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Discussion Starter #1
I was doing some chain maintenance and noticed some cracks in the part of the hub that the rear sprocket bolts to. I looked even closer at them with a 10X loop and they certainly look like cracks to me. I am hoping that someone will chime in saying that those are just defects in the casting or maybe in the coating if it has any.
The bike is a 2008 Wee with 8200 pretty easy going miles. No wheelies, jumps or dumping of the clutch. I'm a lightweight @ 165lbs and never ride 2 up, so no overwhelming stress has been put on it. I did some searching and couldn't find any other threads with a similar description, anyone else notice these cracks or is my case just a random fluke?
 

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It's hard to tell by the picture, you'll have to take it off and inspect the other side, if it does not go through to the visible eye, you can have it dye checked at a local welding shop. I have never seen one cracked yet, but I am sure that others may have on this forum.

Clem
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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You are okay, (99.9% sure....). Nearly every hub I have looked at, looks exactly like the one you have. It's from the casting. Mine is like that and I have close to 65,000 miles on it. I don't plan on changing it. I'll keep riding.

B.
 

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My hub also has a similar look.

 

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Just casting marks, have you seen the crappy mold results on the engine case?:yikes:
 

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I've got the same on my '07 as well...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the replies, it's reassuring that it's not all that uncommon. I'll keep an eye on it while trying to pile on the miles.
 

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Same here..........Suzuki spares no expence on the Vstrom....
 

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The common 'brand name' that everybody refers to for crack checking is Magna-Flux (like 'Kleenex' for tissues). Apply the penetrant, apply a magnetic field to get it to penetrate every nook and cranny, then apply the 'developer' and if there's any cracks, they fluoresce like a cheap hotel room under a black light. :)

Any engine machine shop should have all the stuff needed to check it, as should most good welding shops. They check heads, blocks, and cranks for cracks with it.
 

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They all look like that. I just installed a new one (for other reasons) and it looks like yours, only shiny. :mrgreen:
 

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A dye penetrant kit costs about $40 for three aerosol cans...cleaner, dye, developer. It works great, but might not work so well on the rough casting. The dye needs to be cleaned very well from the surface so only the dye remaining in a fault will show on the developer.

Magnaflux is both a brand name of dye penetrant supplies and a brand name of magnetic particle testing supplies which is only used on iron/steel materials.
 

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It's fine...

mine looks like that too...

Next time I have my back wheel off, I might sand that thing down and hit it with some flat or bedliner black, because it bugged me as well.
 

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These rear hubs are TOUGH!

In 2009, a gent in an Audi looked down to see how to shift into second,
when he should have been looking up to see the stopped bike ahead of him.

Result: some $2000 damage to my bike and roughly the same to the Audi.

One part of the damage was that one side of the rear rim was pushed in
about an inch. Oddly enough, no air escaped, so after the paperwork was done,
I tried riding the motorcycle, and it seemed to go OK, but I decided
to stay under 40 MPH until a new hub was mounted.

By and by everything was mended, and I took the dead hub home to recycle.
As its worth was determined only by its weight, I decided to beat on it to
see whether it changed shape or broke first. I am familiar with front brake
levers, which bend like pretzels when they hit the road, but break like light
bulbs when I try to push or bang them back into shape.

And which did the hub do?
Neither, no matter how hard I beat on it with my hammer.

I know how to use a hammer, and here is how I learned.

One winter day in Canada, I found that my fence was sagging because
a wooden post had broken at ground level. I determined to pound a T-bar
into the ground next to the post, and wire it to the broken post and leave
neater repairs until spring made work more pleasant. So I started pounding,
doink, doink, Doink, Doink, DOINK, DOINK, and the T-bar would NOT go into
the frozen ground. Its reluctance was not surprising, because I was reaching
up to pound on the T-bar, and the ground was thoroughly frozen.

So I got a stool to stand on, and thought of some Canadian politicians I
would prefer to pound on, instead of this humble and innocent rusty T-bar.
As I pounded, I loudly hollered, "Trudeau, LaLonde, Chretien!" again and again.
Progress was quite rapid, and I got the T-bar deep enough quite quickly.

Unfortunately, I broke my hammer.

So I summoned the same three villains to help me beat on the
ruined rear hub, but this time neither they nor I could dent it.

They is TOUGH!
Keith
 

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It's ok. I used to work in a die cast factory. It's called heat check and it's when the casting die after so many cycles starts to form minute cracks and this shows up on the casting
 

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