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Discussion Starter #1
So I had a FI/solid red light error show up while riding a rain storm. After getting in dealer mode, it shows up as C40, ISC valve. The actual symptoms are only obvious when I start: the bike starts good, but idles just under 1000 RPM. After it has warmed up, it climbs back to the usual 1300 RPMs

Problem is, the issue is intermittent. So I have some questions:

1. If intermittent could it still be the valve or, once it fails it is done? Could it be a poor connection, something else?
2. If ISC valve, is it something easy to replace? I am low budget guy, can I get away with a used one? Is it tricky to calibrate?
3. I parked my bike home after that rainy ride. The next morning I went to start the bike: nothing. Battery completely flat. Coincidence?
4. How bad to ride with a C40 issue?
5. Where is the valve located? Can I check the connections without removing the air box?

Thanks heaps,

`CW
 

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Discussion Starter #2
In the interest of feeding this thread for future consumption, Her's what I got so far:

- I tested the bike once more prior to disassembly: the FI error is still present
- Yes, to access the ISC valve you need the airbox off. It is located on the right side of the frame, just next to the forward air intake
- I electrically tested the unit as per manual, page 13-34: all fine, resistance is just under 30 ohms, and both circuits are isolated (infinity)
- I wanted to mechanically check the valve as per manual page 13-63, but the screws are way too tight. I suspect the motor inside is crudy and done with
- I put everything back together (always a tricky part for me): the FI error is now gone. But I suspect it will return.

No conclusion at this point, but I'll keep this thread going.
 

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Never had to work on the valve. But would say before condemning it check all the hoses connected to it. Make sure they are clear and are not cracked or kinked. Pricy unit. Can buy 4 used ones for the price of a new one.
 

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With the bike warmed up and running, hit the kill switch and wait a few seconds then turn off the ignition. About 5 seconds after the ignition is turned off you should hear a chirping noise which is the ECU setting the ISC valve to its home position. You'll need to do this in a fairly quiet place but it is noticeable. If you don't hear the chirp then either the servo motor is bad, the valve is stuck or the wiring to the valve is loose or disconnected.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
With the bike warmed up and running, hit the kill switch and wait a few seconds then turn off the ignition. About 5 seconds after the ignition is turned off you should hear a chirping noise which is the ECU setting the ISC valve to its home position. You'll need to do this in a fairly quiet place but it is noticeable. If you don't hear the chirp then either the servo motor is bad, the valve is stuck or the wiring to the valve is loose or disconnected.
What I've found is that the chirping noise is even more evident when doing a reset of the ISC valve i.e. same procedure you outlined, but in Dealer mode.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Latest update...

It was sunny in CA and after I took the bike apart and put it together, the fault was gone. Did some reading as suggested on this thread, and one thread in particular took my interest:

https://www.stromtrooper.com/dl650-dl650a-2004-2011/72559-bike-fixed-isc-valve-error-code.html

Because my bike discharged (with the ignition off!) i suspect this was the issue.

Yesterday the rain storms were back. I had to use the bike, so a chance to test the system.

Rode an hour south to SF, no issue.
Worked all day, bike was sitting there
Rode home, an hour north, still no issue
Went inside for dinner, came back outside and turned on the ignition: BANG! the issue is back

The sun back, should dry things off for a bit, but what I'll do this morning is preset the ISC Valve position (page 13-64) and see what happens.

If there is a leak in the wiring, it sure would be nice to know where that's taking place....but we know the ISC valve wiring is involved, so maybe a visual of the harness would helped. Out of curiosity I check at the ECM to make sure that was dry: all good.

The saga continues...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
After resetting the ISC Valve, today is a dry day so I went for a ride. The error is no longer there.

One point I noticed: when the C40 code is on, the "chirp" of the valve is definitely not present. So the error code is accurate, but it doesn't mean the valve is failing, it can still be wiring issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
In case anyone is reading this...

The fault returned, no riding, no rain, just sitting there outside in the lot. Error C40.

I disconnected the negative terminal and noticed a current draw of 300-400 mA, ignition off. A good hint. Disconnected some fuses, and fuse 3 is the culprit circuit. It happens to be the one feeding the ISC valve, and that fuse is wired direct to the battery, which explains it going flat with the ignition off.

As I was disassembling the bike to access the connector to the valve, I noticed the current leak stopped as I removed the fuel tank. After some investigating, I realized that if I applied pressure to the front right of the airbox, the leak returned. So somehow, the issue seems to be a mechanical/electrical problem...not yet clear on what, but a failed ISC valve is getting less and less on my radar.

I took the airbox off and re-assembled, taking great care of leaving clearance between the airbox and the top of the connector to the valve - they are real close, in fact there is an indent for it inside the airbox. Now when I press on the airbox the leak does occur. I put the bike all back together, and will ride it some in the next few days. In the rain!
 

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In case anyone is reading this...

The fault returned, no riding, no rain, just sitting there outside in the lot. Error C40.

I disconnected the negative terminal and noticed a current draw of 300-400 mA, ignition off. A good hint. Disconnected some fuses, and fuse 3 is the culprit circuit. It happens to be the one feeding the ISC valve, and that fuse is wired direct to the battery, which explains it going flat with the ignition off.

As I was disassembling the bike to access the connector to the valve, I noticed the current leak stopped as I removed the fuel tank. After some investigating, I realized that if I applied pressure to the front right of the airbox, the leak returned. So somehow, the issue seems to be a mechanical/electrical problem...not yet clear on what, but a failed ISC valve is getting less and less on my radar.

I took the airbox off and re-assembled, taking great care of leaving clearance between the airbox and the top of the connector to the valve - they are real close, in fact there is an indent for it inside the airbox. Now when I press on the airbox the leak does occur. I put the bike all back together, and will ride it some in the next few days. In the rain!
Very interesting fault. and good fault finding on your part. I look forward to reading what you find. Are there any harnesses or connectors under where you are applying pressure?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Very interesting fault. and good fault finding on your part. I look forward to reading what you find. Are there any harnesses or connectors under where you are applying pressure?
Yes, there is. The connector to the ISC valve goes upward, and the wires immediately make a 180 to be routed downward. When pressing on the (open) airbox, I can see the indented corner pressing against the harness, and then against the valve assembly itself. Visual inspection of the connector showed no sign of wear, or chaffing, tho it is still possible the wires inside go open from pressure. Another option is that the pressure causes the inners of the valve (I am thinking it is two coils, charged at 12V) make contact with the body of the valve, which connects to ground via chassis mount. If ground isn't needed as a reference for the signal to the ECM, then it may be wise to mount the ISC valve in isolation to the chassis. Because if this were to seriously short, it would blow up the Fuel #3 fuse i.e the pump relay, clock, and parts of the ECM. To me, this is of concern, and a flaw in the design.
 

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Yes, there is. The connector to the ISC valve goes upward, and the wires immediately make a 180 to be routed downward. When pressing on the (open) airbox, I can see the indented corner pressing against the harness, and then against the valve assembly itself. Visual inspection of the connector showed no sign of wear, or chaffing, tho it is still possible the wires inside go open from pressure. Another option is that the pressure causes the inner of the valve (I am thinking it is two coils, charged at 12V) make contact with the body of the valve, which connects to ground via chassis mount. If ground isn't needed as a reference for the signal to the ECM, then it may be wise to mount the ISC valve in isolation to the chassis. Because if this were to seriously short, it would blow up the Fuel #3 fuse i.e the pump relay, clock, and parts of the ECM. To me, this is of concern, and a flaw in the design.
interesting, if you remove the connector from the ISC valve and play around with it. As in, twist, push/pull on the wires from the back and if there are pins open in connector try wiggling them around to see if there is anyway you can get the parasitic drain to pop back up. If not, it is a safe bet that the connector side is ok and that issue lies in the valve body.

I am not familiar with the inner workings with the valve body but if there are coils in there and they have a nominal resistance that you can measure I would try measuring them and while that is happening apply pressure were you know it faults the system and see if you can get the resistance to change. If that happens well it is safe to assume that your fault is with the valve body as you said earlier. A good way to test it is if you have one probe on the ISC and an other on the chassis. if you apply pressure and get anything other then an open (assuming they are suppose to be isolated) then there is your short.
 

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Intermittent electrical problems are difficult to troubleshoot. Check that the metal tabs in the connector or on the valve itself are not corroded, since this occurred during a ride in the rain. If the connection looks good, unfortunately, it could be an abraded harness with an exposed wire randomly shorting out anywhere between the ISC and the ECU. Of course, it could also be a bad valve. Getting to the valve for replacement (you have to pull the airbox) and inspecting the harness is a pain and about the same amount of work. A bad valve isn't very common but if you didn't want to do the repair twice I would just buy a used valve on ebay (~$50, it is the same valve used on the SV so parts are easy to find) then open it up and inspect the harness, replace the valve and inspect the hoses that connect to the throttlebody and airbox to make sure they aren't leaking or loose.
 

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CW, take a sharp knife and carefully slit the harness covering to expose the wiring inside. Look at the colors of the wires in the harness and match them to the wires at the ISC connector. Look for pinched or damaged wireing in that harness dent location while monitoring that circuit's current draw.

Intermittent electrical problems are not all that difficult to diagnose. The key here is to duplicate the conditions under which the fault occurs so as to .establish a repeatable pattern. Then you can get your hands on the problem. This also is used to verify the repair.

I "substitue with known good part" only as a last resort, not a first.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Update.

I tool Long Legged Lucy (my Wee) on a ride to work, 1.5 hours east, riding through storms, through good weather. The FI error hasn't returned.

Still, I bought a used ISC valve and keeping it handy. I still feel the potential for an internal short is greater than a harness fault; because neither harness or airbox have any links to ground, so I can't imagine a leak happening there.

I'll update as things unfold.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I received today a lightly used ISC valve with clean crisp tubing. I took it apart: not much to it really, can't see too much how it could ever short to ground.

Will likely replace, as a safety, and for two reasons:
- If a failure led to a short and blew up fuse #3, I'd would be stuck wherever I am (that really makes me wonder about reliability of FI bikes...)
- Replacing the ISC valve, if the fault returns then I know the fault is in the harness/mounting of the valve.

~CW
 
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