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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone else have a problem reaching the rear brake? Because of where the tank is and the way my foot naturally sits, I find it difficult to get on the rear brake in any reasonable amount of time. My foot just angles out too much and it's really uncomfortable to ride with it pointed more forward.

Does anyone make an extended lever?
 

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Not sure what you mean, but you can adjust the height of the brake pedal so you don't have to lift your foot as high.... if thats what you mean.
 

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I haven't seen an extension made, but that doesn't mean it can't be made. You might have to do some research on metal fab folks in your area and see if they can make something.
 

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Does anyone else have a problem reaching the rear brake? Because of where the tank is and the way my foot naturally sits, I find it difficult to get on the rear brake in any reasonable amount of time. My foot just angles out too much and it's really uncomfortable to ride with it pointed more forward.

Does anyone make an extended lever?
I ride in crossfire TAs which are pretty stiff boots by any standard and I have no trouble reaching and using the rear brake, so I wonder what your specific issue is. Are you saying you ride duck-footed and you just have trouble swinging your foot over the lever in time or are you saying you physically have problems reaching it at any point?

If I read your message correctly, you ride duck footed like me with your toe probably 1-2" to the right of the lever. If that's correct, I think you're just being overly concerned and you'll get used to it eventually. I really only use the rear brake in extreme last minute stopping (paired with front) or casual long stopping (without the front). 90% of my braking is front alone.

It's all what your particular riding style is, but I generally even lift my foot off the peg and reposition before using the brake (and many times the clutch).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I ride in crossfire TAs which are pretty stiff boots by any standard and I have no trouble reaching and using the rear brake, so I wonder what your specific issue is. Are you saying you ride duck-footed and you just have trouble swinging your foot over the lever in time or are you saying you physically have problems reaching it at any point?

If I read your message correctly, you ride duck footed like me with your toe probably 1-2" to the right of the lever. If that's correct, I think you're just being overly concerned and you'll get used to it eventually. I really only use the rear brake in extreme last minute stopping (paired with front) or casual long stopping (without the front). 90% of my braking is front alone.

It's all what your particular riding style is, but I generally even lift my foot off the peg and reposition before using the brake (and many times the clutch).
I must be a bit duck footed. I notice it when sitting on a chairlift for skiing too. my skis form a big V if I let my feet relax naturally.

And yeah, 99% of the time, I stop with engine braking and the front. But I want to use both front and rear so it's second nature to do if I have an emergency. Currently it is physically difficult and takes real conscious thought to use it.

I'll check at work and see if someone there might be able to help fab something up.
 

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I must be a bit duck footed. I notice it when sitting on a chairlift for skiing too. my skis form a big V if I let my feet relax naturally.

And yeah, 99% of the time, I stop with engine braking and the front. But I want to use both front and rear so it's second nature to do if I have an emergency. Currently it is physically difficult and takes real conscious thought to use it.

I'll check at work and see if someone there might be able to help fab something up.

Do you ride with the balls of your feet on the pegs? Generally that's the "correct" technique. Won't scrape your feet when leaned over.

You move your feet to shift and brake and then back into position.

Adjust the top of the brake pedal even with the peg so that it takes a deliberate push to activate the brake.
 
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