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I want to remove a reflective sticker I applied to me helmet (Shoei Qwest- flT black I'd it matters), will WD40 or alcohol damage the finish?
Thanks,
YH
 

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I've used a citrus based label remover on a helmet without trouble, that may be fairly close to WD40. Isopropyl alcohol will prolly be okay, but I dunno if I'd trust denatured alcohol.
 

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I have had good luck with peanut butter on the adheisive., not chunky though.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I've had denatured alcohol take paint off a helmet. I never had a problem with WD40 though.
 

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Nce again, Grey to the rescue. Thanks
How do I get the WD40 off.
Denatured alcohol :biggrinjester:

Seriously though, I've used WD40 to remove tar and stuff from plastics with no ill effect. Athletic departments use something to remove decals from football helmets, but I can't remember what it's called. A phone call or two to the local high school could probably get the info.
 

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I haven't done an exhaustive analysis, but I'd recommend using no lubricant of any kind on any of the rotating parts of a helmet that has rotating parts -- flip-up face shields and the chin bars of modulars.
 

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I'd recommend using "GooGone". It's made specifically to take off the sticky residue of adhesives. Works well and won't damage the finish.

Home - Goo Gone

Hope this helps.
 

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WD40 and alcohol products break down Helmet shell materials at the molecular level, thus making them more brittle and susceptible to premature failure when needed. Use a vegetable oil to remove adhesives and then clean the oil off with mild dish soap.
 

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try

try a heat gun or hair dryer to get off the sticker, it doesn't take much heat. = then a little bit of WD-40, cooking oil, peanut butter will also do it. I don't think the WD-40 will hurt a thing, I've been using it for many years, never had a problem, it's the fish oil in WD that does the work. Helmets are tough, they have to be. Wipe it off with a towel, then a bit of cleaner, then shine it up with your favorite wax, it'll look like new. Oh, stop worring.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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WD40 won't even penetrate the paint layer. It won't harm the shell if it is just rubbed on the outside.
 

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try a heat gun or hair dryer to get off the sticker, it doesn't take much heat. = then a little bit of WD-40, cooking oil, peanut butter will also do it. I don't think the WD-40 will hurt a thing, I've been using it for many years, never had a problem, it's the fish oil in WD that does the work. Helmets are tough, they have to be. Wipe it off with a towel, then a bit of cleaner, then shine it up with your favorite wax, it'll look like new. Oh, stop worring.
I just used Isopropyl on my helmet for cleaning it up before applying a decal, I also used it on the bike to clean up the left over adhesive from the stock decals.
No paint came of, it is safe to use. If anything would have come off my pink cloth would have turned white (helmet and bike are white).

Just heat up the decals properly with a hair dryer before you start putting any chemical, it will come off - use fingernails or guitar pick to help you take it off.
Then apply some of the Isopropyl to clean up the adhesive.
It is simple and safe.

I also used WD-40 on the stock tank warning decal - it is also safe, and works. Isopropyl is cheaper and seems to be working better, as it is not oily and vapors in a few seconds.
 

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There are two kinds of helmets out there: fiberglass and polycarbonate, usually Lexan. Some polycarbonate helmets have the color molded in and therefore no protective layer -- with these I'd be a little careful what you put on them, but WD-40 or Goof-Off should be perfectly safe. Fiberglass-shell helmets are painted and have a clear coat top layer, so anything you would use on automotive paint (which is about anything) should be OK.

The only solvent I would avoid like the plague is acetone.
 

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There are two kinds of helmets out there: fiberglass and polycarbonate, usually Lexan. Some polycarbonate helmets have the color molded in and therefore no protective layer -- with these I'd be a little careful what you put on them, but WD-40 or Goof-Off should be perfectly safe. Fiberglass-shell helmets are painted and have a clear coat top layer, so anything you would use on automotive paint (which is about anything) should be OK.

The only solvent I would avoid like the plague is acetone.
Yeah, I don't know what solvents might have what effect on polycarbonate. I found this:

  • Excellent resistance (no attack) to dilute acids and mineral oils.
  • Good resistance (minor attack) to Alcohols and vegetable oils.
  • Limited resistance (moderate attack and suitable for short term use only) to Aldehydes.
  • Poor resistance (not recommended for use) with Concentrated Acids, Bases, Esters, Aliphatic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Halogenated Hydrocarbons, Ketones and Oxidizing Agents.
So, for unfinished polycarbonate, definitely not gasoline, and possibly the Stoddard solvent in WD40 would not be good, although exposure would be of short duration. Alcohol sounds like it would work well.

Another solvent I wouldn't suggest is nail polish remover - even the non-acetone stuff is potent and will remove clear coat or fully-cured paint.
 

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There are two kinds of helmets out there: fiberglass and polycarbonate,
Plus carbon fiber reinforced polymer...usually epoxy, maybe polyester or vinyl ester.
 

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1. go to Shoei website
2. find contact info
3. contact them
4. ask same question
5. take their advice and follow it

GW is probably right, though. All the bloody price stickers on my children's plastic toys, cups, etc. come off with a little WD40 on a cloth, then hot dish-soapy water to clean off the WD40. The toys and cups etc. show no ill effects, nor do the children.
 
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