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TheMartyMac is correct IMO.



It all depends on how dead the battery is and how long you want to wait. A slightly under charged battery may just need a little help, where as a mostly dead battery may require a bit of charging before it will turn the motor over.
 

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A lot of it will come down to why the battery is dead ?

A flat battery should give very little problems but a stuffed battery will prove more troublesome.

Also jumping a bike with a stuffed battery could be asking for trouble, a battery works like a big sponge and absorbs power spikes, if the battery is stuffed it can't do that.
 

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I do always come back to this, though; there's a reason that they make jumper cables in the gauges they do. Even the ones I bought for my bike are something like 6 GA, and they were marketed specifically for motorcycles. Same with cars; the ones I have in my car are heavy gauge. If you're jumping a car, you're doing the same thing that you are when you're jumping a bike; connecting the donor battery to a discharged battery. Somewhere along they way, someone decided that you needed a heavy gauge wire to do this, otherwise all battery-to-battery jumper cables (cars included) would be something like 18 gauge zip wire.

Has to be a reason they're the gauge they are.
 

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I do always come back to this, though; there's a reason that they make jumper cables in the gauges they do. Even the ones I bought for my bike are something like 6 GA, and they were marketed specifically for motorcycles. Same with cars; the ones I have in my car are heavy gauge. If you're jumping a car, you're doing the same thing that you are when you're jumping a bike; connecting the donor battery to a discharged battery. Somewhere along they way, someone decided that you needed a heavy gauge wire to do this, otherwise all battery-to-battery jumper cables (cars included) would be something like 18 gauge zip wire.

Has to be a reason they're the gauge they are.
my car/truck set is 1ga fine stranded copper that I built with welder cable, been thinking of building a lighter set for MC jumping
 

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LOL Randy, I made my own set years ago off of some (I think) 4 gauge stranded cable someone gave me. They worked well, but they were kind of heavy. Yours must have been like jump starting a car with the transatlantic cable.

I'm really curious about this now....why do they need to be such a heavy gauge? Or do they?
 

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I do always come back to this, though; there's a reason that they make jumper cables in the gauges they do. Even the ones I bought for my bike are something like 6 GA, and they were marketed specifically for motorcycles. Same with cars; the ones I have in my car are heavy gauge. If you're jumping a car, you're doing the same thing that you are when you're jumping a bike; connecting the donor battery to a discharged battery. Somewhere along they way, someone decided that you needed a heavy gauge wire to do this, otherwise all battery-to-battery jumper cables (cars included) would be something like 18 gauge zip wire.

Has to be a reason they're the gauge they are.
Ya, I prefer to just keep a set under the seat. The motorcycle size ones wrapped up around a Slime pump case fit in the rear area under the seat just fine on my 12 DL650.
 
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